Learn English: The 2 ways to pronounce ‘THE’

{“en”:”Hello. I’m Gill from engVid, and today’s lesson is about the little word “the”, and how to say it, how to pronounce it. You might think: “What? I know how to pronounce that word”, but there are two different ways of pronouncing it, and this lesson is designed to show you how to work out which way to say it. Okay. So, the simple rule is: Before a consonant you say “thuh”, but before a vowel sound you say “thee”. So it’s either “thuh” or “thee”.

So, let me just go through some examples to show you how that works. So, before a consonant sound: “thuh”. “The banana”, “the dog”, but then we get our first exception, which is confusing because this word begins with an E which is a vowel letter, but the way it’s pronounced, it has a “ya” at the beginning: “Ya. European. European”, so we say: “Thuh European”, okay? So that’s a slight confusion to be aware of. Continuing on: “The flowers”, “the house”, “the man”, “the people”.

Another exception again because this word begins with a U, which is a vowel letter, but the actual sound when you say this sound is a “ya”, “university”, “university”. It’s not: “university”, it’s “university”. So: “thUH university”, okay? And finally: “The woman, the woman”. So that’s “the” before a consonant sound. So, let’s have a look at the other column. Before the vowel sound we say “thee”, so: “The apple”, “the elephant”, “the ice cream”, “the orange”, “the umbrella”. You can see here “umbrella” also begins with a U, just like “university”, but it’s not pronounced: “yumbrella”, it’s pronounced: “umbrella”, so: “thee umbrella, the umbrella”. Okay. And finally, here’s another funny one, it begins with an H, so you might think: “Well, that’s a consonant”, but it is actually a vowel sound because we don’t pronounce the H in this word.

You may know the word “heir”, which we had in another lesson about using “a” and “an”. The heir is usually, well, male, and the heiress, female; but often the word “heir” is used for female as well nowadays for reasons of equality. So, but: “the heiress”, “e”, so it’s an “e”, “heiress”, so that’s a vowel sound, so: “the heiress”. Okay? So that’s another one to remember, along with the “ya” sound here. So, it’s purely the way you say it which decides whether it’s “thuh” or “thee”. Okay? So now we’ll move on to a second screen, and we’ll do some sentences for you to work out how to pronounce each time the word “the” or “the” appears, so… Okay, so what I should have said at the end of the last section was the word “heir” and “heiress”, I didn’t explain what they meant. So, if you hadn’t seen the other lesson you wouldn’t… You might not know that, so “an heir” or “an heiress” is someone who inherits something, often money or property, something like that. So, okay. Right, so here is the test for you of how to pronounce the word “t-h-e”: “thuh” or “thee”, and as you can see, we have some sentences here.

And every time the word appears I’ve underlined it in red just to help you to see it. So, first sentence: “The ferry crossed the Irish Sea.” So, how would you pronounce the word there? Okay. So: “thuh” goes before a consonant sound, so “f” is a consonant, so: “Thuh fairy. The fairy crossed”, and what about this one? “I” is a vowel sound, so it’s “thee Irish Sea, the Irish Sea”. So: “The fairy crossed the Irish Sea.” Okay? Next one: “The right way is the only way.” Okay, so how would you pronounce those two? So, “r” is a consonant, so: “Thuh right way. The right way is”, “only”, that begins with an “o”, which is a vowel, “only”.

So: “thee only way. The right way is the only way.” Okay? Next one, we have three examples in this sentence, so: “The answer is at the back of the book.” So, what would you do there? “The answer, the back, the book”, so “answer” begins with “a”, which is a vowel, so it’s: “Thee answer. The answer is at”. “Back” and “book” begin with “b”, which is a consonant, so: “Thuh back of thuh book.” Okay. Next one: “The fire hasn’t reached the upper floor”. “Upper” means at the top of the building, up at the top. Okay, so: “fire” begins with an “f”, so that’s a consonant, so: “thuh fire. The fire hasn’t reached”, “upper” begins with “u” which is a vowel sound, so it’s: “thee upper floor. The fire hasn’t reached the upper floor.” Okay. Right. Next one: “The girl felt at home in the empty house.” So if you feel at home, you feel comfortable, you like your surroundings.

Okay. So: “girl” begins with “g” which is a consonant, so: “thuh girl. The girl felt at home in”, “empty” begins with “e” which is a vowel, so: “thee empty house. The girl felt at home in the empty house.” Okay. Next one: “I will join the union in the morning.” So, “union” is a… To do with your profession, for your employment rights and so on, and you pay a subscription to join. So: “I will join”, “union” begins with a “u” which is a vowel sound, so…

Ah, no, hang on. This is one of those exceptions. “Yunion”, so… I nearly caught myself out there. It’s a “ya” sound, so: “thuh union”. It’s not “thee” onion, because “onion” is a different word altogether, with an “o”, an onion is a vegetable, so this is the union. Okay, so: “I will join thuh union in”, “m” consonant, “thuh morning, the morning”. Okay. So that’s a funny little exception, there. Next one, say you’re in a big department store with lots of floors and they have escalators going up and down, and you can’t decide which department to go to first, so you’re with a friend, you might say: “Shall we take the up escalator or the down escalator?” Okay, so which one would you use? “Thuh” or “thee”? So, before “up”, “up”, letter “u” is a vowel sound, “up”, so it’s: “thee up, the up”.

“Shall we take the up escalator or”, then before “down”, “d” is a consonant, so: “thuh, the down escalator”. Okay? And then finally, here’s another one, a little exception because there’s an “h” here, which is not pronounced. So the word “honour”, “honourable”, it sounds like an “o”, we don’t pronounce the “h”, so: “It’s the honourable thing to do.” Which? Which would you use there? Okay, so: “It’s thee honourable”, this one. “…the honourable thing to do”. Okay, so I’m sure you got those all right, and we also have a quiz for you to test that a little bit further on the website, www.engvid.com, so do go to that and try that, see how many points you can get. And see you again soon. Okay. Bye for now.. “}

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Hypnotherapy in Brighton

Silent Letters | English Pronunciation & Vocabulary | PART 1

{“en”:”Oh my gosh guys! How annoying are silent letters in English words? What are they even doing there?! This video is all about English words with silent letters in them. When do you pronounce those letters and when don’t you pronounce those letters? I’m going to teach you a few simple rules to help you pronounce English words correctly. Don’t forget to turn on the subtitles either. The button is just down there, so you can follow along.

There are a lot of English words that have silent letters in them. And there are lots of silent letters in English! About sixty percent of all English words have a silent letter! No wonder pronunciation is so frustrating, right? And they can be silent these letters, but they’re not always silent! So you have to be careful! You need to know a few basic rules to help with the pronunciation of silent letters in English words. Okay, let’s start at the top with the letter A. Now the letter A can be silent especially in words that end in ‘-ally’. Like these: So, I’m not pronouncing: Cut the A out. Get rid of it! Now there’s a rule to remember with the letter B. It’s always silent when it follows the letter M So, practice them with me. I’m not pronouncing the B, I’m just pronouncing the M consonant sound.

And the letter B is often silent when it before the consonant T, so think of these examples: So, see in all of those examples, my lips are closing and coming together to form the B sound, I’m just pronouncing the T. Now, the letter C can cause a few problems because it’s often silent after the letter S, like in these very common examples – they are quite tricky! So that’s the silent C. So what about the letter D? Yep, it can be silent too! So, I’m not pronouncing the D in ‘sandwich’ I’m just pronouncing the consonant N sound before it. Try it with me one more time. And a D can be very quiet, not quite silent, but very quiet in front of a G, like in these examples: So in these examples the D and the G combined together produce the ‘dg’ consonant sound ‘dg’ Okay, so the letter E can often be silent at the end of a word.

I’m pretty sure you know this one already, like these examples: But that E on the end, although it might be silent, it can affect the pronunciation of the vowel sound before it. Let’s look at these examples: So see how the E at the end, although it’s not pronounced, is affecting the vowel sound before it. It makes it longer. So hid /i/ becomes hide /i:/ But if the E is the final letter in the word but it’s the only vowel sound then it needs to be pronounced, like in these examples E can also be silent at the end of past tense regular verbs, which all end in ED, right? But they’re not always pronounced like it is in ‘wanted’.

So, you can hear the ED sound there ‘-ed’, ‘-ed’. It’s its own syllable. But a lot of the time that E isn’t pronounced Now they could be a little bit tricky, so let’s do it again! Okay, so a G can also be silent too! Think about the word sign, champagne, design, or foreign. All of these examples have a silent G. And the combination GH can also be silent when it comes after a vowel sound Now, the letter H is often silent too, often when it’s following a W, like in the examples And sometimes it’s not pronounced at the start of a word like honest and hour.

And sometimes the H is not pronounced when it follows any of these three letters: C, G or R. Now, most of the time CH is pronounced ‘ch’ but on small occasions or rare occasions it’s not pronounce, the H is silent. Good news! The I is not usually silent, it’s usually pronounced. Except in the word business! Okay, K! Now I know you know this one! A K is not pronounced when it comes before an N. The letter L can be silent too and it’s quite common when you look at this list. But consider this rule to be a bit of a cheat because the letter L is quite difficult to pronounce in all of these words, even for a native speaker! So, this makes it easier! In these words where /l/ is really difficult to pronounce then it’s silent! Ready? Let’s try it. So, we got through quite a bit but we’re only halfway through! So, if you want to keep watching and keep practicing with silent letters in English then click the link in the description box and go to part 2 of this video. Guys, I love making these videos for you and I love hearing from you as well, so if you want to say hi come over to my facebook page at mmmEnglish and say hello, ask question, introduce yourself! I’d love to hear from you there.

Make sure you check out part 2 – the links down there! See you soon!. “}

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Study English in London

1 Simple Tip To Sound Australian: /ɑ/ | Aussie Accent | Learn Australian English

{“en”:”G’day guys. Welcome to this episode of Aussie English. Today I want to talk to you about 1 simple trick to sound more like an Aussie when you speak English. Let’s go. So, this one simple trick is words that end with -er, -or, -ar, -ure, -our, and -a (and -re*), all have the same pronunciation in Australian English, at least the majority of the time. And this is the short /u0251/ sound. So, we make this sound by just lowering our jaw, quite a way, and literally just saying the sound /u0251:/, but short, /u0251/. So, as opposed to words like “bar” and “car”, which have the long u0251 sound, this sound is a very short sound. /u0251/. So, let’s go through a couple of words for each one of these endings so you can practice sounding more like an Aussie. And I will admit there are exceptions. Like everything in English, the rule is that there is always an exception.

But, the majority of the time these words are going to end with the sound /u0251/. So it’s a good place to start. So, words that end with -a. Area Cobra Coma Flora Words that end with -ar. Polar Cheddar Linear Jaguar Words that end with -er. Water Laser Maker Beer Words that end with -re. Centre Theatre Tyre Fire Words that end with -or. Mirror Actor Alligator Doctor Words that end with -ure. Treasure Cure Nature Structure Words that end with -our. Favour Neighbour Humour Hour And then, as a little bonus here at the end, guys, sometimes words with -ur at the end are pronounced as /u0251/ as well. Although, a lot of the time they’re going to sound like /u025c/. And one example I could think of was “amateur”. So, that’s it for this episode guys. I really recommend trying to make these pronunciation changes IF you want to sound like an Australian. Otherwise, you’re going to have somewhat of an American accent if you’re pronouncing that /r/ sound at the ends of words like “water”, “anchor”, “treasure”, “neighbour”.

That is a very American sound with that /r/ sound. In Australian English we don’t curl the tongue up to make the /r/ sound. We drop the jaw and we keep our tongue flat. /u0251/ “Neighbour”, “treasure”, “hour”, “actor”. Anyway, good luck guys. Keep at it. Keep improving your Aussie English, and I’ll chat to you soon. Peace out. All the best!. “}

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Study English in London

10 English Words You’re (probably) Mispronouncing! | Difficult Pronunciation | Common Mistakes

Hello! I’m Emma from mmmEnglish and in this lesson, I’m going to share with you 10 English words that you’re probably mispronouncing! If you are learning to speak English, then pronunciation is probably one of the biggest frustrations that you have right now and these words that I’ve chosen are difficult because of the combination of letters or sounds in English. Together they can be quite difficult or your eyes can, in fact, play tricks on you because the letters that you see, they don’t sound like you think they should and some of these words are even difficult for native English speakers to pronounce! But don’t worry about it, don’t sweat, we are going to fix these pronunciation problems right here, right now in this lesson! Let’s get started! OK the first word is ‘vegetable’ ‘vegetable’. Now this word is a challenge because it looks like there should be four syllables in this word. ‘Vegetable’. But there’s not, there are three syllables, ‘vegetable’.

Can you see the syllable – that we completely forget the ‘e’? ‘Vegetable’. We don’t pronounce that second syllable. ‘Vegetable’, ‘vegetable’. Fantastic! I’m going to the market to get some vegetables for dinner. ‘Comfortable’. Now this word, just like ‘vegetable’, has an extra vowel in there that we don’t need to pronounce. ‘Comfortable’, not ‘comfortable’ or ‘comfortable’ but ‘comfort- -able’. ‘Comfortable’. You skip that vowel sound. ‘Comfortable’. You look very comfortable this afternoon. ‘Almond’. Now in this word the ‘L’ is silent. It’s not ‘almond’ or ‘almond’ it’s ‘al- -mond’, ‘almond’, ‘almond’, ‘almond’. I’m going to make an almond cake for dessert. Now there are lots of other English words that have a silent letter ‘L’ in them – words like ‘salmon’, not ‘salmon’, ‘half’, not ‘half’, ‘would’, ‘talk’, ‘walk’. All of these words have a silent ‘L’ in them, which makes them a little bit tricky to pronounce correctly. I’ve got a separate video that is all about silent letters in English words and I talk about the letter ‘L’ and lots of other silent letters in that video. You can check it out up here at the end of this video! OK, what about this one? How many times have you been asked to read a paragraph out aloud in front of the class and you’ve been reading and then you come across this and you think, ‘How on earth am I going to say that?!’ Lots of native English speakers actually mess this up as well and they’ll pronounce X-cetera or X-cetera and it should be pronounced ‘et cetera’, ‘et cetera’, ‘et cetera’.

Or ‘et cetera’, if you’re like me. OK this one is especially difficult! ‘Clothes’, ‘clothes’, ‘clothes’. Now the reason why it’s especially difficult is because of the two final consonant sounds, the ‘-th’ and the plural sound. Now this noun is of course, always plural. Clothes refers to shirts, shorts, trousers, jumpers, jackets – anything that you wear is your clothes, are your clothes! But ‘clothes’, ‘clothes’ not ‘cloths’, not ‘close’ and not ‘clothes’ either! The difficult thing about the pronunciation of this word is the two consonant sounds. together. Both of those sounds are voiced consonant sounds so the sound is made here in your vocal cords. Now the thing to remember that’s really important is with that ‘-th’ sound you need to bring your teeth through – your tongue through your teeth! Now the ‘-th’ sound is very, very soft. It is definitely still there, it needs to sound different from the verb ‘close’. OK, which doesn’t have the ‘-th’ sound. This word has the ‘-th’ sound, ‘clothes’, ‘clothes’. It’s very short but it’s definitely there! I need to pack my clothes tonight because we leave early in the morning.

I need to pack my clothes tonight. ‘Jewellery’, ‘jewellery’, ‘jewellery’. Again, we’ve got an extra vowel here that we don’t need to pronounce. We don’t say ‘jewellery’, ‘jewellery’. It’s just ‘jewellery’ and actually in American English the spelling is slightly different to the British and the Australian version. And the American version should help you to pronounce this word more correctly. ‘Jewelry’, ‘jewelry’, so that’s gold, silver, pearls, diamonds, earrings, rings, necklaces – all of these things that we wear to make ourselves look more beautiful! I don’t wear a lot of jewellery myself. The only jewellery I wear is this ring and sometimes some earrings. ‘Architecture’, ‘architecture’. This one is so often mispronounced! I hear ‘architecture’, ‘architecture’, – which is incorrect! The ‘-ch’ sound in this word is a sound like in ‘cat’. ‘Architecture’, ‘architect’. ‘Architect’. It’s not the same ‘-ch’ sound that you hear in words like ‘chocolate’ and ‘cheese’, it’s a sound and there are quite a few English words that actually have this same pronunciation of the ‘-ch’ combination – words like ‘stomach’ and ‘ache’. The ‘-ch’ in all of these words is pronounced like a sound. My brother is an architect.

He went home early because he had a stomach ache. ‘Enthusiastic’, not ‘enthusiastic’ or ‘enthusiastic’, but ‘enthusiastic’. You have to work harder to get this one correct! So many of my students say “This one is too hard! I’m just not going to use this word!” and I say “NO, we are going to get it right, right now, together here in this lesson!” ‘Enthusiastic’. So what you need to do is break down this word. Start with the first syllable, Where is your tongue? What’s it doing on that final consonant sound? It’s at the top of your mouth and the ‘n’ sound is made back in the soft palate – it’s a nasal sound and to move to the ‘-th’ sound, you need to of course, bring your tongue down and out through your teeth. The tongue must come out through the middle of your teeth! If you don’t, you will mispronounce this word and you’ll say ‘enthusiastic’ or ‘enthusiastic’ instead.

You need to say See how I’m breaking that down for you? ‘Enthusiastic’, ‘enthusiastic’. Now you’re going to be enthusiastic about using that word! ‘Word’, ‘world’. and ‘work’. Now you’re probably mispronouncing these words because you are looking at the ‘-or’ and you’re trying to pronounce the vowel sound ‘or’, like in ‘door’. But this is incorrect, the vowel sound is actually as in ‘her’. ‘Work’, ‘world’, ‘word’. This is your eyes playing tricks on you! Your eyes are seeing these words, seeing the letters O and R and they’re telling you to pronounce ‘or’ but, in fact, you should be pronouncing for all of these words! ‘Word’. ‘World. ‘Work’. If you pronounce ‘or’, especially for this last one, ‘work’, it actually sounds a lot like the English word, ‘walk’. ‘Photograph’. Now perhaps you can pronounce this word correctly, ‘photograph’, but what about all of the other words in this word family? ‘Photography’, ‘photographer’, ‘photographic’. When my students mispronounce these words, it’s usually because they are stressing the wrong syllable. English words that have more than one syllable always have one strong stressed syllable.

Sometimes there are secondary syllables but there is always one main stressed syllable that is clearer and stronger than the others and the unstressed syllable – the syllable that’s not stressed – is often reduced down to a schwa vowel sound. Now the schwa sound is the lazier sound in English. That’s the schwa sound, it’s the laziest vowel sound in English. And these stress patterns are exactly what is different about the pronunciation of these words, so in the first example, ‘photograph’, the first syllable is the stressed syllable. You can hear it very clearly, ‘photograph’.

The second syllable is unstressed and it is reduced down to the schwa sound. ‘Photograph’, ‘photograph’, it’s very short, it’s very lazy, it’s not very strong at all. Now if you look at the second example, ‘photography’, you can hear the pronunciation is different and that’s because the second syllable is the stressed syllable in this word. ‘Photography’. ‘Photography’. Compare it to the first syllable where the schwa sound is – it reduces down to the schwa sound and you just hear ‘photography’.

‘Photographer’. The third example ‘photographic’, the stress is on the third syllable, so you can hear how much influence stress has on this word family. To correctly pronounce all of these words correctly you need to pay attention to the stressed syllable and that’s true for a whole range of different word families. ‘Economic’, ‘analyze’, ‘nature, ‘politics’, all of these words and their word families are influenced by stress in different ways. Well that’s my official list of the words that you are probably mispronouncing and I didn’t just make that list up, I built that list over years and years of coaching English students to improve their English pronunciation. They’re the words that students consistently get wrong! Many different students, many different times, they are the ones that are the most difficult for you to pronounce. I hope that you enjoyed this lesson, if you did make sure you subscribe by clicking the red button here. I mentioned a video about silent letters earlier in this lesson, you can watch it here and you can also watch my imitation lessons right here and those lessons are fantastic for improving your English pronunciation and expression by speaking with a native English speaker.

Thanks for watching and I will see you in the next lesson. Bye for now!.

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