8 Tips for British English Pronunciation

{“en”:”Hi, everyone. I’m Jade. What we’re talking about today is some pronunciation tips for British English. Some of them are tips; some of them are observations that you might be interested to know. We’ve got eight of them, so let’s get started. Pronunciation of-ed word endings. This is not specifically a British English issue. If your preference — I don’t know why I can’t speak suddenly in an English pronunciation video, but that’s how it is. If your preference is American English, this also applies to American English. So what I hear a lot at, sort of, around intermediate level — sometimes upper intermediate level if you haven’t had someone to correct you — -ed word endings sound like this.

I can’t even do it because it’s so unnatural for me. “Excite-ed shout-ed, remind-ed.” It’s so unnatural for me. But in fact, it’s not like that. It doesn’t sound like an -ed. It might sound like an /id/; it might sound like a /t/; or it might sound like a /d/. So I’ve got some examples here. This word, even though it’s spelled -ed, makes an /id/ sound. It becomes “excited”. “I’m really excited.” “Shouted.” “He shouted at me.” “Reminded.” “I reminded you to do your homework; didn’t I?” And — yeah.

So now, we can talk about the ones that finish with a t sound. “Finished. Dripped. Laughed.” They don’t have the-ed sound. So that’s an important thing to know about pronunciation. Even if it’s spelled-ed, it doesn’t mean it sounds like that. And what about the ones that end with a d sound, a “duh” sound. “Remembered.” “I remembered what you said to me.” “Called.” “I called you. Didn’t you hear your phone?” “Imagined.” “I imagined a better future for everyone.” So with those, it’s a D sound. How do you know for each one? Go with what feels most natural when you’re saying the word.

The main thing is don’t force the -ed sound at the end of the word because it’s that that gives you an unnatural rhythm when you’re speaking English. So moving on to — this one’s an observation, really. British English pronunciation. We have so many different accents in England. But one of the biggest divisions in our accents is — it’s between the north of the country and the south, and it’s our pronunciation of these words: “bath” and “laugh”, as I say them. I say them in the southern pronunciation. But if I were from the north — if I were from the north of the country, I’d say “bath” and “laugh” because they have a different accent up there. Well, they’ve got loads of different accents, but they don’t speak in the same way as me. So let’s break it down into the actual sound. So if you’re from the North, you say, “a”. But we, in the South, say “au”. So you say “bath”, we say “bauth”. And you say “laf”; we say “laugh”. And you can also hear it in these two words. It doesn’t have to be the first or only a vowel in the word.

In the southern pronunciation, this is “commaund”. But in the northern pronunciation, it’s “command”. And the southern pronunciation of this word is “caust”. The northern pronunciation is “cast”. The cast of Brookside came to London.” “Brookside” was an old soap that’s not on TV anymore, and it was people from Liverpool. And I was just doing the accent. Probably that’s really irrelevant to you.

You will never see that show, but anyway. You know, now. Next tip. I don’t hear this that often, but when I do, it sounds really, really, really wrong. And I think this tip generally — generally a good example of how — just because we write something one way doesn’t mean we say it that way. So in English — American English, too — W sounding words are the same as the “wh” sound in words for spelling. It actually sounds the same. So we’ve got two words here, “wine” and “whine”.

One is spelled with WH, and one is just spelled with I. “Whine” is a kind of moan or a kind of cry. Sometimes, young children whine. Sometimes, women who are upset about something are said to be “whiny”. So we don’t really say that men whine. That’s probably a bit sexist. But, yeah. The point is they sound the same but are spelled differently. So I’ve sometimes heard people try to make the “wh” sound like “hwhine” or something like that or in these words, “which” and “witch” are the same. Some people might say “hwhich”. And that used to be a feature of British English. If you listen to some speakers of British English from a long time ago, like around the 1920s — T.

S. Eliot, although he wasn’t British, he did acquire a really strange British accent. And when he spoke English, he would make the “hwhich” sound. And that was a standard feature of the accent then. But if you say it now, it just sounds a bit weird. So don’t be making the “hwh” sound. And here, two commonly spoken words with that “hwh” sound that you shouldn’t say — so you should say “what” without “hwhat, hwhat, hwhat do you want?” That would be awful.

And “hwhere” — don’t say that. Just say it without the H sound. Let’s take a look at the pronunciation of -ing word endings. So in just relaxed, informal speech, I feel that a lot of dialects don’t pronounce the G. So it would be like this. “I was listening to some music.” You don’t hear the G there. But if we’re making an effort to speak properly and with very good enunciation, you would hear the G slightly. It would sound like this, “I was listening to a wonderful lecture yesterday.” And you hear my G. It’s very soft, but it’s there. Something to say about British English pronunciation is — again, this is a north-south difference — is that they, up there, some of the accents ring the G, so it’s, like, “listening, speaking.

I was speaking to him.” And if that’s a feature of your accent, that’s a feature of your accent. But in standard English, you don’t ring it. You don’t make an extra “guh” or “juh” sound at the end. So the standard way to make the G sound, “reading.” But I’m just letting you know that in relaxed and informal speech, many times, we don’t hear the G. So when we come back we’ll look at the other four rules or tips — tips, really. Tips and observations about pronunciation. Tip No. 5, when we’re saying a word with two or more syllables, very often, the second syllable is not stressed, and it’s what we call a “schwa”. So even though all these words have a different spelling for the second syllable, they become a schwa.

So what some people do is they’ll say the word. And a good example is this word. They will say “En-gland”. But actually, it sounds like this “England”. So the vowel changes to a schwa, and then, it’s — another way to look at it is it becomes a softer sound. So let’s say some of the words. “London”, not “Lon-don”. “London, England, together”, not “togeth-er”. “Together”. “Button”, not “butt-on”. “Button”. “Cousin”. So that’s the schwa, and supposedly the most common sound in the English language, and it’s a pretty confusing sound as well because it’s always spelled in different ways, and it doesn’t actually sound exactly the same when it moves around into different words. So not an easy one to get familiar with. So the main thing to take away from it is that don’t put that very big stress on all your syllables in the word. It won’t sound right.

No. 6, tip No. 6, British English is a non-rhotic accent. This is the sound /r/. In your language, maybe you do that thing where you roll your tongue which I can’t do. I just — I so can’t do it. So like how I can’t do that sound, you might find it really hard to make that sound without rolling your tongue. Okay. It’s hard. Pronunciation is not easy. But you can always work at something and train yourself. So when we make the R sound, the position of the tongue is quite far back in the throat. R, R, R. And it doesn’t have that rhotic sound. And in some dialects, for example, in Scottish, you do hear it. So I’m going to say this sentence in a Scottish accent, “The murderer wore red.” Sorry, Scottish people. But they put the R sound in. I kind of did it then. Maybe I can do it after all. But in my accent, I would say, “the murderer wore red.” So we don’t roll our tongues. And that’s something — if you want to speak standard British English, you could work on that R if you do it.

So if you’re Arabic or if you’re Spanish, Italian as well, you could work on that sound. No. 7, now. So this is a hard sound. I’m going to have to be honest with you. It’s a hard sound for me because I’m a Londoner, and I’m from South London, and we’re not very — we don’t like this sound very much. We like to replace it with an F sound. I’m not too bad making this sound at the beginning of a word, “three”, “thought”, “think”. But sometimes, it’s quite hard for me, like in this word. I want to say “birfday” with an F, but it should be “birthday”. It’s really hard for me. But it’s not just hard for me; it’s hard for people all over the world.

Maybe we should just get rid of this sound. We don’t need it anymore. Some people replace it with D. I’ve got an Italian student who replaces it with D. So he would say “dirty dree”. That’s not an Italian restaurant, but — restaurant? Italian restaurant? Why am I thinking about food? It’s not an Italian accent. Because he can’t say “th”, he replaces it with /d/. But other people might replace it with /v/ as well. So a tip for making the “th” sound, you put your tongue between your teeth. And it’s a kind of whisly sound without the /f/. Your lip is more pursed at the top. So you don’t want to do that when you’re making the “th”. Just try it. I’ll say the words for you. “Three”, “thumbs” — thumbs up if you can make that sound — “birthday”, “thought”, “think”, “bath”. It’s hard for me. I’m trying. I’m trying with you.

We’re learning together today. And rule No. 8, “can’t”. Oh, that’s meant to have that there. A lot of people get confused because sometimes they think, “Did you say a negative there, or did you say the positive?” They get really confused. In British English, we don’t always say the T. We don’t always pronounce the T in this word “can’t”. So it might sound like this, “I can’t understand you.” But it might also sound like this, “I can understand you.” And when I said it the second way, you didn’t hear the T. And the reason that happens is speech just become as little bit more fluid, a little bit more easy to say without the T.

But you don’t need to be confused because, actually, the opposite of “can’t” is “can”. And /caen/ is a different vowel. It’s /ae/, whereas this vowel is /a/. So they would sound completely different. It would be, “I can’t understand you.” Very different to “I can’t understand you” or “I can understand you.” So when you’re listening out for that negative sometimes, know that we might say it with or without a T.

So thank you everybody for watching today. You can do a little bit of extra practice on the EngVid site for this lesson. And if you do like my lesson, please do subscribe because I make lots of different lessons, not just about pronunciation but all other things about learning English as well that I think will be very education and very useful for you in your general development as a learner of English or someone who’s just trying to improve your English. And I’m finished now, so I’m going to go. I’m going to go now, okay? I’ll see you later.. “}

As found on Youtube

Neuro Linguistic Programming in Brighton

Steps to Learning English: Where should you start?

{“en”:”[Singing] Hi. James. Greer. James Greer. From engVid. [Laughs]. Not Bond, and I know you think I was going to say Bond. I know. But listen, Bond always has an important mission he’s got to do, right? 007. And so do I. Today we have a mission. We’re going to learn how to study English. I know in many places, many websites, they tell you, and to teach you grammar and idioms and phrasal verbs.

But then, there’s the big question of you, and: How do you study, and how do you choose what is important for you at this moment? Maybe you’re advanced. Maybe you’re a beginner. Maybe you know this, and maybe you don’t. After today’s lesson and we do our mission, you’ll know exactly what you have to do. Okay? So, we’re going to go to the board in a second, and take a look. What steps should we take in order to learn? By the time you’re done this video, you’ll know exactly… Or you should know where you are, where you need to go, and when you’re going to be done. Ready? Let’s go. E. E is standing here saying: “Where do I start? Grammar, vocabulary, or speaking?” Common, and seems to make sense, I mean, you go to learn a language-right?-you go on a website, they start throwing things at you. You go to a school, they say you need this, this, and this.

But you don’t really know. So, I’m going to give you the tools to decide that. First thing we’re going to do is: What’s the first thing you need? Grammar? No. What? Conversation? No. Vocabulary. What? Well, look. If you can’t say: “bathroom” when you go to a country, you’re going to pee yourself. Okay? “Hungry”, you won’t get food. You don’t need to know everything to get basic information done. And that’s what we should look at first. Basic information for a beginner really is vocabulary. And instead of all the fancy stuff you need, you don’t need much. You need you, and a little bit of time, and to have some fun. Why? I’m going to suggest: For basic communication, get vocabulary. I’m telling you right now if I see you or any English-speaking person sees you, and you see… You say: “Drink. Thirsty.” There’s no grammar, but they’ll go: “Oh, the bar is over there.” If you say: “Washroom. Please”, they’ll go: “Oh, toilet is over there.” They use sentence, you use words.

Sometimes you just touch your belly and go: “Ahh!” They’ll go: “Oh, you want food.” You don’t need all that stuff. People will tell you you need to learn grammar, and this and that. You don’t. And here’s how you get your first vocabulary. Do what you love to do. Play video games. I’ve had… I don’t know how many students play video games, say they learned how to fire, duck, words that we wouldn’t teach them for a while, because they were playing games. Other people come in: “Dah-dah-dah-dah-dah, [sings]”, singing. I go: -“What the hell?” -“I love to sing”, and they sing a song, they sound like they’re just, you know, from this country.

Then they speak very terrible accent. You know what I’m saying, right? [Laughs] But when they sing, it’s like the gods have come down. I mean, literally, you go: “Are you…? You were born here, right?” Cool slang. You know? YOLO, you only live once. Right? ASAP, as soon as possible. When you do these things, you’re learning because you want to learn. You’re not even realising you’re learning, and it’s going to make you want to learn more because… You know, we’ll get to the second one and you’ll understand. But you want to communicate in a much better way. Okay? So, get the meaning of basic words. “Hungry”, “food”, “toilet”, “money”. You know that one, right? You need those things. If you have those things, you can start your adventure in learning English. Okay? And you’re going to do it by doing things you love. Video games, music, cool slang.

Right? Come on. Now we’re making language fun and easy for you, and that’s what we should do, because you’ll learn it faster. All right? And then here’s the bad news: Hard work is on its way, so let’s move over to the intermediate. So if you’re still on vocabulary and you can’t put a sentence together, you’re a beginner. Okay? But at least you’re better than other people. You know words in a foreign language. Cool. Intermediate is when we start, and I think you should introduce grammar. This is when your vocabulary is rich enough that you can say things like: “Need water.” Where? It’s not a sentence, so you kind of sound stupid. I’m saying it right out. You sound stupid. Had many students, brilliant people, sounding like… I called them kids. And I loved them. I thought they were great people, but I would call them kids because they sound like two and five year olds.

“Mommy, water, now.” Understand. Sentence? Not really. Grammar. Some teachers don’t think it’s necessary. It is. It’s like a skeleton in a body. Right? When you’re crawling on the floor, you still need a skeleton, something to hold everything together, but really it’s the muscles and everything else that make you move. But the skeleton is necessary or needed. Those are those bones. Right? These are the bones of the language. You got, you know, your vocabulary, but these hold everything together, that skeleton. Now, when you learn grammar, we do this to be understood.

We said basic communication. To be understood we need grammar. This is sound… And you can sound like you understand. “Oh! I can’t have your girlfriend and all of your money? Oh. I didn’t know that. I understand.” You sound like you understand someone. You can communicate an idea. “I would like to be a millionaire, but I don’t want to work.” See? I’ve communicated: “I am lazy, but I still want to be rich.” Like everyone in North America. Okay, but we’re going to take our vocabulary…

See, this is when you have the vocabulary, you take it, and you put it with some muscle. You put vocabulary and function words. That’s what grammar is. It’s the words that function. It’s the verbs. Right? It’s the pronouns. It’s all these things that go together. It’s like making a hamburger. Okay? You got your meat. Now you need a bun, some lettuce, and everything else. This is your grammar. This makes it good. Okay? So, now you can sound pretty intelligent, not like a child, but some people have great grammar skills and good vocabulary, but-and this is where we go to the advanced-they don’t sound like us.

They still haven’t got it quite together. We know you’re not from here. This is change it all. And this is something that I find interesting. Some students don’t want to do, they think it’s a waste of time. And then I remind them: In your country, are there people who don’t know how to read and write? What do you call them? Some people say (this is a fancy word): “They are illiterate.” I say: “No. They’re stupid.” Because you say: “Hey, read this.” They go: “I cannot read.” You go: “You’re stupid. Didn’t you go to school, stupid?” Don’t be stupid. Learn to read and write. It’s not just for that reason, for your ego that people…

It makes you feel good. It’s also because it teaches you how to think in the language. Huh? Well, when you write something down, you have to remember the author wrote it three years ago. The author is the writer of the book, could be a male, female, or whoever made it. They wrote it three or four years ago, and you’re not there. So when they write about it, they have to think in a way that you would understand it three years later, and not have to ask questions.

Because if you have to say: “I’m confused. What does he mean? Let me call him up. Yo, E, on page 47 you wrote this thing. It’s an awkward phrase. You got a dangling modifier, so I’m not really sure…” It doesn’t work like that. They have to write it properly so you understand it. This is when we become advanced, because you learn logical thought, how we put it together. When we talk about logical thought, we talk about syntax; how the words go together , how things flow, how we think. Every language is different, and the syntax is a bit different. Okay? This will make you think like a native speaker. You have to put the words and even the sentences in a way that makes sense to us. Okay? Remember I said you sound…? Here I meant not stupid. That was it, you don’t sound stupid. Reading and writing makes you sound intelligent, and there’s a difference.

Suddenly, I want to hear what you have to say, because you seem to know what you’re talking about, and you present your ideas in a way I can understand. It also gives you the time to think about the language, so it goes on in your brain, so it knows how to analyze and present the language for us. This is something people skip, because they want to speak, and don’t realize this is a very important part. Reading gives you an understanding of how we’re thinking. You read, you get that. When you write, you have to write in a way that we would understand it. Powerful stuff. And how does it do that? Well, we have three components or three parts. Number one, the grammar. See? Grammar we talked about. Grammar has to be in something you write. Okay? Then it has to be true.

What you say has to make sense to us. It’s logical. I can’t be just: “I am an alien, and I live in the sea, and I have fins and baby-back ribs.” It doesn’t make any sense, even if the sentence is perfectly grammatically correct. It’s like: “This is not true. I will not listen to you.” And then finally we have to connect them, and this is what we talk about syntax, and when we put all of these things together, suddenly you’re speaking and people understand you. Accent or no accent, you are an English speaker. Not quite. Almost. When we put all these three together, and we go to speaking, and you master speaking, which will happen if you take these steps – you will notice you are being understood when you speak. Not five times: “Sorry? Huh? Sorry? Sor-, sorry? Oh, okay. Oh, I’m sorry. No. Sorry?” No. You will speak, you will be understood. When I speak, and some of you think I speak very quickly. And you’re right. My students actually often laugh go: “You don’t speak quickly on those videos.

You speak quickly in real life.” But I like it when people understand me. You will find that you understand me more. You will have more understanding what I say, and English people say. You won’t be guessing what they’re saying. You will actually understand them. Finally, you know that accent that you really don’t like, and you wish you could get rid of? You will. Speaking and using a practice of speaking helps you with proper pronunciation. That’s what helps you with being understood, and actually helps you with understanding other people, because you realize it’s not the absolute pronunciation, but where you put the stresses, what the meaning is. Right? All this comes with language or speaking. You can communicate and have mastered the language. That’s what we talk about by speaking, and I wrote that for a reason. When you are speaking, it’s right or it’s wrong. There’s no time to think about it. That’s what your practice in reading and writing is for.

Okay? So once you can actually speak, you’re done. Congratulations. You’ve learned a new language. Now, look. I want to do… I want to go through a couple of hints to help you out in a second or two, and then I want you to go out there and practice. Figure out where you are. You’ll know, because I’ve already told you. You’re either a beginner and you got to work on your vocabulary. That means most of what I said you didn’t understand. Or you’re intermediate, you got something out of what I’m saying, but you know you can’t express yourself that way. You’re advanced, you’re already smart enough to be writing every day and reading every day.

Or you’re basically fluent and native. Get outta here. Go outside and play. That’s what you should be doing. You ready? Let’s go through those helpful hints. [Snaps] So, we’ve talked about where you might be as a learner; advanced, beginner, or native. Now, I want to give you some more basic hints on acquiring or getting the language. Are you ready? Okay, basic hint number one: 30 minutes a day goes a long way. Whether you’re a beginner, intermediate, or advanced, 30 minutes. If you’re not willing to spend 30 minutes learning, you really don’t want to learn. All right? You need to practice regularly. Give you a good hint or a good example. When you were a baby, you were trying to walk. You would fall down. You would never stand and walk, you kept falling. But every day you tried, and sometimes hours, hours, hours.

Then one day, you started to walk, then you started to run. If you told that baby that 30 minutes a day was a lot of work, you’d be sitting in a chair for the rest of your life. Right? So, 30 minutes a day. Hey, an engVid video is 15. Boo, half your work’s done. Am I a genius? Yeah. Helped you out. Okay, so 30 minutes a day is a good thing to do. Okay? It goes a long way to help you retain or remember the information. Number two: Spend five minutes and review what you did the day before.

I know, it’s 35 minutes, but it’s still not an hour. Okay? So, before, you know, you do your new lesson, think for five minutes: “What did I do yesterday when I did English? Did I…?” Was it…? Were you reading? Did you write? What did you write about? Were there any things you wanted to change in your writing? Okay? So, remember, in your 30 minutes, that can be 30 minutes of writing, 30 minutes of reading, 30 minutes of going through the dictionary looking for words you need, basic words. Right? Or, I don’t know, listening to, like I said, an engVid video.

Watching it twice. The first time, you watch it; second time, make notes about things you want to learn .Right? That’s 30 minutes. Painless. Five minutes review is good, because it’s like eating food. If you take a burger, just put it in your mouth, it’s not as good as when you take it, and chew it and taste it. When you taste it, that’s where the joy comes from. That’s what you should do with language. Just taste it. Play with it a bit. Number three: Imagine yourself in a situation where you have to use the English you’ve learned. That could be part of your 30 minutes. Read for a little while, stop, put the story in your head, close your eyes, and imagine it. If you imagine it, it becomes real. When it becomes real, it becomes useful. Okay? If you just write some grammar down and you write some rules, and you never think about using it, then guess what? You won’t.

So, why don’t we take a couple minutes with our review? Imagine. Okay? “I just learned this new vocabulary. James said something about a pharmacy. Now, imagine I had to go… What did he say I have to say? ‘Can you help me with…?'” Now, imagine asking the… There you go. Next thing you know, you’re in the situation, the words come out of your mouth. Practice. Number four: Set goals. What do you want to do with your English? I know.

“I want to speak English today.” It’s not going to happen. Sorry. Okay? Just like if you want a burger, you have to actually catch a cow, kill a cow, bring it to the store, grind it up or make meat for it, then put it on the barbecue. It doesn’t happen. Right? There’s many steps to it. So, in this case, set goals. Maybe a five-minute conversation with a native speaker. Two-minute, one-minute conversation. Maybe it’s learn turn… Ten words really well. Okay? So you read a book, you pick out ten words you don’t know, go to the dictionary, write it out, then write out sentences with those words. Talk to…

Try and use them in a conversation with somebody so that they become something you’ve digested, that means taken in and you understand. Okay? You understand it completely. Apply for a job. Here’s one. You… It’s the 21st century, bub. Get on the internet. “I would like to work for your company.” Send it out. Right? See what responses you get back. Now, most of them will say: “Hey, your grammar is really bad.” Right? Or you can do a phone interview. Say: “Hey, can we do a Skype interview for this job?” Practice. Just because you’re not living here right now doesn’t mean you can’t put it into practice. And through your mistakes, you can learn, and then go back and use that for your 30 minutes of work. Right? “They didn’t like my accent. It was too strong. Okay, work on pronunciation. They said my grammar skills seemed to be a bit weak.

Okay, work on grammar skills. My vocabulary was limited. I noticed I kept repeating the same thing. Okay, work on vocabulary. Work on synonyms.” You will start making your own lesson plan based on you, not on what some book or some teacher tells you to do. Finally: Travel. I should do, like, say this. Right? Travel. I know. This is not easy. You don’t have money. Right? You don’t have time. But why are you learning it? Everything you really want, you have to do something. We call it a sacrifice. You have to give something to get something you really want. You want to eat, you buy food.

The food’s not free. Right? You want to really use your language, you got to travel. You don’t have to be… Do a big trip. You can find things on the internet where it’s exchange. Somebody’s family comes to your house, you go to their house for two weeks, or something like that. Governments do exchanges where there’s learning programs. Right? Hey, you can go to startup programs. “Hi. I want to learn English. Send me to a country.” Some people, if you give a good enough story: “I live in a farm out in Lithuania.

My family is, you know… Always wanted me to do better with my life, and we know English is important. So, my father’s willing to give up three cows to have me go to Canada.” Put it out there. Somebody will go: “Oh, come on, man. I’ll give you the money.” You know, miracles happen. Things can happen, but you got to do something. Travelling is the one thing that makes you go out there, because you got to do something. You can’t pretend you want to learn, because you have to put your money there. That will be hard, and I admit that. But once you do, if you’re doing all of these things, there’s nothing sweeter than getting off a plane, and saying: “Hi. Can you help me this? I’m looking for a friend of mine”, and the other person going: “Sure, no problem.

Let me take you.” And you’re understood. Right? Cool? I think it’s cool. Anyway, where do I start? You know where to start now, whether you’re a beginner, intermediate, advanced, or you’re native. I’ve given you some helpful hints that you can use starting right this minute. Right? You’re watching one video, so 15 minutes of your time is done. Hit the next one, or go do the quiz.

All right? Cool. Listen, hope I’ve done my part for you. Now it’s time for you to do your part. Study, practice, review. And when you can and if you can, and if you can get the help, travel, see the world. All right? Listen, I got to go. You have a great day. All right? Don’t forget to do the quiz. Where? www, eng, as in English, vid, as in video. I probably did that backwards. Right? engVid. Doesn’t matter. You know. Go to www.engvid.com. Don’t forget to subscribe. It’s somewhere around here. Somewhere. Subscribe. And once again and always, thank you very much for being a part of our family. All right? Have a good one. Ciao.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Learn English with Alex

{“en”:”Hey guys. I’m Alex. Thanks for clicking on my channel. If you’re here, it’s probably because you’re interested in improving your English in some way. You’ve come to the right place. Down below, you will find many videos about English grammar, English vocabulary, pronunciation, writing skills, speaking skills, and a wide variety of things related to the English language. So if you never want to miss a video, please subscribe to my channel and I’ll always be here! Thanks, guys. Good luck, and take care!. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Learn English – Travel Vocabulary

{“en”:”Hi. James, from EngVid. I was just about to plan my vacation. I’m going to take a long flight to Europe. I’m trying to remember luggage and baggage things, you know? It’s kind of hard to do. But this is a lesson for you if you’ve been working a lot, you need some time off. Now, there’s a video I would like you to go check out. That’s on time off. It goes with this one. You might want to go away somewhere and not just stay home, right? So this video is for you. This is basic vocabulary on vacation. When you leave and maybe you go to an English speaking country and you want to practice your English, this stuff will be good for you to enjoy your time there, also to make it easy for you when you arrive. Are you ready? Let’s go to the board. Mr. E, Mr. E! It’s a mystery where he is. It’s no mystery. And you thought I forgot. Mr. E has been on vacation with me, and he’s enjoying this particular attraction.

So let’s go to the board. Now, if you’re going to go on vacation, one of the first things you will have to do if you’re leaving your country is you’re going to need some travel documents. What are those? Documents. A “document” is a paper or something with information that tells you something is okay or outlines it for you. For example, your passport is a document given by the government with your picture on it that says you are a citizen of this country, and you are legal. You are a good person. Okay? Now, when you’re leaving for a flight, or you want to go to another country, you’re going to need travel documents first.

Trust me; show up at the airport and go, “I leave now. I go to Canada.” They will go, “And the car is that way. Go home, crazy man. Okay?” So we need travel documents. So what are “travel documents”? Well, “travel documents” would be your passport, government identification, usually needed at most places the travel. Inside of a country, not necessary for most places. But leaving the country, you have to have it. Okay? So if you’re in the European Union, no problem.

If you’re in Canada and the United States, you don’t need one. But as soon as you leave these countries, you need a passport. What’s another thing you need? Well, you need what’s called a “boarding pass”. If you play soccer, you kick the ball; the other guy, he catches it; you “pass” right? The ball goes from one player to another. A “boarding pass” is what allows you to go from one country to another country. You show the person on the airplane this piece of paper with your passport, and they say, “You know what? You can come on the plane and fly, like the pass.” Kick, catch, other country. Cool? All right. So these are your travel documents. You need those. Now, I should have started with you need to make a plan because you want to go visit some place. You want to go on vacation, right? And if you want to go on vacation, well, going to have to — I said “vacation”. A “vacation” is a holiday, another word for saying “time off from work”. All right? So you want to go on vacation. Sometimes, we say, “We’re going to vacation in Italy.” Or “on my vacation, I want to visit Italy.” Or “I’m taking a holiday in Italy.” Okay? So all these words, when people say, “Well, what are you doing on your time off?” You might go, “I’m going on vacation.” Then they know you’re leaving.

If you just say, “I’m taking time off from work”, you could be home cleaning. But no. You’re saying, “I’m going on vacation.” They’re going to go, “Where are you going to visit? Italy, perhaps? Sicily? Is it going to be a good holiday?” And you go, “Yes. I earned my time.” “Earned” means to work for something. “I earned my time off. I’m going on vacation.” You need a boarding pass, and you need a passport. You know where you’re going. What else is important for a vacation? Usually, you need money.

But when you ask for the money in a different country, we don’t say, “Money. Do you have money?” They will say, “Yes.” And they will say, “Do you have money?” And you will say, “Yes.” But it means nothing. What you need to say is, “What currency do you use?” “Currency” is a very fancy word for “money”. But it means money in a certain country. In Canada, we use dollars. That’s the currency.

In America, they use dollars. But it’s different currency because American and Canadian money are not the same. It’s true. They used to use pesos in Spain. And they also use pesos in Mexico. But the currency was different, meaning the money was different. So you don’t want to say, “What money do I use?” You say, “What currency do I need?” If you go to Europe, you need the euro. If you go to America — United States of America for those people who are very, very special — you use the American dollar, which is not to be confused with the Australian dollar. Careful, right? Not every country has it. I mean, I went to one place — I went to Florence.

I was thinking, “Florence. Do I go to a florist and buy a flower and exchange it?” No that was their currency. All right? Now, when you want to take your money and give it to somebody else and say, “I want your money. What do I need to do?” They will say, “Okay. To get this — oh, sorry. To get this money — Canadian money. See? It’s red and white like our flag — you need two of your poor dollars!” So when you do an exchange rate, it tells you how much of your money do you need to get someone else’s money, or how much of your currency do you need to get someone else’s currency.

I know it seems a little confusing, but trust me. Once you leave your country, these things are going to be things you’re going to go, “I wish somebody told me.” And I’ll say, “I did tell you. You just weren’t listening.” Okay? You need currency to go to different countries. So a good thing to do before you get your flight is to say, “What currency do they use in that country?” Believe me, you don’t want to find out by accident you don’t have the right currency.

It happened to me. Okay. So we’ve got currency; we’ve got our documents; we have to, what we call, “book our flight” or “book our trip” or “our travel arrangements”. Okay? Because you’ve got — you know where you want to go. You’ve got this stuff all going. You need to get your flight. So the flight — they’ll give you the time, the airport — the place where the airplane will be and will land, okay? — and your return. You might have a return ticket or a one-way.

Didn’t talk about that? You should ask this. “Return” means you can come home, all right? You can come home. If you get one-way — [singing] “I’m on a highway to hell!” You ain’t coming back, son! And people ask questions when you buy a one-way ticket. They go, “And when do you plan on coming back, hmm?” Okay? So when you make your travel arrangements or you flight or your trip, okay, this is when you’ll get your boarding pass, right? You’ll do that; they will print up your travel document. It’s called your “itinerary”. An “itinerary” tells me what time the plane will arrive, what time I must be at the airport — not the same. Three hours for international; two hours for domestic. “Domestic” means in the country, okay? All of this will be in your itinerary. Itinerary. I’m going to do that later — no. I’ll do it now. “Itinerary.” I-tin — like a can — er-ary. Okay? Itinerary. It’s one word. And what this means is your arrangements or organization of your travel. And airports will give you an itinerary when you book a flight.

See we have the word here? You book a flight or book your trip, which means you call them and say, “I want to go here at this time.” When you’re ready and you pay your money, they will give you an itinerary which will tell you when you’re flying, when you’re leaving, what airport, how much. And it also, when you’re finished, says you have paid, so you can get your boarding pass and get on the plane. So you’ve got your itinerary. We’re ready to go. What’s next? Well, you’re going to go to the airport. And when you go there, I want you to be aware of something.

It’s called your “luggage” or “baggage”. Depending on what was on your itinerary, it might say how many bags you can take. That’s another thing on your itinerary. There are two types. There are “baggage” and “carry-on”. It’s not exactly the same, and you have to be very careful when you go on vacation. “Carry-on” means you, on your body, can walk on the airplane, and then sit down, put it on the overhead, okay? “Carry-on” is on you. You keep it with you, with your passport. Go on the plane. And then you can put it above. This is not the same as your “luggage” or “baggage” that is — you come with. This is what you’re allowed to.

Sometimes, you’re allowed one. Sometimes, you’re allowed two. You better check because it will really make your vacation very expensive. And I’ll tell you why in a second. If you have luggage, usually, you take it to the airport. You give it to someone. It disappears. And you don’t see it again until you get to the new country. They say, “Carry-on? Do you have anything for carry-on?” You say, “Yes. This bag.” And you walk, and they go, “Okay.” Then, the other one, they take away and say, “Bye-bye, bag! I’ll see you in the new country.” So you got on the carry-on. You’ve got your boarding pass. You walk up with passport. They let you in. Okay? You board. “Board” means you can go on the plane. When they say, “Geraldine Potter, boarding now. Flight 57 is boarding. Ready to leave, to depart.” That’s you. You get on the plane. Okay? So you board the plane, give them your documents. Finally, you’re on the plane. You’re relaxing. The plane comes. It arrives, and comes down.

What’s the first place you go to? Customs. Customs. You get off the plane. They announced you. You showed your passport one time. They’re going to say do you, “Do you have a passport, please, sir? Can we see your passport?” And you have to show the passport again before you can come in the new country. So once you get to Italy, you can’t just walk into Italy. You have to go to customs and show your passport. Then, you can enter, and we can finally begin our vacation. Well, what are you going to do on vacation? You didn’t just go there to go to a hotel. And a “hotel” is a place you pay to sleep at night. And you can buy some food, but you just sleep there. Okay? Or maybe, you have family there.

I didn’t draw a hotel because, well, you probably are going with family, and hotel — you probably know that before you go because you can’t just show up and kind of go, “Okay. I sleep where, now?” You get a hotel. So a hotel or motel are places that you go to. Motels are a little bit cheaper. And hotels are more expensive but can be nicer with bathtubs and everything.

Magnifique. Okay? But they’re places you pay to stay to sleep at night. Okay? There’s also something called “hostel”. Not “hostage”, okay? Not “hostage”. Let’s not go there. “Hostel”. A “hostel” is usually used by students or people who have backpacks that they carry, and they’re very, very cheap, but many people share rooms or showers. So you can spend more money and go to a hotel. Middle money — think “motel” is “middle money”. Not so nice, but you have your own bathroom and your own bed.

And “hostel”, well, everybody sleeps together. Well, no. They don’t. I’m just saying everybody sleeps in a similar room and has the same shower, okay? Those are your three things you can do. So after you get up from your hotel, motel, hostel, you might want to, well, go sightseeing. See the glasses? “Sightseeing” is when you go to places of interest in a country, usually places that are called “tourist attractions” — “attraction”, like a magnet, brings tourists. In Canada, we have the CN Tower. Or in Seattle, the Seattle Space Needle.

Or in Paris, the Arc De Triomphe. Okay? These are places where people go, “Did you go to see MoNA, the Museum of Natural –?” They ask you because you should go to these places in these countries, all right? So if you say to someone, “Hey. I want to go sightseeing. Do you know of any tourist attractions?” They’ll go, “Yes. My house at twelve o’clock. The freaks come out at night.” Joking. What they’ll say is, “Yeah. You should go to this place, Yonge Street. Or this place. And here are some things you’ll like when you get there.” Okay? Now, be careful. Although there are tourist attractions, there are also what we call “tourist traps”. These are places where you spend lots of money for nothing.

You will notice people in the country never go there because they go, “Oh, it’s too much money, and all the tourists are there.” Which means, it’s just made for tourists. It doesn’t mean it’s fantastic or great. It just means there are people there who know tourists are coming, who probably speak foreign languages, and they want to take most of your money. So make sure you make a difference or you ask a local in the country, “Hey. Is this a tourist attraction or a tourist trap?” And you’ll know that because especially if you want to practice your English, there will be more people speaking your language at tourist traps than at tourist attractions. Sometimes, there will be people to help you. But you know, be careful. Now, you’ve gone to attractions, you’ve gone sightseeing. You’ve missed the tourist traps. I’m sorry; your vacation is over. Almost like this lesson. That means you’ve got to go back home.

So you’re going to have to board the plane again, take your luggage, get your carry-on, make sure you have your travel documents — your boarding pass and your passport, okay? “Bye, Italy! It was a nice vacation. I’ll visit you again.” My holiday is over, so Mr. E and I, well, we’re going to take our flight back to our country. It’s going to be a long — see, a long flight is usually, like, hours. A short flight could be an hour. But we really enjoyed the trip. And we love traveling, okay? I’m going to tell my friends about this airline I use because they have a great itinerary.

When I come back to my country, oh, damn it! I have to go through customs again. When you come back, you have to go through with your stuff and show them. Go to customs. But finally, maybe I have some money left. I have their currency, not their money. So I’ll have to go and find out what the exchange rate is, change my money back to my real money, and my trip is over. I hope you enjoyed this little trip. Mr. E, of course, you did. I’ve got some pictures of you and me away, huh? Drinking some beer, yes? In some good countries! Anyway. It’s been a pleasure. And I need you to go somewhere — take a little trip. It’s not much of a flight. But it’s sort of like a vacation because you’re going to learn a different language — English. You don’t need any documents, and you don’t have to go to customs. I want you to go to www.engvid.com.

That’s right. I said it, people. “Eng” as in “English”, “vid” as in video”. That’s EngVid, where you can find myself and other teachers who will take you on a fabulous journey — that’s a word we didn’t use here, a “journey” to English. Don’t forget to watch out for tourist traps, okay? Don’t be a tourist. Come stay with us. We’ll educate you. Have a good one. E! Out!. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

2 fun new ways to learn English vocabulary

{“en”:”Yeah, that was fun. I’m looking forward to hearing that from you later. Hi. James from engVid. In this video what I would like to do is help you work on vocabulary. I want to make it fun, because when things are fun, you work harder and you learn more. And today’s lesson, I’m going to teach you two ways to not only just remember vocabulary, but learn how to use vocabulary in a way that we use it, and you will really understand it, and… Heck, it’s fun. You’re just going to have fun doing it. I’m sure you will. All right? It’s a little bit creative. So, let’s go to the board. Simple lesson. Here we go. Two ways to have fun with language. Not just language, but vocabulary. Ways that you may not be studying in class, we’re going to do here today.

The first one I want to talk to you about is fill in the gap. Huh? “A gap” means a space, there’s a space between something. So, here’s my hands, in between my hands is a gap. Okay? You have a gap between your eyes. One eye, one eye, space. In this case, you see I’ve got this: “tree __________ chair”. Now, fill in the gap doesn’t mean just one word. It’s a couple of ways you can do this. In this particular game, we’re going to take two vocabulary words, “tree”, and take another one, “chair”, and they’re kind of a little obvious to make it easy for you, but what I want you to do is one of two things. The first thing we can do is use x words. What I mean by that is you could say: “I want to use five words, and I want to go from ‘tree’ to ‘chair’.” Or: “I want to use three words from ‘tree’ to ‘chair'” or two. Huh? Well, okay. How do I get from “tree”? Okay. “Tree”, “cut”. You cut the tree down, right? “Lumber”. Lumber you make into wood you can use.

Let’s see. “Carpenter”. Find a carpenter. “Craft”. “Craft” means make. You’re like: “What?” These… All these words… And then I can say: “Furniture”. Okay? Okay, furniture. “Chair”, so if I have a tree, I cut it down and make it into lumber, I take it to a carpenter, he crafts it into a chair. Five words from A to B. So, one game is tell yourself: “I want to go from five… One word to another word, and I want five words to get there.” And you can challenge yourself; maybe go from three words. Right? Or make 10 words. You can use it to describe something. How many words you can use to describe a certain thing. Right? “I have this word, and I want to go to this word. How many words does it take me to get there?” What this does is it teaches you relationship between words, and that also can teach you nouns and verbs, and how they function together.

Or, we say “syntax”, right? So, start at A, say: “I want to use five words to get there.” This is a great word to do with a friend. You can say: “Okay, we’re going to do ‘tree’ and ‘chair’, you need to do five words that make sense to go from ‘tree’ to ‘chair'”, and put a clock on for five minutes. You go, and she goes, you write together and see what words you get. Compare, check them out. “Why did you choose this, and why does this word…? What does this word mean?” Right? So, now, you’re not just writing words in a book and saying: “This word means this.” You’re: “What does it mean? How do I use it? How would other people use it? How would other people think?” Right? Yeah.

See? That’s fun by yourself or with a friend. Okay, listen, the second way to play this game is: How many words to the answer? What? Well, we can pick up two random words, two, like… I have “chair”… “Tree” and “chair”, we could have put “chair” and “moon”. Now the game gets a little bit more interesting. Right? “Chair” and “moon”.

How many words does it get me to go from “chair” to “moon”? Now, you might say: “That’s impossible. They have nothing to do with each other.” I could say, “Listen, the chair in my living room”-“living room” is a noun-“sits”-which is a verb -“close to the big bay window where I can see the moon at night.” How many words did it take me to get from “chair” to “moon”? So, it’s playing with words, being creative.

“Chair” and “moon” have nothing to do with each other, but I used nouns and verbs to go from this place to this place, and actually created a sentence as well. Now, you can, as I said, make it more of a challenge. Do the same thing with a friend. How many words, just random words, how many words does it take? And you can time each other to see who gets there first. And the sentence must make sense. Cool? All right? Once again, you’re going to learn syntax and meaning; you have to put the words in the right order, you can’t just throw words in there. And when I say “meaning”, it has to have sense that it goes from here to here that someone would understand it and, you know, agree with it.

That’s one game. The second game I like a lot, and I’m going to embarrass myself in about four minutes, two minutes, whatever. I hope you like this one, too. I like this one because what you do is if you’re studying particular vocabulary… We have in engVid, vocabulary about travel, the kitchen, the law, all sorts of ones you can go to. Go there, and there’s usually about 10 words. Take those 10 words. Okay? And then you’re going to write a poem. Poem. Well, poems are literary devices. They are types of… They’re forms of writing that don’t have to follow the normal ways of writing. In Japan, they have what’s called a Haiku. We have rhyming poetry, like… I can’t thinking anything off the right… Top of my head. Simple Simon metapimon. No, that’s not a rhyme. But rhyme, words that go together like “time”, “rhyme”, “bime”, you’d have to have all these words kind of go together. Okay? So, poetry could be to express a… Or express a thought or an idea, but it doesn’t have to be written as a specific paragraph. Right? It could be, as I said, a Haiku is in Japanese poetry, rhyming poetry, sometimes abstract poetry.

This is a fun one because in this one you’re going to write a poem, and you might not have done that in your current reading-… Writing assignments. You’re writing paragraphs for essays and things, but we want to show you the connection with words. So, what I want you to do is write a poem using five or maybe even 10 words. Try not to do more, because you’re learning how to write right now. Okay? Use on vocabulary… “One” vocabulary word, because “on” is a preposition.

One vocabulary word on each line, but have the poem’s lines be connected by the ideas in the words, which means you can’t just randomly write words and funny sentences; they’ve got to be connected. This shows your mastery of the language. And that’s why I said this is a good one. It’s fun and you’re showing your mastery. In this case, I’ve got: “rain”, “down”, “heaven”, “hard”, “thirst”. Random words. Right? Let me clear my throat. You didn’t know it, but it’s James’ Beatnik Poetry Cafu00e9. I’m about to give you some lines. Rain comes down hard from heaven, crashing into the ground, making the heart go soft, quenching the thirst of the earth, removing the dirt, revealing the hidden beauty. Thank you. Thank you, thank you, thank you. Okay, so I took these words, and if you noticed, there’s a very specific thing.

This poem I did the first line one word, on the second line I put two words, on the third line I put three words, on the fourth and fifth… You can see these numbers. These were the words I used. Each of them makes sense in the poem. When you hear it, you’re like: “Oh, yeah, that makes sense.” “Heaven” is above, “rain” comes down. Right? “Heaven”, above, yeah. “Hard”, well, when water hits the ground, the ground goes soft. And if you’re “thirsty”, it means you need a drink, if the dry is ground it’s thirsty, so it wants water to drink. Right? I’m showing you I understand the language enough to put these words together. Because I put one word, two words, three words, I also have to use other words I learned. So, you can take this from a particular lesson-right?-because “rain” would be “water” and “thirst”. Probably a lesson on water. Right? Yeah. You could do that for travelling. You know? Sky drawing me up… No, drawing me up into… See? I’m just making it up, but you get the point. You take them, you put them together. And even that last sentence, I’m like: “That wasn’t cool.

I have to… Don’t want to look like a fool, so I’ll have to retool.” Right? So, if you’re smiling, having fun, saying: “Wow. I’m, like, playing with the language.” You’ll show that you understand it, you’ll have a beautiful product that you can show another person, saying: “Look at my English.” And they may be impressed when you explain the rules you were following, like: one words, two words, three words, and how you learned to express yourself and have a deep understanding.

Right? So, look, I hope you’ve enjoyed these two lessons. You can see I did, because I did a little poem for you, using this exact lesson. E’s smiling, because he’s like: “Wow, this is fun.” I’m sure this was fun for you. Give it a try. Get out your vocabulary words, or go watch another engVid lesson. Right? And then take out some vocabulary words, because they do go together, and use them. Make a couple poems, have some fun with it. All right? Anyway, where are you going to find these words? Well, I want you to go to www.eng as in English, vid as in video.com (www.engvid.com), where you can play, have fun, and experiment.

All right? That’s what it’s about, and that’s how you learn best. Anyway, once again, I just wanted to say thank you guys for watching the channel, look forward to all your comments, and the fact that you go do those quizzes. And before I go, I really want you to subscribe, so somewhere around here, or even down here, there’s a subscribe button. Okay? Subscribe, and you’ll get the newest stuff from myself and engVid. Right? Have a good one. See ya later. Remember: Rain comes down hard.. “}

As found on Youtube

Global London College

IELTS General: Writing Task 1 – 14 Top Tips!

Hi. I’m Rebecca from engVid. If you need to do the IELTS general exam, I’m sure it’s for a very important reason. Perhaps you’re trying to immigrate to another country, or get admission to a college program, or join a professional training program. Whatever your reason, I know you want to get the highest marks possible. Right? Of course. So I’m going to help you to do exactly that in one particular area of the exam, and that’s in your writing section. Now, in the writing section there are two parts, one is a letter and one is an essay. In this lesson we will focus on how you can get the highest marks possible in the letter-writing section.

Okay? The 14 tips that I’m going to give you I promise you, if you apply each one of these things, step by step you’re going to get more and more marks. Okay? So stick with me and we will go through them. Let’s get started. So, the first thing you have to identify when you read the letter-writing task is: What type of letter am I being asked to write? Is it a formal letter, is it a semi-formal letter, or is it an informal letter? Well, how do you know that? Well, you can know it in a few ways and I’m going to explain them, but one of the ways that you can know it is to look at the second point that you need to understand, is to identify the purpose of the letter because some purposes are more formal than other purposes. All right? For example, some formal letters might ask you to request information; or apply for a job; or complain about a product or a service, maybe to an airline, maybe to a store, something like that; or to make a suggestion or a recommendation.

All right? To a shopping mall, to a restaurant, something like that. These are more formal situations. These are when we are writing to people or companies that we don’t know. All right? That’s the clue: You don’t have anybody’s name, you just have the name of the company. All right. Semi-formal letters might include things like this: Complaining to a landlord; or explaining something, a problem or a situation to a neighbour; or asking a professor for permission to miss an exam or to submit your assignment late. Whatever it is. Okay? The details vary. Doesn’t matter. And here, what’s…? What identifies the semi-formal? The semi-formal we know it’s still a kind of a formal situation, but here we usually do know somebody’s name.

You would know the name of your landlord, or your professor, or your neighbour, for example. Right? So that means something in terms of the way that you write the letter, the language, the tone, the style. All of this is affected by whether it’s formal, semi-formal, or informal. And I’ll explain more to you as we go along. Now, examples of informal letters might be where you’re being asked to invite a friend, or thank a friend, or apologize to a friend, or ask for advice from someone that you know. Okay? Here what’s important is that you really know this person well and you’re probably going to call them by first name. So I’m going to explain exactly how all of this translates into the next step, which is how you begin your letter. So the first step was to identify the type of letter. Second step, the purpose. Now the third step is to open and close the letter correctly.

Once you’ve done steps one and two, you will know how to do this step. Because if it’s a formal letter then you start with: “Dear Sir” or “Madam”, and you end with: “Yours faithfully”. Okay? That’s how it is. If it’s a semi-formal letter, you will start with something like: “Dear Mr. Brown” or “Dear Ms. Stone” or “Mrs. Stone”. “Ms.” Is when you don’t know if a woman is married or not, or if she’s just a modern woman. And you end the semi-formal letter with something like: “Yours sincerely”. Okay? What we’re trying to do is to match up the formality of the situation with these terms that we’re using. Okay? The opening and closing salutations they’re called, these are called. All right? Next is the informal one. So here, you know the person really well, it’s your friend or a family member, and so you know… You’re going to call them by first name.

Right? So you might say: “Dear John”, “Dear Susan”, and then because it’s a warm friendship or relationship, you can end in a warmer way by saying: “Best regards” or “Warm wishes”. Now, what makes it a little bit easier for you and this is a clue is that usually in your letter prompt, in the task that the IELTS exam gives you, they will give you the letter situation and then they’ll say: “Start your letter with ‘Dear Sir’ or ‘Madam’, or ‘Dear Mr. So-and-so’, or ‘Dear John’.” Now, that helps you a lot because now you know if it’s going to be a formal letter, a semi-formal letter, or an informal letter, and you will know how to end your letter and you’ll also know what to say in your letter and how to say it, which is what we’re going to look at next. Okay, number four: Start the letter appropriately. That means based on whether you decided it was a formal letter, semi-formal, or informal – you need to use appropriate language. Right? Let me give you an example. For formal or informal letters, we could start with something like this: “I am writing to inquire about…” Okay? “I’m writing to inform you that…” whatever the situation is.

Or: “I’m writing in connection with…” Okay? These are some of the standard expressions that we can use when we start formal or semi-formal letters. Look how different that is from the informal ones. Now, what happens in an informal situation? Here we know the people, so first we want to acknowledge the relationship. We don’t start talking about business. Here, these are strangers, we don’t want to waste their time, we don’t want to be friendly here, we just want to get down to business. But here you want to be warm, you want to be friendly because these are people you know.

So you might start with something like this: “I hope you and your family are all well.” Okay? That could be your first sentence. You know what? And in fact in your first paragraph you’re probably just going to talk about nice things, and only in your second paragraph are you going to get down to tell them exactly why you’re writing. Okay? But first you want to say… Tell them… Ask them how they are, and things like that. Another way you could start an informal letter is: “How have you been? It’s been too long since we were last in touch”, and so on.

Okay? This is just to give you some idea. I’m going to later tell you where you can go to refer to sample letters, model letters that you can read so that you really become familiar with the entire format. Okay? All right. Now, number five: Use standard written expressions. What does that mean? Look, the reason it takes you a longer time to write a letter than let’s say someone who has been speaking and writing English all their life is because we have picked up the standard expressions that are used when we write, and you need to try to do that. That will save you a lot of time and it’s very important, of course, on an exam to write as fast as possible.

It’s also important all your life to write email as fast as possible. So, by learning these standard written expressions you will be able to get higher marks and save time and effort. So what are some of these standard expressions? Well, let’s look at one example when we are asked to apologize about something. So if it’s a formal situation, you could say something like: “My sincere apologies for missing the meeting” or “missing the conference”, something like that. Okay? If it was an informal situation and you’re writing to a friend or something like that, you could say: “I’m very sorry for missing your wedding.” Okay? See, you’re still apologizing, but when it’s formal you use certain expressions, and when it’s informal you’re going to use other kinds of expressions.

But these are still expressions which you can learn. And again, you can download a list of these kind of expressions from the resource that I’m going to tell you about. Now, let’s say you are asking for something, you’re making a request, if it’s a formal situation you could say something like: “I’d be grateful” or “I would be grateful if you could please send me the information as soon as possible.” Okay? For example. And if it’s more informal you could say: “Could you please send me the book as fast as you can?” Okay? So you see that the tone varies based on whether it’s formal, informal, or semi-formal. Okay? Let’s look at some other points. Okay, number six: Use correct spelling. Now, you’re going to say to me: “Rebecca, I know that”, and I know you know that, but unfortunately sometimes even on the IELTS students are still making mistakes on words like these which you know you’re very likely to use so you want to make sure that you really know how to spell these words. Of course you can’t know every word you’re going to use, but there are some words you can definitely know will probably be there.

So, for example: “sincerely”, people forget the “e”; “faithfully”, people forget that there’s two l’s; and “connection”, people forget that there are two n’s, that kind of examples. Okay? So just read over… When you read over many sample or model letters you will see and you will find the words which appear very often, and make sure that you know how to spell those words so that you get higher and higher marks which is our goal. Okay, number seven: Divide the letter, your letter into paragraphs.

Now, I know you know that, but let’s just review it. So of course you will have an introduction and you will have a conclusion, and usually IELTS letters in the 20 minutes that you have and in the situation that they’ve asked you to write about, usually IELTS letters have about four paragraphs. Okay? So, introduction, then a second paragraph will be describing the problem or the situation, the third paragraph will move into the solution or what action you’re asking someone to take, and the last one is the conclusion, just the ending. Okay? So make sure you divide your paragraphs… Your letter into paragraphs. Now, when you do that there are two ways to do it. One way is to indent to show that you’re starting a new paragraph.

What does it mean to indent? To start a little bit from the left side. Okay? So don’t start here, start inside. Or you can start every paragraph from the left, what we call flush left, but then you have to leave a line in between to show that this is in fact a different paragraph. Otherwise they… The examiner will think that you’ve written one solid piece of writing in your letter instead of writing in paragraphs. Okay? So make sure you do that. Next: Use clear, legible handwriting. Now, on the IELTS in case you didn’t know, you have to actually write by hand. You can’t use a computer. So you have to make sure that your handwriting is clear and legible. “Legible” means that someone can read it. Don’t write like a doctor, even if you’re a doctor because then the examiner will not be able to understand and won’t be able to give you all the high marks that you want.

So, make sure… Also some people when they’re cursive… For example, when you write with cursive writing-okay?-handwriting which is joined. Right? Some people have difficulty with some of the letters, like “n” and “r”. For example, an “n” or an “r”, if you don’t make it properly it could look like another letter, and then to the examiner that could look like a spelling mistake and then you would lose marks. So make sure your handwriting is clear for this reason that you don’t want the examiner to consider it a spelling mistake, because then they have to reduce your marks.

Okay. Next, you are asked to write and you should write 150 words. How do you know what 150 words is? By practicing and checking lots of times, so practice writing letters. If I had an IELTS exam coming up, I would write a letter and an essay every single day so that I’d feel completely comfortable and confident, I know exactly what I’m going to do, and that’s what you go ahead and do.

And then you will have a feeling and a knowledge of what 150 words is. Okay? Make sure you know. Because if you write less than 150 words, you will lose marks. If you write more than 150 words, you will not lose marks. Okay? So make sure you write at least 150 words. But what’s also important, I said here that if you write more you’ll get… You’ll still be fine, you won’t lose any marks, but you don’t want to spend too much time because you need to finish in about 20 minutes. As I mentioned at the beginning, there are two tasks in your writing section, the letter plus the essay.

The essay is worth twice as many marks, so you want to make sure that you leave enough time, about 40 minutes for your essay. Right? This is also very important. All the marks count. They check… They give you marks separately for the letter and they give you marks separately for your essay, and then they give you a separate score for that, and finally they combine everything. So everything matters, but make sure you finish this part, the letter in 20 minutes. And again, the way to be able to do that is to practice. Practice and practice and practice. So you will write 150 words in 20 minutes and so on.

Okay? With the paragraphs and all the other rules that I told you about. Okay. Now, number 11 tells you to include all three bulleted points. What do I mean by that? If you have looked at some sample letter tasks that appear on the IELTS exam, they give you the situation and then they give you a second section which says: “Include this information in your letter”, and they tell you three points. They’re usually bulleted points. Okay? When they have a little dot like this it means it’s a bullet. And you must do those things. If you don’t do one of these you will definitely lose a lot of marks. So, for example, suppose it was a letter that you’re being asked to write to a landlord. It might say… Or, sorry. You want to write a letter, let’s suppose, to your landlord because the neighbour is making a lot of noise every night and you’re having a lot of problems. So they will say: “In your letter explain the situation”, so you have to make sure you do that. Next: “Describe why it bothers you.” Tell them you’re a student.

I mean, you need to make up a lot of information here. They don’t tell you exactly what to write. Everyone on that… In that examination hall is going to write a different letter, but you have to include certain points. And third, maybe suggest a solution. What are you going to do? So if you leave out one of these, you will lose marks. So don’t do that. Always make sure whatever they have asked you to include, you include, and then include whatever else you have time for that makes sense according to the task you have been given. Okay? And a few more important points which we will cover next. Okay, the last three points, which are also very important for you to get that really high score.

Here we go. We’re going to start from here and go upwards. Okay? There is a reason behind this. Okay, number 12: Understand the scoring criteria. What does that mean? You’re going to get your points, or mark, or grade based on certain things that the IELTS examiners want you to do in this task. So let’s understand what those four things are. Number one is task achievement. That’s a big word which simply means they want you to do everything you’re supposed to do in the letter. Do all. Give a full response. Remember those three points and everything? Make sure you include all the bulleted points, you do what they ask you to do. And that you should write at least 150 words. You will see that in their criteria a lot of the details of it is what I have covered also for you in these 14 points.

All right. Coherence and cohesion. “Coherence” means that you present your ideas logically, it makes sense, you used paragraphs that are structured. Okay? And “cohesion” means that it all goes together in a way that makes sense. For example, your ideas should make sense, they should sort of stick together. And you should use standard expressions that we talked about for apologizing, for thanking, for making a request and so on. Okay? The third point is Lexical resource they call it. What does that mean? That means they want to make sure that you’re using your vocabulary correctly, naturally, fluently. Okay? Lots of varied vocabulary. Not the same words again and again. The last one, they also want to make sure that you use correct spelling. They do minus marks if you get… Make spelling mistakes. Okay? So be careful of that. We’ve talked about it before. And the last one is grammar range and accuracy.

They want you to use varied grammar structures. All right? To write different kinds of sentences; simple sentences, complex sentences, compound sentences. All right? Don’t just write the same kind of sentences. And use correct punctuation and capitalization, which goes with proper English writing. Okay. Now, let’s go upwards. What’s the other really, really important thing that you need to do to get very high marks in this letter-writing section? Write a letter every day. Practice and practice this letter writing. But there’s a second part to that. Practice and get your letters or letter checked by an IELTS teacher. Ideally, an IELTS teacher. Not only an English teacher because not every English teacher has IELTS experience or understands this exam, or the demands of this exam. So the best… Always try to get the best teacher you can get who really knows what you need to do. So, try to get your letters checked by an IELTS teacher because if you keep practicing every day and nobody checks it, that’s tricky. Okay? There are two sections of this exam which you can really cannot prepare for by yourself according to me, and I’ve been teaching for a long time, so they are speaking and writing.

Somebody has to give you feedback. When you get that feedback you will know what you need to improve and correct to get that higher score and also to improve your English. So make sure you get some feedback somewhere along the way so that you know what’s strong and what’s weak. Okay? And last: Read model letters from reliable sources, but don’t memorize them.

Okay? Don’t memorize. Don’t try to memorize the entire letter because you don’t know exactly what you’re going to get. But it will help you a lot to read sample letters and only from reliable sources. For example, I wrote a website called www.goodluckielts.com and there, there are many sample letters, sample letter topics, and you can be sure that the English there is perfect. Unfortunately there are a lot of websites today, and not all of them have perfect English even in their so-called model essays or model letters.

Okay? So make sure whenever you go to a site that it is a site that you can be sure of so that you learn the right things and don’t do any of the wrong things. Okay? So, what do you do now? Well, I suggest these things: Go to our website at www.engvid.com. Why? Because there you can download for free a resource which will contain all 14 of these points-okay?-for you. So in case you didn’t write them down, don’t worry, I’ve written them all down for you clearly. Plus you will get those expressions, those standard expressions that I mentioned you need to use to make your letter writing easier. You also will get sample letter topics so that you get some idea of what is a formal question look like, a semi-formal, an informal. And also sample letters, which I’ve written for you. Okay? So please grab that resource. It’s free and it’s available for you, for anyone who wants to download it.

Okay? And while you’re there also check out our website because we have lots and lots of other resources which can help you, and lots of videos and lessons which can help you do better on your IELTS. And subscribe to my YouTube channel because that will really help you improve your grade in terms of very many aspects that go into making a really good English speaker and English writer. All right? I wish you all the best with your IELTS and with your English. Thanks very much for watching. I know you’re a serious student, and I’m sure you’re going to do well. All the best. Bye..

As found on Youtube

Learn English: Expressions that use body parts!

E, what did I tell you about leaving your socks on the fl…? Hi. James from engVid. Little upset now. E leaves his socks all over the place. He only has one foot, but he seems to leave them everywhere. I’m always on your back? This lesson is about body parts, like the back, and how we use them to show or express our feelings, emotions, or thoughts on a situation. Stick with me, and we’ll take your head out of the clouds and teach you some English. You ready? Let’s go to the board. Notice E is saying: “You’re always on my back!” Well, I’m going to come over here and I’m going to show you the body parts, and then I’ll show you an idiom… Or, sorry, let’s say a phrase or an expression that we use to indicate our thoughts or feelings on something, or about someone.

Right? So, why don’t we start with…? Well, what does it say here? Number one, your head. Okay? Your head. If someone says: “Your head is in the clouds”, you’re a dreamer, which means you don’t really think about real things; work, eating, life. You’re thinking: “One day I’m going to fly off and I’m going to visit a country, and I’m going to…” And someone will say: -“Do you have money?” -“No.” You’re a dreamer. Your head is in the clouds. Right? Get your head out of the clouds. Come back to reality. Come back to the real world. That’s number one: “head in the clouds”. Let’s look at number two: “let your hair down”. This is kind of funny because I really don’t have any hair. Let’s just say I had hair. Okay? And my hair is up, like this. Okay? My hair is up. Okay? If I let my hair down, I’m going to relax. My hair is now relaxed. You like that? Purple. It’s cool. “Let your hair down” means have fun, relax, take it easy. Don’t be so serious. Okay? And that’s our hair there. Just see that? Let it down, relax a bit.

How about number three? “Be all ears”. Well, clearly I have only two and I cannot be covered with ears, but “be all ears” means I am focused, I am incredibly… I’m listening to you right now, incredibly focused. So when someone is all ears, it means I’m listening, you have my attention, I’m not thinking of anything but what you are saying. “Be all ears”, and there are your ears. Okay? How about this one? “Lip service”. Those are little lips. Maybe you can’t see them. So here are mine. Lips. Lip service is funny. “Service” means to do something for someone. But “lip service”, it’s actually… Because I have “insincere”, but that might be a big word for you. But it means I don’t really believe it or I don’t really want to do it. So, when you give lip service you say: “Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah”, but you really aren’t going to do it or you really don’t believe in it. Example: Your mother comes home and said: “Okay, you know what? You put the plate over there and the cup over there.

Could you do me a favour? Could you pick it up and put it away?” And you’re watching or playing video games or soccer, and you’re like: “Yeah, yeah, yeah, I’ll do it. Uh-huh. Uh-huh.” You have no intention or you’re not going to do it. You just say: “Yeah, yeah, yeah” to make your mother happy so she thinks you’re going to do it, but you’re not going to. If your boss or employer gives you lip service, they say: “Sure, we’ll give you more money. Everything will be okay. Just go back to work.” It’s lip service. They’re not going to give you any more money, but they expect you to go back to work. Watch out for lip service. Right? Lips. Let’s look at number five. Chin, this is your chin right here.

If you’ve ever seen Superman, Superman has a chin of steel. Big chin. Okay? Now, when somebody says: “Keep your chin up”, your chin is probably here and you’re: “[Whines]”. You’re upset and they say: “Keep your chin up. Don’t be sad. Be happy. Be strong, like Superman.” That’s your chin right here, right underneath your lips. Chin. Okay? “Be on someone’s back”, that’s what E was saying. Well, if you’ve ever had to carry something really big, I don’t know, like… Hold on a second.

I’m still here. This is on my back. It’s really heavy and it bothers me. You know? It’s a pain. It’s upsetting. When something’s on your back, it’s always… They’re always bothering you. “Oh, you’re always on my back asking about giving you money” or “You’re always on my back asking me to help you. Oh, it’s such a… Get off my back, will you? Leave me alone. Don’t bother me. Upset me.” Okay? So if somebody’s on your back, they’re upsetting you, bothering you. I know, my stickman doesn’t have a back, so just for you: The back is here. Okay? So that’s why I was on E’s back, saying: “Pick up your socks.” It means I probably ask him to pick up his socks every hour or every day. Next, where are we? So that was six. Number seven, chest. This is your chest right here. Okay? If… Where we got? Seven right there. The front. So back is the back, chest is the front. If you get something “off your chest” it means you tell someone how you feel, like you really feel.

Like, so maybe someone said: “Hey, look, I can’t come to your party tomorrow and I’m not going to get you a present for your birthday”, and you’re like… They might say: “Is there something on your chest or something you want to get off your chest?” You go: “Yeah! I want to tell you I’m not happy about that. I was never happy about this situation.” Get it off your chest, it’s like open your heart and tell them the truth. Do you have something you want to get off your chest? Something you want to tell me? All right? Tell someone how you really feel, off your chest. Now, here’s a funny one, arm. This is your arm, that is his arm. I’m left-handed, so I write with this hand if you ever noticed. So this expression is kind of funny because, well, most people are right-handed, they use this hand and it’s very valuable to them because they write with this hand, they hit balls with this hand, or catch with this hand.

They do many things with this hand. So, when somebody says to you: “You have a Mercedes? I’d give my right arm… My right arm, my whole arm for a Mercedes”, it means: This arm is so valuable, I do everything with it, but to have that car I would give my arm for it. Now, I might give my right arm because I’m left-handed, it doesn’t matter to me, but for you it’s very valuable. So if you ever hear of someone said: “I’ll give my right arm to be a professional golf player”, or a golf… Yeah, golf player, whatever. Or tennis player, or a soccer or football player, professional. “I’d give my right arm.” They’re saying that is so important to me I would give this important body part to have that. All right? What would you give your right arm for? To be with Mr. E? [Laughs] Just joking. Back to work. Okay. So, number nine, finger. My finger. And you notice I have finger there.

Well, in this case when we say number nine is: “Put my finger on something”, something is wrong. I’ll give you an example. Your friend is coming out, they’re wearing the skinny jeans, and a big flowery top with a funny hat. And you’re going… They say: “Hey. How do I look?” You’re like: “There’s something I don’t like about this, but I can’t put my finger on it.” It means: “I know I don’t like it, but I don’t know exactly what it is.” Or an example would be music. You hear a song at the club, you’re dancing, you’re having a fun, and all of a sudden a new song comes on: “Dom-dom-dom-dun-nuh-dom-dom”, and you’re like: “Uh, I don’t like that song, but I can’t put my finger on it. I don’t know why I don’t like it, but I don’t like it.” You know? That would be for number nine. When you can’t put your finger on something, it’s: “I know I don’t like something, but I can’t either tell you the exact word why or I don’t have an exact reason to point out and say why I don’t like it.” All right? Now, number 10 is leg.

This thing. One second. Let me try again. Leg. Okay, leg. When you “pull somebody’s leg”, which is like pulling, pull, pull my leg, it means to joke with someone or to tease. So I might say to Mr. E: “Hey, E. You want a pair of pants? Jeans?” Well, I’m pulling his leg because he only has one leg, so what does he need pants for? You’ll go: “Poof, go away, James. Go back to teaching English.” All right? So, when you tease or joke with somebody, like: “I’m only joking with you”, I’m pulling your leg – I’m joking. I’m not serious, I’m just trying to have fun with you. That’s pulling someone’s leg.

That’s leg. Foot. I’m getting too old for this. So your foot goes in here. Okay? This is a shoe. You put your foot in here. All right? There we go. So, when you “put your best foot forward”, that’s your foot there, what it means is you show people your best quality. What is the best about me? So if I’m smart, I’ll show you I’m smart, or I’m flexible. I’m not flexible, but here we go. That’s it. I can’t bend anymore. Or I’m good at telling jokes, or drawing people. I would put my best foot forward and show you what I’m very good at. So you do that when you meet people for the first time. You put your best foot forward. Or when you want a job, so they can see: What is really good about you? Okay? And there’s number 12, and it makes my “blood boil” when I forget to do things. I forgot to do number 12. Blood boil. What does “blood boil” mean? Well, I’m going to help you out here. So, doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo. And remember I said it makes my blood boil? Well, “blood” is inside of you. If I cut and something comes out, that’s called blood.

“Boil”, when you make tea, you put the water on and it starts to boil. It means… So, in this case the blood gets hot or you get angry. It just makes my blood boil when… When people won’t let me sit down on a long journey or trip. Or it makes my blood boil when someone’s in the washroom for a very, very, very long time and I need to go. It makes me angry. All right? It made my blood boil when I forgot to put number 12, because now instead of going one to 12, I’ve got 12 to one, and I’m angry about that because I should know better. Right? So, quick recap: Head, hair, ear, chin, lip, arm, finger, chest, leg, foot, back, and blood boil are body parts which I’ve shown you, and these are all the expressions we use to explain to someone how we feel or what’s going on in our head.

And if you like that, I think it’s time for us to go and do the second part with the quiz. Are you ready? Let’s go. [Snaps] Okay. So, I forgot I want to do common collocations before I go on to your quiz. All right? So let’s look at some common collocations. We talked about, remember the other parts of the chin and the ear, and here are a couple that I may not have mentioned to you, but these words usually go together – collocation.

“Raise an eyebrow”. Now, “raising an eyebrow” is this. Ready? Ready? Here we go. See that? Raising that eyebrow. That one goes high. This is your eyebrow, “to raise” means to move up, so I raise my eyebrow. Sometimes you raise your eyebrow because you’re curious. Hmm, what is that? And sometimes because you’re suspicious. I don’t believe you, hmm. Right? So if someone’s suspicious or curious they’ll raise an eyebrow, or: “That raises an eyebrow.” Okay? Another one is “clear your throat”.

Now, I actually have a little bit of a cold, so I might clear my throat. It’s to clear… Clean it up, empty it so I can speak. But a lot of times when people clear their throat, they’re like: “Ahem”, because they want you to pay attention to them. Example, maybe two people are kissing, and you go: “[Clears throat]”, they go: “Oh, sorry. I didn’t know you were here. We wouldn’t have been kissing if that happened.” Clear your throat, get attention. “Shrug your shoulders”, that’s this. You know? -“Hey. You know where Tommy is?” -“I don’t know. I don’t know.” This is: “I don’t know.” These are your shoulders, shrugging them: “I don’t know.” “Thumbs up”, “thumbs down”. “Thumbs up”, I like it. “Thumbs down”, that sucks. It’s no good. Another word is approve, that is good. Disapprove, I don’t like. Thumbs up, thumbs down. “Give the finger”. Okay, I’m going to give you the finger now. Okay? Now, I know YouTube doesn’t like that type of thing. So, it’s an American thing. So, once again, when you give the finger-okay?-you take one finger, this finger here, and you take it away from the rest of them.

See? And you give someone the finger. It’s rude. Very rude. It’s like the “F you”. Okay? So, giving people the finger means you’re probably upset about something or you disagree, and after you say it you should run. [Laughs] Okay. Joking. “Roll your eyes”. I don’t know if you can see me rolling my eyes. Sometimes someone does something very stupid, and you’re like: “Oh my god.” Of course you won’t roll them that slowly. That actually hurt my eyes. But it means to move your eyes in a way to show people you think something is stupid or you’re very annoyed. “This line up is taking way too long. [Sighs].” Roll your eyes, showing it’s stupid or I am very angry at it. Cool? So these words you’ll hear. Right? Little phrases or collocations, and they come together regularly. Raise an eyebrow. That raised an eyebrow so I cleared my throat. But when they asked me what was wrong, I shrug my shoulders like I don’t know. And one of the guys said: “You wasted my time and gave me a thumbs down.” But you know what? I told him: “Yeah, well, whatever”, and gave him the finger.

And then the other guy said: “I don’t believe that guy.” Rolled his eyes with being annoyed. See? I used all of these together, and you can hear people use them in common interactions. You know, native speakers speak like this. Now it is time for our quiz. Are you ready? I’m going to give you first the phrase or the expression, and then we’ll look at what the meaning is and put it… The answer in the appropriate space or in the correct space. Let’s start with the first one: “blood boil”. Remember we talked about making tea and the water getting hot and boiling, and the blood’s inside? I know your blood is boiling right now because you want the answer.

Right? Well, yeah, that’s to get extremely angry. When your blood is boiling you’re very, very angry. What about the second one? “Give my right arm”. Oh, you’re correct. If you give your right arm or willing to give your right arm, I would do that… And this is my arm, remember, it’s because I really want something really, really badly that I’m going to say: “Take my arm and give it to me, please.” So it’s to give something of great value for something you really want.

C: “raise an eyebrow”. So I can just… Raising an eyebrow. What would that be? That’s right. Remember when you’re suspicious? I don’t believe that. Or curious, what is that? Right? So I’m going to put here “curious” as well because I didn’t put it up there for you, but it’s both. Being suspicious or curious, which would be number one. How about: “let your hair down”? Do you remember when I did that one? I had my hair and then I let it down. That’s right, relax and have fun. Have some fun. Now we’re going to do number E with your “head in the clouds”. Right? “Head in the clouds”. When I was a kid we had a song called: “Dreamer, you stupid, little dreamer. And now you got your head in the clouds, oh no.” Right? Old song. Old, old, old, old, old. Before my time but I remember it. Now how about the last one? I think you’re smart enough to figure out which one it is, but let’s just play anyway.

“Get something off my chest.” Which one is left? Oooo, right? Off your chest. Emotions. How do you feel about it? I like it. I don’t like it. If I want to get something off my chest usually it’s negative. “I need to tell you this, and you need to listen to me.” And that would be: Tell someone your feelings, your honest feelings about something. Get it off your chest.

All right? Good. Now, I think we’ve learned a lot. Right? I quite… Can’t quite put my finger on it, but I think it’s time for us to go. Yeah? That’s one of the ones we learned. Yeah? So once again I’d like to say thank you for watching. Always appreciate you watching. I want you to go to www.engvid.com in order to do the quiz and see how well you do, and take a look at some other videos. Don’t forget to, you know, subscribe, so press that button, touch that screen, whatever you do these days, and thanks a lot. We look forward to seeing you soon..

As found on Youtube

Learn English: The 20-Minute Method

Hi, guys. Do you notice something different about today? Hmm. Where’s the board gone? Today’s lesson is a bit different. It’s just me giving you some advice about learning English. And this video is for you, in particular, if you are a learning English quitter. Who is a learning English quitter? A learning English quitter is somebody who works really, really hard studying: “Learn English, learn English, learn English”, for two days, four days, one day, and then quits. Does nothing, does nothing for weeks. And then the same thing: Works really, really hard: “Learn English, learn English, learn English”, for three days, and then quits. “I’ll do it tomorrow. I’ll do it tomorrow.” And the other thing that a learning English quitter does is feel bad all the time about not learning enough English. “I’m so stupid. I should be learning more English.” But you’re not, are you? You’re watching TV, you’re having a beer. You’re not learning English at all, are you? So, this video is for you if you’re a learning English quitter.

And trust me on this one: It is a life changer, total game changer. What you need to begin, starting today, is what I call the 20-minute English discipline. 20-minute English discipline, and you do this every single day of your life. And what it means is for 20 minutes a day, every single day, you study English in a serious way. Okay? A serious way. An active way. You do it on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday; every day. You do it on your birthday, you do it when your cousin’s getting married. You do it every day, it doesn’t matter. No excuses, you do it. So, when your cousin comes to you and says: “Hey, let’s go and have a beer”, you say: “That’s a great idea. I’m going to come with you in nine minutes when I’ve finished my studies. I’ll be with you in a minute.” So don’t let other people put you off doing your daily…

Daily discipline of study. 20 minutes every day. Plus, this is what happens: When you start doing the 20-minute discipline, you realize: “Oh, 20 minutes isn’t that long. I haven’t… I haven’t finished everything I wanted to finish. I’m going to study some more.” Nun-uh, nun-uh, nun-uh. It’s just 20 minutes every day. When you get to 20 minutes, you stop. It’s not: “I’ll do 25 minutes today.” It’s not: “I’ll do 40 minutes today, and not do anything tomorrow.” It’s not that. It’s 20 minutes every day, and then you stop. That’s all you need to do. The problem when you do 40 minutes one day, one hour another day, nothing the next day is that you lose…

You don’t build up the strength and the habit of making studying and studying English, in particular, part of your everyday life, so that’s why for most people it doesn’t work to do a lot on one day and nothing on the other. Your 20 minutes is something that you can fit into any… Any person watching this video, any person in the world, if you’re serious about learning English, or serious about learning anything, anything in the whole world, you can find 20 minutes from your day to get serious about it and put that time aside.

If you’re… We know if you’re not serious. If you’re… You’re not serious if you say: “Oh, I haven’t got time. I haven’t got time. I’m too busy for 20 minutes every day.” Well, you’re not serious if you don’t make 20 minutes a day for your learning English studies. So what I want to talk about now is how exactly you should be using your 20 minutes, and we’re going to talk about using the engVid website for 20 minutes every day.

You already know there’s so many lessons on the engVid site, lessons on everything. Everything you could possibly want or need to know about learning English is on the engVid site. If you could just take all those videos and put them in your head, that would… That would be awesome, wouldn’t it? That would save you a lot of time. But we can’t do that.

It’s not a way of learning. Most people, I think watching the site, watch the videos, listen, do the quiz at the end. Okay? Lesson done. Now, that’s good, but I can tell you how you can make it a lot more effective with your 20-minute daily discipline, and that means that you have to be active when you’re watching the lesson. So I want you to have a pen in hand, paper, and I want you to be taking notes from the lesson. Now, for me, personally, taking notes, I just find it effective to write things down. Like, even if I know something, I’ll write it down; a new phrase that I heard that I learnt, I’ll write it down; new vocabulary, of course, write it down; if it’s a grammar rule, write it down. So just get your hand active during the lesson. Now, the more active you are, obviously, the more you may need to pause the video, so stop the video, write something down, and of course, carry on.

Another thing that is so, so, so effective when you’re learning a language is to repeat materials; watch more than once. Now, your brain is very lazy, and it’s going to be like: “But I already saw that, I know that. I know that lesson.” If you’re learning a language, you don’t know everything the first time you watch the video. Watching a video two times, four times is where you get to see a big, big, big difference. Now, you don’t have to watch again the same day; you could watch again a few days later or a week later.

But that’s where you really start to pick up the things that you missed before, so I think it’s a really, really good part of your daily discipline to be watching things again. So what it… This is what I advise you to do with the videos: First time just watch and watch without subtitles. Okay? Take notes. Good. Second time, watch with the subtitle, and you can read along and listen at the same time. Another good way. A third time, I want you to just watch the video, and pause. Every now and then there’s a good phrase for you to write down. Write it down, and then after, as an option, you can check: “Did you get the spelling of the phrase right?” as well. The point of this is not to rush through the video, and learn everything really, really quickly. The point is to take your time and be active in lesson. And of course, at the end of the lesson, there’s always a quiz for you to do. So, I want you to begin that now. If you’re an English quitter, a learning English quitter, today is the first day of the rest of your learning English life, and you’re going to do 20 minutes studying every day.

Trust me, it’s going to make a big, big difference. You’re going to learn so much English. It starts today. You can do this. You’ve got the power. What I’d like to do now is invite you to take the quiz on today’s video. And also, because we haven’t done this kind of video before-there’s no board here, is there? -I want you to give us a comment and say: How did you like this video? So, until next time, I’ll see you later. Bye..