Silent Letters | English Pronunciation & Vocabulary | PART 1

{“en”:”Oh my gosh guys! How annoying are silent letters in English words? What are they even doing there?! This video is all about English words with silent letters in them. When do you pronounce those letters and when don’t you pronounce those letters? I’m going to teach you a few simple rules to help you pronounce English words correctly. Don’t forget to turn on the subtitles either. The button is just down there, so you can follow along.

There are a lot of English words that have silent letters in them. And there are lots of silent letters in English! About sixty percent of all English words have a silent letter! No wonder pronunciation is so frustrating, right? And they can be silent these letters, but they’re not always silent! So you have to be careful! You need to know a few basic rules to help with the pronunciation of silent letters in English words. Okay, let’s start at the top with the letter A. Now the letter A can be silent especially in words that end in ‘-ally’. Like these: So, I’m not pronouncing: Cut the A out. Get rid of it! Now there’s a rule to remember with the letter B. It’s always silent when it follows the letter M So, practice them with me. I’m not pronouncing the B, I’m just pronouncing the M consonant sound.

And the letter B is often silent when it before the consonant T, so think of these examples: So, see in all of those examples, my lips are closing and coming together to form the B sound, I’m just pronouncing the T. Now, the letter C can cause a few problems because it’s often silent after the letter S, like in these very common examples – they are quite tricky! So that’s the silent C. So what about the letter D? Yep, it can be silent too! So, I’m not pronouncing the D in ‘sandwich’ I’m just pronouncing the consonant N sound before it. Try it with me one more time. And a D can be very quiet, not quite silent, but very quiet in front of a G, like in these examples: So in these examples the D and the G combined together produce the ‘dg’ consonant sound ‘dg’ Okay, so the letter E can often be silent at the end of a word.

I’m pretty sure you know this one already, like these examples: But that E on the end, although it might be silent, it can affect the pronunciation of the vowel sound before it. Let’s look at these examples: So see how the E at the end, although it’s not pronounced, is affecting the vowel sound before it. It makes it longer. So hid /i/ becomes hide /i:/ But if the E is the final letter in the word but it’s the only vowel sound then it needs to be pronounced, like in these examples E can also be silent at the end of past tense regular verbs, which all end in ED, right? But they’re not always pronounced like it is in ‘wanted’.

So, you can hear the ED sound there ‘-ed’, ‘-ed’. It’s its own syllable. But a lot of the time that E isn’t pronounced Now they could be a little bit tricky, so let’s do it again! Okay, so a G can also be silent too! Think about the word sign, champagne, design, or foreign. All of these examples have a silent G. And the combination GH can also be silent when it comes after a vowel sound Now, the letter H is often silent too, often when it’s following a W, like in the examples And sometimes it’s not pronounced at the start of a word like honest and hour.

And sometimes the H is not pronounced when it follows any of these three letters: C, G or R. Now, most of the time CH is pronounced ‘ch’ but on small occasions or rare occasions it’s not pronounce, the H is silent. Good news! The I is not usually silent, it’s usually pronounced. Except in the word business! Okay, K! Now I know you know this one! A K is not pronounced when it comes before an N. The letter L can be silent too and it’s quite common when you look at this list. But consider this rule to be a bit of a cheat because the letter L is quite difficult to pronounce in all of these words, even for a native speaker! So, this makes it easier! In these words where /l/ is really difficult to pronounce then it’s silent! Ready? Let’s try it. So, we got through quite a bit but we’re only halfway through! So, if you want to keep watching and keep practicing with silent letters in English then click the link in the description box and go to part 2 of this video. Guys, I love making these videos for you and I love hearing from you as well, so if you want to say hi come over to my facebook page at mmmEnglish and say hello, ask question, introduce yourself! I’d love to hear from you there.

Make sure you check out part 2 – the links down there! See you soon!. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Lesson 1 – Speak English Clearly! The Imitation Technique

Hello! Welcome to the very first video training lesson for the imitation technique. Thank you so much for signing up! I know you are going to love this training. Now, imitating something is similar to copying something. Usually, imitating is copying actions or words so this technique is all about copying something that a native speaker is saying, exactly. It teaches you to listen to the sounds and patterns of English and trains you to make those same sounds yourself. You’re training your mouth with your ears. So you’re listening to the sounds and you’re not training your mouth with your eyes by reading and guessing the pronunciation of words, you are training your mouth with your ears.

By practising with this technique, you’ll reduce your accent and pronunciation problems more quickly and become a clearer and more confident English speaker. Now, there are three steps that you’ll need to remember when you’re using the imitation technique. First, you’ll need to listen to me and read the text at the same time. So when I talk on this video you’ll see the words come up at the bottom of the screen. In the text, the important stress has been marked so you’ll be able to hear the stresses in my expression and read them as well. Then, it will be your turn! So you’re going to hear me read each sentence again but there will be a pause after each one and this is where you’ll need to copy exactly what I’ve said. Listen for my pronunciation, the stress, the pause, the intonation and then you’ll need to copy it exactly.

You can do this step as many times as you need to before you move on to step number three. Then the bigger challenge is for you to shadow me, which is to copy everything that I’m saying again but this time you won’t have any text on the screen, you’re just listening to the words that I’m saying. Now it might be a little bit tricky, especially the first time, because you’ll be listening to me and speaking at the same time! So it might take you a few times to get comfortable doing it. And remember that you might not understand everything that’s being said as I’m saying it, but that’s not the point of this training. We’re not testing your understanding of English. We’re testing and practising your pronunciation and speaking skills. So if you don’t understand it, don’t worry! But do it again and again and again until the sounds that you are making sound very similar to the ones that I’m making in the video.

And that’s it! The imitation technique is simple yet so effective. If you practise this technique regularly, soon you’ll sound more natural, more confident and more relaxed when you’re speaking English. Let’s try it! I love to travel to different countries, I love meeting new people and tasting different foods (that’s my favorite part!) To date, I think I’ve visited about twenty-two different countries but there are so many more places on my list. Almost every person that I know, who has a decent income, does some sort of travel every year, usually overseas. to a different country. In my opinion, travelling overseas and to different countries makes us more accepting of each other’s differences and teaches us respect for different cultures, traditions and beliefs.

It also helps me to tell some pretty interesting stories about my adventures. I love talking to people about places they’ve visited and things that they’ve seen in the world,. I think it’s because I can easily relate to them and it’s easy for me to share my stories and experiences with them. Plus, I love getting recommendations about places to visit. It helps me to plan where my next holiday is going to be. Okay, now for step number two.

You’re going to imitate exactly what I say – the pronunciation, the stress, the pause. And there will be a pause after each sentence that will let you do that. Ready? I love to travel to different countries I love meeting new people and tasting different foods (that’s my favorite part!) To date, I think I have visited about twenty-two different countries but there are so many more places on my list. Almost every person that I know, who has a decent income, does some sort of travel every year, usually overseas, to a different country. In my opinion, travelling overseas and to different countries makes us more accepting of each other’s differences and teaches us respect for different cultures, traditions and beliefs. It also helps me to tell some pretty interesting stories about my adventures. I love talking to people about places they’ve visited and things that they have seen in the world.

I think it’s because I can easily relate to them and that’s easy for me to share my stories and experiences with them. Plus, I love getting recommendations about places to visit. It helps me to plan where my next holiday is going to be. This is step three, where you’re going to shadow exactly what I’ve said, as I’m saying it. So you’ll be listening to me and speaking at the same time. Remember, it might take you a couple of goes to get this right but that’s OK! Ready? I love to travel to different countries. I love meeting new people and tasting different foods (that’s my favorite part). To date, I think I’ve visited about twenty-two different countries but there are so many more places on my list.

Almost every person that I know, who has a decent income, does some sort of travel every year, usually overseas to a different country. In my opinion, travelling overseas and to different countries makes us more accepting of each other’s differences and teaches us respect for different cultures, traditions and beliefs. It also helps me to tell some pretty interesting stories about my adventures! I love talking to people about places they’ve visited and things that they’ve seen in the world. I think it’s because I can easily relate to them and it’s easy for me to share my stories and experiences with them. Plus, I love getting recommendations about places to visit. It helps me to plan where my next holiday is going to be. So that’s it! Tomorrow I’m going to send you a new lesson to practise with! If you’re watching this on YouTube and you haven’t signed up on my website yet, you will need to do that to get the next lesson for tomorrow. So you need to write your email address on my website www.mmmenglish.com/signup So, then come and join us! We’ve got four more lessons to get through.

See you tomorrow!.

As found on Youtube