IELTS Writing: Numbers and Pie Charts

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Learn English Tenses: 4 ways to talk about the FUTURE

{“en”:”Hello. My name is Emma, and in today’s lesson, I’m going to teach you the four futures. Okay? A lot of you know two futures, I think. A lot of you probably know “will” and “going to”. I’m going to teach you two more futures today, and teach you how they’re different from one another. Okay? So let’s get started with the present continuous future. So the present continuous is when you have “be” verb, so “I am”, “you are”, “he is”, “she is”, “they are”, I don’t know if I said “we are”, “we are” plus the verb and “ing”. Okay? So we have “am”, the verb, “ing”. This is known as the present continuous. It’s usually one of the first things you will learn when you’re learning English.

So a lot of you know the present continuous, and you think: “Oh, present continuous, it’s taking place now.” You’re right, but we can also use it to talk about the future. We use the present continuous to talk about future that is going to happen very, very soon. So, for example, if you ask me: “Emma, what are you doing this weekend?” Well: “I’m hanging out with my friend, Josh, this weekend.” Okay? Or I might say: “I’m shopping this weekend.”, “I’m studying this weekend.” If you ask me: “What are you doing tonight?” Well, you know, I want to be a good student, so: -“I’m studying tonight. I’m studying tonight.” -“What are you doing next week?” -“Well, next week… I’m working next week.” Okay? So present continuous is very, very common for when we’re talking about the future that’s going to happen soon. Not future that’s going to happen 2,000 years from now or 50 years from now – no, no, that’s far future.

We’re talking about the future that’s going to happen in the next couple of days. Okay? So very, very soon future. We can also use the simple present to talk about the future. So, the simple present is when you take a verb and, you know, it’s in the basic form, usually you add an “s”. If it’s third-person singular, for example: “I leave”, “you leave”, “he leaves”, “she leaves”, “they leave”, “we leave”. So this is all simple present. In your classes, you probably learned we use the simple present when we talk about routine. We can also use the simple present when we’re talking about routines in the future. Okay? So, for example… And by this I mean timetables. We use this when we’re talking about a schedule event; something that is scheduled to happen in the future. So, this usually has to do with when we’re talking about transportation; trains, airplanes, we can use this tense. We can use it when we’re talking about TV shows. We can use it when we’re talking about restaurants opening and closing, or stores, when they open and close.

So we use this when we’re thinking about a schedule or a timetable. So here are some examples: “The last train leaves at 6pm today.” So 6pm hasn’t happened yet. It’s in the future, but because this is a schedule event, it’s a timetable event, it’s a schedule, we can use the simple present. Here’s another example: “The restaurant opens at 5pm today.” So this hasn’t happened yet. Right now, it is 2pm. This is going to happen in the future.

But still, I use the simple present because this is a schedule. Okay? Every day the restaurant opens at 5pm. Here’s a third example, I like watching TV, imagine I like The Big Bang Theory: “My TV show, The Big Bang Theory, starts at 4pm.” So again, it’s a routine, it’s a schedule that takes place in the future, but it’s still a schedule so we can use the simple present here. All right, so these two, even though they’re present tenses, they can be used for the future. Now let’s look at the two verbs we commonly use for the future or we commonly think of as future verbs. “Be going to” + a verb and “will”. So, “be going to” + verb: “I’m going to study.”, “I’m going to sleep.”, “You are going to watch a video.” Okay? These are examples of the “be going to” + verb future. So we use this when we’re talking about the near future. Similar to this… So it’s not a future that’s very, very far away; it’s soon, but it’s a future where we think something is going to happen, and we have evidence that something is going to happen. So, for example: “I’m going to study English next month in Canada.” This means you probably have your ticket already bought, you’re pretty sure about this.

There’s not a lot of confusion. This is almost going to happen almost certainly. So you’re pretty sure about this. “I’m going to study English next month.” Another example, imagine I watch the weather station. Okay? And the meteorologist has predicted the weather, but it’s a very good prediction because we see these clouds in the sky, there’s a lot of evidence it’s going to rain. Because there’s evidence, we could use this tense and we could say: “It’s going to rain all week.” So this is based… It’s in the near future, but it’s based on some sort of evidence. This is likely to happen, and we’re pretty sure it’s going to happen.

We have some evidence that makes us think it’s going to happen. So this is a bit different from “will”, which is one of the maybe easier futures to think about. We use “will” + a verb. For example: “I will always love you.”, “I will study hard.”, “I will do my taxes on time.” Okay? So we use “will” + a verb when we’re talking, first of all, in the far future. So this is all soon. This is very soon; whereas this, is very far. So for example: “In 50 years, everyone will speak Chinese.” We use this also when we’re not so sure about something.

This is my prediction, but I don’t have much evidence of this. I’m not very, very sure, so I will use “will” because I’m not sure; whereas if I’m very sure, there’s a lot of evidence, I know it’s going to happen, I do “be going to”. So this one, there’s not a lot of evidence, and it’s a prediction we don’t have evidence for. Another example: “Aliens will invade Earth.” Okay? In 25 years, aliens are coming, they will invade the Earth. I don’t mean to scare you. Luckily, I’m using “will”, which means I’m not really sure. If I said to you: “This week, aliens are invading the Earth”, you’d be very scared. If I said: “Aliens are going to invade the Earth. I know this. I have secret government documents.” I’d be using this, and you’d be scared, too. But with “will”, it’s “will” so you don’t have to be scared.

It might not happen. We also use “will” when we’re making promises. Okay? So if somebody ever gets down on their knee, and says: -“Emma, will you marry me?” -“I will marry you.” It means I’m promising to marry you. Okay? Or maybe I don’t really like the person, I might say: “I won’t marry you.” “Won’t” is the negative form of “will”. So I promise not to marry you. I don’t know in your culture, but in Canadian culture and many Western cultures, for New Years, we always make these resolutions. We think: “Oh…” When it’s New Years, when it’s January 1st, we make some sort of promise to our self that we’re never going to do something again, or we’re going to start doing something. We normally use “will” for these. So, for example, maybe you have had too many beers, and you’re thinking: “I don’t want to ever drink again”, you might make a promise to yourself: “I won’t drink again. I will never drink again.” Okay? Or maybe you want to stop smoking: “I will never smoke again.

I will never do this again.” Okay? Maybe your parents are angry at you because, you know, you did really bad on a test: “I promise I will work harder, I will study harder.” So these are promises. We use “will” for promise. Finally, we also use “will” for volunteering. Okay? When we want to volunteer for something, we want to offer our help. We want to help someone, we can use “will”. So, for example: -“Emma, can you clean the dishes?” -“I’ll do it.” -“Emma, can you vacuum the floor?” -“Sure. I’ll vacuum.”, “I’ll get the telephone.”, “I’ll help you with your homework.”, “I’ll help you learn English.” I’m volunteering, and so I use “I will”.

Okay? So just to recap, just to quickly go over everything: there are four futures I’m teaching you today. Present continuous can be used as the future if it’s very soon. Simple present can be used for the future if it’s a routine or schedule, something that’s like… If you look at a schedule in the future, we can use the simple present. We can use “be going to” if we’re talking about the near future and some kind of plan that… Or prediction we have evidence for. We are pretty certain it’s going to happen. And then we can use “will” and a verb for the far future for a promise or when we want to volunteer for something. Okay? So, there you have it, four futures. I invite you to come visit our website at www.engvid.com. There, you can actually practice these on our quiz. I hope you will do it soon. I hope, actually… I hope you’re doing it today or tomorrow. Okay? So until next time, take care.

I wish you the best of luck. And good day, sir.. “}

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Neuro Linguistic Programming in Brighton

100 School Words | Learn English Pronunciation | Practice Drill

{“en”:”Hello guys! My name is Fanny. Welcome to this pronunciation drill. Watch this video if you want to improve your pronunciation very quickly. And in today’s video, I have 100 words on school. All the words that you need to know. Now, don’t forget, it’s very important to for you to repeat after me. Let’s get started. Thank you guys. I’m sure you do a great job. If you think the video went too fast, or you want to do it again, Please, do it again! Watch the video over and over. Don’t stop practicing. Practice will make you better. Also you can watch my other pronunciation drills. They will be very helpful if you want to improve your pronunciation skills. See you next time! Thank you guys so much for watching my video. If you’ve liked it, please show me your support. Click ‘like’.

Subscribe to the channel. Put your comments below. And share the video. See you!. “}

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Neuro Linguistic Programming in Brighton

Learn English: The 2 ways to pronounce ‘THE’

{“en”:”Hello. I’m Gill from engVid, and today’s lesson is about the little word “the”, and how to say it, how to pronounce it. You might think: “What? I know how to pronounce that word”, but there are two different ways of pronouncing it, and this lesson is designed to show you how to work out which way to say it. Okay. So, the simple rule is: Before a consonant you say “thuh”, but before a vowel sound you say “thee”. So it’s either “thuh” or “thee”.

So, let me just go through some examples to show you how that works. So, before a consonant sound: “thuh”. “The banana”, “the dog”, but then we get our first exception, which is confusing because this word begins with an E which is a vowel letter, but the way it’s pronounced, it has a “ya” at the beginning: “Ya. European. European”, so we say: “Thuh European”, okay? So that’s a slight confusion to be aware of. Continuing on: “The flowers”, “the house”, “the man”, “the people”.

Another exception again because this word begins with a U, which is a vowel letter, but the actual sound when you say this sound is a “ya”, “university”, “university”. It’s not: “university”, it’s “university”. So: “thUH university”, okay? And finally: “The woman, the woman”. So that’s “the” before a consonant sound. So, let’s have a look at the other column. Before the vowel sound we say “thee”, so: “The apple”, “the elephant”, “the ice cream”, “the orange”, “the umbrella”. You can see here “umbrella” also begins with a U, just like “university”, but it’s not pronounced: “yumbrella”, it’s pronounced: “umbrella”, so: “thee umbrella, the umbrella”. Okay. And finally, here’s another funny one, it begins with an H, so you might think: “Well, that’s a consonant”, but it is actually a vowel sound because we don’t pronounce the H in this word.

You may know the word “heir”, which we had in another lesson about using “a” and “an”. The heir is usually, well, male, and the heiress, female; but often the word “heir” is used for female as well nowadays for reasons of equality. So, but: “the heiress”, “e”, so it’s an “e”, “heiress”, so that’s a vowel sound, so: “the heiress”. Okay? So that’s another one to remember, along with the “ya” sound here. So, it’s purely the way you say it which decides whether it’s “thuh” or “thee”. Okay? So now we’ll move on to a second screen, and we’ll do some sentences for you to work out how to pronounce each time the word “the” or “the” appears, so… Okay, so what I should have said at the end of the last section was the word “heir” and “heiress”, I didn’t explain what they meant. So, if you hadn’t seen the other lesson you wouldn’t… You might not know that, so “an heir” or “an heiress” is someone who inherits something, often money or property, something like that. So, okay. Right, so here is the test for you of how to pronounce the word “t-h-e”: “thuh” or “thee”, and as you can see, we have some sentences here.

And every time the word appears I’ve underlined it in red just to help you to see it. So, first sentence: “The ferry crossed the Irish Sea.” So, how would you pronounce the word there? Okay. So: “thuh” goes before a consonant sound, so “f” is a consonant, so: “Thuh fairy. The fairy crossed”, and what about this one? “I” is a vowel sound, so it’s “thee Irish Sea, the Irish Sea”. So: “The fairy crossed the Irish Sea.” Okay? Next one: “The right way is the only way.” Okay, so how would you pronounce those two? So, “r” is a consonant, so: “Thuh right way. The right way is”, “only”, that begins with an “o”, which is a vowel, “only”.

So: “thee only way. The right way is the only way.” Okay? Next one, we have three examples in this sentence, so: “The answer is at the back of the book.” So, what would you do there? “The answer, the back, the book”, so “answer” begins with “a”, which is a vowel, so it’s: “Thee answer. The answer is at”. “Back” and “book” begin with “b”, which is a consonant, so: “Thuh back of thuh book.” Okay. Next one: “The fire hasn’t reached the upper floor”. “Upper” means at the top of the building, up at the top. Okay, so: “fire” begins with an “f”, so that’s a consonant, so: “thuh fire. The fire hasn’t reached”, “upper” begins with “u” which is a vowel sound, so it’s: “thee upper floor. The fire hasn’t reached the upper floor.” Okay. Right. Next one: “The girl felt at home in the empty house.” So if you feel at home, you feel comfortable, you like your surroundings.

Okay. So: “girl” begins with “g” which is a consonant, so: “thuh girl. The girl felt at home in”, “empty” begins with “e” which is a vowel, so: “thee empty house. The girl felt at home in the empty house.” Okay. Next one: “I will join the union in the morning.” So, “union” is a… To do with your profession, for your employment rights and so on, and you pay a subscription to join. So: “I will join”, “union” begins with a “u” which is a vowel sound, so…

Ah, no, hang on. This is one of those exceptions. “Yunion”, so… I nearly caught myself out there. It’s a “ya” sound, so: “thuh union”. It’s not “thee” onion, because “onion” is a different word altogether, with an “o”, an onion is a vegetable, so this is the union. Okay, so: “I will join thuh union in”, “m” consonant, “thuh morning, the morning”. Okay. So that’s a funny little exception, there. Next one, say you’re in a big department store with lots of floors and they have escalators going up and down, and you can’t decide which department to go to first, so you’re with a friend, you might say: “Shall we take the up escalator or the down escalator?” Okay, so which one would you use? “Thuh” or “thee”? So, before “up”, “up”, letter “u” is a vowel sound, “up”, so it’s: “thee up, the up”.

“Shall we take the up escalator or”, then before “down”, “d” is a consonant, so: “thuh, the down escalator”. Okay? And then finally, here’s another one, a little exception because there’s an “h” here, which is not pronounced. So the word “honour”, “honourable”, it sounds like an “o”, we don’t pronounce the “h”, so: “It’s the honourable thing to do.” Which? Which would you use there? Okay, so: “It’s thee honourable”, this one. “…the honourable thing to do”. Okay, so I’m sure you got those all right, and we also have a quiz for you to test that a little bit further on the website, www.engvid.com, so do go to that and try that, see how many points you can get. And see you again soon. Okay. Bye for now.. “}

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Hypnotherapy in Brighton

Gabriella [ ForB English Teachers ]

{“en”:”Hi everyone. My name is Gabriella and I’m from England in the UK. My hometown is Durham. It’s close to Newcastle. My hobbies are yoga, photography and I love to travel. I love all Japanese food and I have been living in Japan a few years now. I’m really looking forward to teaching you all here at For B English, so please join us.. “}

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Hypnotherapy in Brighton

English Conversation Study in COLORADO – American English

{“en”:”In this American English pronunciation video, youu2019re going to come with me and my parents to Colorado. Youu2019ll get to see some of the natural beauty of this state, and study American English pronunciation in real life. Todayu2019s topics: How to pronounce u2018riveru2019, gorge, the noun and the verb, the idioms u2018to keep your eyes peeledu2019 and u2018keep an eye outu2019. Also, the pronunciation of u2018mooseu2019 and u2018elku2019. >> One neat feature of Colorado is the Colorado river. Now, it might not look like too much here, but this is the river that carved out the Grand Canyon in Arizona. I was lucky enough to visit the Grand Canyon on my Epic Road Trip Across America this summer. >> The word u2018riveru2019 is a two-syllable word with stress on the first syllable. DA-da. River. It begins with an R consonant.

When the R comes at the beginning of a word, the lips to make a tight circle for that, rr, and the tongue is pulled back. For me, the middle part is touching the roof of the mouth about here, rr, the tip isnu2019t touching anything. Then we have the IH vowel, so the jaw will drop just a bit and the tongue will come forward. Riv-. >> Then for the V, the bottom lip will come up and make contact with the bottom of the top front teeth. Riv-er. Then we have the schwa-R ending, so the tongue will come back into position for the R. The jaw doesnu2019t need to drop.

River, river. River. >> Weu2019ve stopped here to take a look at the Byeru2019s Gorge. A gorge is a deep, rocky ravine. And, as you can see, we have these nice, beautiful rock faces going up on either side. And I think itu2019s just beautiful. In this case, the Colorado river is whatu2019s flowing down, uh, in the middle. I suppose it is what has worn the edges of the mountains down. >> Gorge is sort of a tricky word. It starts with the G consonant, then it has the AW as in LAW, but the tongue must pull straight back for the R consonant, gor-, gor-, -ge.

And it ends with the J as in JAR consonant sound. Gorge. Itu2019s gorgeous! >> Well gorge also has the meaning of eating too much food, when you gorge out. >> Thatu2019s true. >> On a bunch of food. >> Thatu2019s true. So this is the noun gorge, and the verb gorge: stuffing your face, basically. >> Thatu2019s right. >> Yeah. >> And itu2019s sort of funny in that, in the one, gorge is hollowing out, cutting away >> Right.

>> u2026this big ravine >> Yeah. >> u2026 in the mountains, and on the other, gorge is filling up. >> Right. Stuffing! >> Way too much. >> Thatu2019s interesting. So, gorge the noun is a narrow valley, like you saw, typically with rock walls and a river or stream running through it. The verb has a completely different meaning, to eat a lot of food, to stuff yourself. The word comes from a word meaning throat. Next we drove to Rocky Mountain national park to see elk and moose. >> Okay, so keep your eyes peeled for both elk and moose. Keep your eyes peeled means to watch for something. We use it with u2018foru2019, which you know we like to reduce. Keep your eyes peeled for moose and elk. >> So keep your eyes peeled for both elk and moose. >> Dad, whatu2019s the other idiom we came up with for this? >> Uh, keep an eye out for elk and moose.

>> Yes. As we drive, weu2019ll keep an eye out for moose and elk. >> Keep an eye out for elk and moose. >> Yes. Keep an eye out is not the same thing as keep an eye on. >> No. Thatu2019s correct. >> If we had some elk here, we could keep an eye on them. But since we donu2019t have any and weu2019re looking for them, weu2019re keeping an eye out for them. Keep an eye on means to watch or pay attention to something. For example, keep an eye on the time so youu2019re not late. >> Elk has the EH as in BED vowel. A lot of jaw drop. Then the Dark L, so the back part of your tongue has to pull back, el-k. Then the K. So lift your tongue to the soft palate, and release. Elk. >> Itu2019s fun being able to get so close. Thereu2019s two here, which brings me to the point that the plural of elk is elk.

You donu2019t add an S or anything. One elk, two elk. We got lots of good views of elk. But I really wanted to see a moose. I only saw them at a distance, sitting down. We had been looking the whole day, and I was starting to think I wouldnu2019t see one. Then, just before it was dark outu2026 >> I feel very luck to be seeing my first moose. Moose is an easy pronunciation. Itu2019s the M consonant sound, the OO as in BOO vowel, and the S consonant sound. Plural, just like u2018elku2019, adds no s. Itu2019s still just moose. One moose, a herd of moose. Isnu2019t it beautiful? This is a female, so it doesnu2019t have the antlers. I hope you enjoyed this study of real life American English in the beautiful Rocky Mountain National Park.

Thatu2019s it, and thanks so much for using Rachelu2019s English.. “}

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Hypnotherapy in Brighton

Intonation in Long Sentences – English Pronunciation with JenniferESL

{“en”:”In this lesson, we’ll focus on intonation patterns within longer sentences. Like the one I just said about boots. [title] My model sentences are getting longer now, so I’m using thought groups or intonation groups. Remember what those are? Sometimes our sentences begin with a longer thought. It could be a phrase or a whole clause (with a subject and a verb). We can use low-rise intonation to signal that we’re not done yet.

There’s more information that we’d like to add. There’s more than one intonation pattern we can use in longer sentences. – Either in that first thought group or a middle thought group. So I’ll share a second. It involves dropping our voice and then rising again. Some call it a fall-rise intonation pattern. We can use this fall-rise in many of the same places as the low-rise. You try. Let’s practice the fall-rise intonation pattern. Repeat after me. So what’s the difference between the low-rise and and the fall-rise? I don’t believe there’s a significant difference. Both patterns end with a rise, and that signals incompletion. You’re not done with your thought.

There’s more coming. Here’s where I think there could be a difference. Stating lists. Listen and compare. I have one pair of sneakers, a few pairs of boots, two pairs of sandals, and…several pairs of dress shoes. I have one pair of sneakers, a few pairs of boots, two pairs of sandals, and several pairs of dress shoes. When I used low-rise intonation the first time, I needed time to think. My statement sounded more hesitant, less certain. The second time I used fall-rise intonation. It sounded more certain. Perhaps even more authoritative. See if you can understand the difference when I count. First, I’ll use a low-rise.

1…2…3…4…5. Now I’ll try a fall-rise. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. Sounds more certain. I can make it even more certain and perhaps authoritative if I use that “angry parent” voice. 1, 2, 3, 4… Do you see how the meaning…and the expression changes? We can even put these two intonation patterns together in the same sentence. I did this at the beginning of the video when I said, …and then I add on. We might also use a fall-rise when we need to pause because we’re hesitating to add on. To finish our thought. We know what we’re going to say, but perhaps what we’re going to say is surprising or disappointing in some way. You’ll hear statements like, You could try, but it may not work. They’re good, but expensive. Let’s put everything together. We’ll read a short text. I’ll mark the thought groups, show the focus words, and also show where we rise and fall. If you want, I’ll tell you where I got these leather boots. Do you want to know? I got them in Texas. That’s all for now. Thanks for watching and happy studies.. “}

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Hypnotherapy in Brighton

8 Tips for British English Pronunciation

{“en”:”Hi, everyone. I’m Jade. What we’re talking about today is some pronunciation tips for British English. Some of them are tips; some of them are observations that you might be interested to know. We’ve got eight of them, so let’s get started. Pronunciation of-ed word endings. This is not specifically a British English issue. If your preference — I don’t know why I can’t speak suddenly in an English pronunciation video, but that’s how it is. If your preference is American English, this also applies to American English. So what I hear a lot at, sort of, around intermediate level — sometimes upper intermediate level if you haven’t had someone to correct you — -ed word endings sound like this.

I can’t even do it because it’s so unnatural for me. “Excite-ed shout-ed, remind-ed.” It’s so unnatural for me. But in fact, it’s not like that. It doesn’t sound like an -ed. It might sound like an /id/; it might sound like a /t/; or it might sound like a /d/. So I’ve got some examples here. This word, even though it’s spelled -ed, makes an /id/ sound. It becomes “excited”. “I’m really excited.” “Shouted.” “He shouted at me.” “Reminded.” “I reminded you to do your homework; didn’t I?” And — yeah.

So now, we can talk about the ones that finish with a t sound. “Finished. Dripped. Laughed.” They don’t have the-ed sound. So that’s an important thing to know about pronunciation. Even if it’s spelled-ed, it doesn’t mean it sounds like that. And what about the ones that end with a d sound, a “duh” sound. “Remembered.” “I remembered what you said to me.” “Called.” “I called you. Didn’t you hear your phone?” “Imagined.” “I imagined a better future for everyone.” So with those, it’s a D sound. How do you know for each one? Go with what feels most natural when you’re saying the word.

The main thing is don’t force the -ed sound at the end of the word because it’s that that gives you an unnatural rhythm when you’re speaking English. So moving on to — this one’s an observation, really. British English pronunciation. We have so many different accents in England. But one of the biggest divisions in our accents is — it’s between the north of the country and the south, and it’s our pronunciation of these words: “bath” and “laugh”, as I say them. I say them in the southern pronunciation. But if I were from the north — if I were from the north of the country, I’d say “bath” and “laugh” because they have a different accent up there. Well, they’ve got loads of different accents, but they don’t speak in the same way as me. So let’s break it down into the actual sound. So if you’re from the North, you say, “a”. But we, in the South, say “au”. So you say “bath”, we say “bauth”. And you say “laf”; we say “laugh”. And you can also hear it in these two words. It doesn’t have to be the first or only a vowel in the word.

In the southern pronunciation, this is “commaund”. But in the northern pronunciation, it’s “command”. And the southern pronunciation of this word is “caust”. The northern pronunciation is “cast”. The cast of Brookside came to London.” “Brookside” was an old soap that’s not on TV anymore, and it was people from Liverpool. And I was just doing the accent. Probably that’s really irrelevant to you.

You will never see that show, but anyway. You know, now. Next tip. I don’t hear this that often, but when I do, it sounds really, really, really wrong. And I think this tip generally — generally a good example of how — just because we write something one way doesn’t mean we say it that way. So in English — American English, too — W sounding words are the same as the “wh” sound in words for spelling. It actually sounds the same. So we’ve got two words here, “wine” and “whine”.

One is spelled with WH, and one is just spelled with I. “Whine” is a kind of moan or a kind of cry. Sometimes, young children whine. Sometimes, women who are upset about something are said to be “whiny”. So we don’t really say that men whine. That’s probably a bit sexist. But, yeah. The point is they sound the same but are spelled differently. So I’ve sometimes heard people try to make the “wh” sound like “hwhine” or something like that or in these words, “which” and “witch” are the same. Some people might say “hwhich”. And that used to be a feature of British English. If you listen to some speakers of British English from a long time ago, like around the 1920s — T.

S. Eliot, although he wasn’t British, he did acquire a really strange British accent. And when he spoke English, he would make the “hwhich” sound. And that was a standard feature of the accent then. But if you say it now, it just sounds a bit weird. So don’t be making the “hwh” sound. And here, two commonly spoken words with that “hwh” sound that you shouldn’t say — so you should say “what” without “hwhat, hwhat, hwhat do you want?” That would be awful.

And “hwhere” — don’t say that. Just say it without the H sound. Let’s take a look at the pronunciation of -ing word endings. So in just relaxed, informal speech, I feel that a lot of dialects don’t pronounce the G. So it would be like this. “I was listening to some music.” You don’t hear the G there. But if we’re making an effort to speak properly and with very good enunciation, you would hear the G slightly. It would sound like this, “I was listening to a wonderful lecture yesterday.” And you hear my G. It’s very soft, but it’s there. Something to say about British English pronunciation is — again, this is a north-south difference — is that they, up there, some of the accents ring the G, so it’s, like, “listening, speaking.

I was speaking to him.” And if that’s a feature of your accent, that’s a feature of your accent. But in standard English, you don’t ring it. You don’t make an extra “guh” or “juh” sound at the end. So the standard way to make the G sound, “reading.” But I’m just letting you know that in relaxed and informal speech, many times, we don’t hear the G. So when we come back we’ll look at the other four rules or tips — tips, really. Tips and observations about pronunciation. Tip No. 5, when we’re saying a word with two or more syllables, very often, the second syllable is not stressed, and it’s what we call a “schwa”. So even though all these words have a different spelling for the second syllable, they become a schwa.

So what some people do is they’ll say the word. And a good example is this word. They will say “En-gland”. But actually, it sounds like this “England”. So the vowel changes to a schwa, and then, it’s — another way to look at it is it becomes a softer sound. So let’s say some of the words. “London”, not “Lon-don”. “London, England, together”, not “togeth-er”. “Together”. “Button”, not “butt-on”. “Button”. “Cousin”. So that’s the schwa, and supposedly the most common sound in the English language, and it’s a pretty confusing sound as well because it’s always spelled in different ways, and it doesn’t actually sound exactly the same when it moves around into different words. So not an easy one to get familiar with. So the main thing to take away from it is that don’t put that very big stress on all your syllables in the word. It won’t sound right.

No. 6, tip No. 6, British English is a non-rhotic accent. This is the sound /r/. In your language, maybe you do that thing where you roll your tongue which I can’t do. I just — I so can’t do it. So like how I can’t do that sound, you might find it really hard to make that sound without rolling your tongue. Okay. It’s hard. Pronunciation is not easy. But you can always work at something and train yourself. So when we make the R sound, the position of the tongue is quite far back in the throat. R, R, R. And it doesn’t have that rhotic sound. And in some dialects, for example, in Scottish, you do hear it. So I’m going to say this sentence in a Scottish accent, “The murderer wore red.” Sorry, Scottish people. But they put the R sound in. I kind of did it then. Maybe I can do it after all. But in my accent, I would say, “the murderer wore red.” So we don’t roll our tongues. And that’s something — if you want to speak standard British English, you could work on that R if you do it.

So if you’re Arabic or if you’re Spanish, Italian as well, you could work on that sound. No. 7, now. So this is a hard sound. I’m going to have to be honest with you. It’s a hard sound for me because I’m a Londoner, and I’m from South London, and we’re not very — we don’t like this sound very much. We like to replace it with an F sound. I’m not too bad making this sound at the beginning of a word, “three”, “thought”, “think”. But sometimes, it’s quite hard for me, like in this word. I want to say “birfday” with an F, but it should be “birthday”. It’s really hard for me. But it’s not just hard for me; it’s hard for people all over the world.

Maybe we should just get rid of this sound. We don’t need it anymore. Some people replace it with D. I’ve got an Italian student who replaces it with D. So he would say “dirty dree”. That’s not an Italian restaurant, but — restaurant? Italian restaurant? Why am I thinking about food? It’s not an Italian accent. Because he can’t say “th”, he replaces it with /d/. But other people might replace it with /v/ as well. So a tip for making the “th” sound, you put your tongue between your teeth. And it’s a kind of whisly sound without the /f/. Your lip is more pursed at the top. So you don’t want to do that when you’re making the “th”. Just try it. I’ll say the words for you. “Three”, “thumbs” — thumbs up if you can make that sound — “birthday”, “thought”, “think”, “bath”. It’s hard for me. I’m trying. I’m trying with you.

We’re learning together today. And rule No. 8, “can’t”. Oh, that’s meant to have that there. A lot of people get confused because sometimes they think, “Did you say a negative there, or did you say the positive?” They get really confused. In British English, we don’t always say the T. We don’t always pronounce the T in this word “can’t”. So it might sound like this, “I can’t understand you.” But it might also sound like this, “I can understand you.” And when I said it the second way, you didn’t hear the T. And the reason that happens is speech just become as little bit more fluid, a little bit more easy to say without the T.

But you don’t need to be confused because, actually, the opposite of “can’t” is “can”. And /caen/ is a different vowel. It’s /ae/, whereas this vowel is /a/. So they would sound completely different. It would be, “I can’t understand you.” Very different to “I can’t understand you” or “I can understand you.” So when you’re listening out for that negative sometimes, know that we might say it with or without a T.

So thank you everybody for watching today. You can do a little bit of extra practice on the EngVid site for this lesson. And if you do like my lesson, please do subscribe because I make lots of different lessons, not just about pronunciation but all other things about learning English as well that I think will be very education and very useful for you in your general development as a learner of English or someone who’s just trying to improve your English. And I’m finished now, so I’m going to go. I’m going to go now, okay? I’ll see you later.. “}

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Neuro Linguistic Programming in Brighton

‘Shut Up!’ Conversation: Learn English Conversation With Simple English Videos

{“en”:”Whatu2019s orange and sounds like parrot? Carrot. A carrot rhymes with parrot. Ha! Come on. Jay, weu2019re trying to work. Whatu2019s red and smells like blue paint? Red paint. Get it? Red paint. Ha! Jay, Iu2019ve got one for you. Yeah? Whatu2019s loud and sounds like shut up? I donu2019t know, what? Shut up.. “}

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Study English in Brighton

Speak English – Learn English Conversation! #9: Learn American English – Speak American English

{“en”:”Hello. Welcome. “Speak American English with Lyman Holton” My name is Lyman Holton. In this lesson you and me are going to have a conversation… as two people discussing directions to the library. Are you ready? Let’s begin. Repeat everything I say for Lyman and Kelly. Excuse me. Where’s the nearest library? Oh, my. I’m afraid the closest one is a couple miles from here. So, there is a library about two miles away? Yes. Are you going to drive there? Yes. Why do you ask? Because the bus, that will be here shortly, goes there. I see. Could you give me directions for driving? Sure. Ah, what is your name, if you don’t mind me asking? Oh, of course not. I’m sorry, I didn’t mean to be rude. That’s all right. I just like to know who I’m talking to.

My name is Kelly. And, may ask what yours is as well? I’m Lyman. Now, to get to the library, drive that way to the fifth stoplight. Okay. I go to the fifth stoplight. Then what? Turn left and go about one mile, and you’ll see the library on the right. All right. Do you know the name of the street where I turn left? I’m not sure. I think it’s 2nd Avenue. Okay. Thanks for the information, Lyman. No problem, Kelly. I hope you don’t have any trouble finding it. Oh, I’m sure I’ll find it okay. Oh, yeah. I just remembered. The library is next to a shopping center.

Now, we’ve had our practice reading everything for both conversations. Now, what we’re going to do is begin our 1st conversation. Speak out loud as Kelly. You are Kelly. Just listen when Lyman speaks. I’m Lyman. Excuse me. Where’s the nearest library? Oh, my. I’m afraid the closest one is a couple miles from here. So, there is a library about two miles away? Yes. Are you going to drive there? Yes. Why do you ask? Because the bus, that will be here shortly, goes there. I see. Could you give me directions for driving? Sure. Ah, what is your name, if you don’t mind me asking? Oh, of course not. I’m sorry, I didn’t mean to be rude. That’s all right. I just like to know who I’m talking to. My name is Kelly. And, may I ask what yours is as well? I’m Lyman. Now, to get to the library, drive that way to the fifth stoplight.

Okay. I go to the fifth stoplight. Then what? Turn left and go about one mile, and you’ll see the library on the right. All right. Do you know the name of the street where I turn left? I’m not sure. I think it’s 2nd Avenue. Okay. Thanks for the information, Lyman. No problem, Kelly. I hope you don’t have any trouble finding it. Oh, I’m sure I’ll find it okay. Oh, yeah. I just remembered. The library is next to a shopping center. Let’s begin our second conversation. Let’s switch dialogues. I am still Lyman. You are still Kelly. Excuse me. Where’s the nearest library? Oh, my. I’m afraid the closest one is a couple miles from here. So, there is a library about two miles away? Yes. Are you going to drive there? Yes.

Why do you ask? Because the bus, that will be here shortly, goes there. I see. Could you give me directions for driving? Sure. Ah, what is your name, if you don’t mind me asking? Oh, of course not. I’m sorry, I didn’t mean to be rude. That’s all right. I just like to know who I’m talking to. My name is Lyman. And, may I ask what yours is as well? I’m Kelly. Now, to get to the library, drive that way to the fifth stoplight. Okay. I go to the fifth stoplight. Then what? Turn left and go about one mile, and you’ll see the library on the right. All right. Do you know the name of the street where I turn left? I’m not sure. I think it’s 2nd Avenue. Okay. Thanks for the information, Kelly. No problem, Lyman. I hope you don’t have any trouble finding it.

Oh, I’m sure I’ll find it okay. Oh, yeah. I just remembered. The library is next to a shopping center. And, that concludes our conversation for this lesson. I hope you enjoyed it… and if you have any questions please feel free to post them below. Goodbye for now.. “}

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Study English in Brighton