IELTS Writing: Numbers and Pie Charts

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As found on Youtube

Fake Out | How to Use English Phrasal Verbs | Learn English Words

{“en”:”To fake someone out! to fake someone out is to trick, fool, or deceive someone on purpose. the action of doing this, the noun, is a fake out. you can use this in everyday life of course, but more commonly this is used especially in the world of sports! this is when a player does something to trick another player. he faked out the goalie by pretending he was gonna shoot at the top left of the goal, but then he shot at the bottom right. what a fake out! hey what are you doing at school? you told me that you were sick. I faked you out. I just wanted to surprise you for your birthday! have you ever faked someone out or been faked out? let me know in the comments. “}

As found on Youtube

Hypnotherapy in Brighton

Learn English Expressions: JUST IN CASE

{“en”:”Hello. My name is Emma and in today’s video I am going to teach you about a very important piece of vocabulary — it’s also very important when it comes to grammar — and that is the expression: “Just in case” or we can also say: “in case”. So, we use this a lot in English, so it’s very… It’s something very important for you to learn. So let’s talk about what it means and how we use it.

So, we use: “in case” or “just in case”-we use both-when we are talking about doing something to prevent a problem. Okay? So we’re talking about… Or doing something to prepare for a problem. So, we’re looking at a problem and we’re looking at preparation or prevention of that problem. Okay? So, for example: “Tonight, I am going to a restaurant.” I’m very excited. Now, the problem is I get cold very easily, and when I’m cold I’m not a very nice person; I get very cranky, and I’m not a good person to be with when I’m cold. So my problem is I get cold easily. What is my prevention or preparation for this problem? Well: “I will bring a sweater just in case I get cold.” Okay? And that way I will have a great time at the restaurant, hopefully. So my problem is being cold, and my preparation is I’m going to bring a sweater.

So, as you can see, if you think about life, we have a lot of these types of problems and we do a lot of things to prepare for these types of problems. So let’s look at some other examples. Okay, a problem is when it rains… Okay? A lot of the times when it rains, you know, I don’t like getting wet, so what do I do? Well, my preparation or prevention is I bring an umbrella, or maybe I’ll bring a rain jacket.

Okay? So: “I will bring an umbrella just in case it rains.” Another problem is if you work at 9am, you know, a lot of the times there’s a lot of cars; everybody’s going to work at the same time, there’s a lot of traffic. And if there’s a lot of traffic maybe you’ll be late for work. So what will you do for this problem? So, traffic is the problem or maybe going to work late is the problem, but what you can do to prevent or prepare for this problem is you can leave your house early.

So: “I leave my house early every day just in case there’s traffic.” Another example of a problem is maybe you’re going to visit your friend, and your friend gives you their address. Now, if you don’t write down their address, you’re going to be lost. I don’t know where they live. I need to go to my friends’ house, I forget their address; I don’t know where they live. So this is the problem. Especially if you’re very forgetful like me or you always forget people’s phone numbers or, you know, where people live, this is a big problem.

So what do you do to prevent this problem? Well, you write down their address. Okay? On a piece of paper, your friend tells you their address, you write it down. Why do you write it down? “You write down their address just in case you forget it.” Okay? You forget their address. So I’ve just given you some examples of where we would use “just in case”. There are a lot of examples for “just in case”. I want you to think about your life.

Is there something that happens every day to you, maybe you have some sort of problem or something you worry about? So think about that for a second. Is there something you worry about every day, and what do you do to prepare for that or to prevent a problem from happening? Okay? Maybe, you know, you’re worried about failing your test, so you might create a study group just in case. Okay? Or maybe, you know, your teacher gives you homework. Maybe you will do the homework just in case they want to see it. So, you see what I’m saying? There’s a lot of problems you might have, and a lot of preventions or preparations you do for those problems.

So try to think of one in your own life. Okay, so now we are going to look at the grammar of “just in case” or “in case”. Okay, so we’ve already looked at what are problems, and how we prepare or prevent problems. Now let’s look at some examples of: How do we create this sentence in a grammatical fashion? So, I have here the sentence: “I will bring an umbrella in case it rains.” Do you remember what the problem is? The problem is it rains, and the preparation is bringing an umbrella.

I have another sentence. “I will leave my house early in case there is traffic.” So, again, traffic is the problem, and leaving my house early is the preparation or the prevention of a problem. So, I have a couple of questions for you about the grammar. Okay? I want you to look at the sentences, both of these sentences: Is the problem…? So the problem we’re talking about, do you see the problem before or after the expression “in case”? So where is the problem? So we find “in case”.

Is the problem before “in case”, up here; or is the problem after “in case”? It’s after, right? So, “it rains” is the problem, so: “in case it rains”, these go together. What about down here? “…in case”, is the problem before the word “in case” or is it after the word “in case”? Well, the problem is traffic, so the problem comes after the word “in case”. Okay? So if it helps you to remember: “in case”… So we wouldn’t write this in a sentence. This is… We won’t put these brackets in a sentence, but just to help you in your head to remember: “in case” is with the problem, so these are like one unit, if that makes sense. Okay. And so if the problem comes after “in case”, what comes before “in case”? The preparation or the prevention. So after “in case” is the problem, before is the prevention or the preparation. Okay, so what verb tense comes after “in case”? So when we’re talking about the problem, what is the verb tense that we use when we’re talking about the problem? So I want you to look, here’s the verb and here is the other verb.

Is this the past, the present, or the future? If you said the present, you are correct. We use the present tense when we use “in case”. Okay? And so: “in case it rains”, we could put this… You know, imagine if I said: “I will bring a sweater in case it gets cold”, so the part after “in case” is always in the present tense. Okay. So another question you might be wondering: “Do ‘in case’ and ‘just in case’ mean the same thing? Can I use either, ‘in case’ or ‘just in case?'” “I will bring an umbrella just in case it rains” or “in case it rains”, they’re both correct. It’s your choice; you can use whichever one you prefer.

Okay, and these two sentences use the word “will”: “I will leave my house early”, “I will bring an umbrella”, so this is talking about, you know, doing something in the future, right? “In the future I will bring an umbrella”, or “In the future I will leave my house early”. Do we always use “will” when we use…? When we’re making these types of sentences? Can I say: “I always bring an umbrella in case it rains” or “I brought an umbrella in case it rains”? Can I use the past, present, or future, or is it always the future? Actually for “just in case”, you can use “will”, you can use the past tense, or you can use the present tense when you’re talking about the preparation. So the problem… We’re talking about a future problem, this stays in the present tense; but in terms of the preparation, it depends on when you do the preparation. So the key question here is: When did you prepare, or when did you prevent the problem? So I’ll give you some examples. Imagine for this one: Yesterday I brought an umbrella to work because today I knew it would rain.

So if in the past, if yesterday or earlier today, you know, I brought an umbrella, we could change this to: “brought”. “I brought an umbrella in case it rains”. “…in case it rains” stays the same. Okay? It’s always in the present. But before the preparation we can use the past. Or what about if, you know… For example, the second sentence, imagine I always leave my house early, every day. Okay? I always do it. It’s a routine. “I will leave my house early in case there’s traffic.” If it’s a routine and it always happens, I can use the present tense here, I can say: “I always leave my house early in case there is traffic.” Okay? Or if we’re talking about something I’ll do in the future to prepare: “I will leave my house early in case there is traffic.” So, bottom line, the key point here, the thing that you really got to remember: After “in case” this is always the present.

Okay? So, after the words “in case”, the verb is the present; but when you’re talking about what you’re doing, the preparation, it depends on when you prepare. If you’re preparing… If the action of preparing is in the past, you use the past; if it’s a routine that you always do, you use the present; or if it’s something you’re going to do, use the future. Okay? So let me think if I can give you another example. Okay, if we think about a test and studying, I can say: “I studied hard for my test yesterday in case my test is hard.” Or, sorry: I studied…

Yeah. “I really studied for my test yesterday in case the test is hard”, so we have it in the past, I studied in the past. Now if, you know, maybe I always study for a test and I always really study hard for a test, I can say it in the present: “I always study for a test in case it’s hard.” Or, you know, maybe I’ve never done that before, but maybe tomorrow I’m going to study, I can say: “I will study, you know, for my test in case it’s hard.” Okay? So it depends on when you’re doing that action. All right, so we’re going to look at a couple more examples, you know, to get you more practice and more familiar with “in case” and “just in case”. Okay, so in my life I get hungry a lot. And just like when I get cold I’m not really a happy person, when I get hungry I’m not a happy person.

So in order to make sure I stay happy, I always try to have food with me. So, for example, I’ve made a sentence with “just in case” or “in case”: “I brought a sandwich today in case I get hungry.” So what’s the problem here? The problem is when Emma’s hungry she’s a horrible person to be around. Okay? So, we have a problem: Emma’s hungry. So, what do we do to make sure Emma, you know, stays like a happy person? Well, we make sure she takes a sandwich with her, so that’s the preparation. Okay? And, again, after “in case” we have the problem, before we have the preparation. Okay, and this, again, is in the present tense. And this one is in the past tense because I already brought the sandwich. Okay? This is something I did this morning. Now, it is possible to change the structure of the sentence around.

You don’t have to, so if you think: “Wow, Emma, today I learned a lot, I don’t want to, you know, learn anymore”, that’s okay, you’ve learned a lot. But if you’re interested, we can also change the sentence and put it in the opposite way. So what do I mean by that? Well, in this case “in case” is the second part of the sentence; we can also put it as the first part of the sentence. “In case I get hungry,”-so it’s the exact same words, we just add a comma-“I brought a sandwich”. So it’s your choice, they have the exact same meaning. You can start with “In case” or “in case” can be in the middle of the sentence. But when you start with “In case”, just make sure you remember the comma. Up here there’s no comma. Okay? So, for a lot of people this is easier because they, you know, forget their commas, but we do use both. Okay, let’s look at another example. “I always keep medicine at home in case I _______ sick.” Okay? So if you think about it, a lot of people will have medicine for headaches, or for when they catch a cold, they keep medicine at home.

So what’s the problem here? The problem is getting sick. Okay? So, the problem is getting sick, and how do we prepare for that? Well, we have medicine at home. So, after “in case” I want to use the verb “get” here. What do I need to do to the verb “get”? Is it going to be in the past tense as in “got”, do I say “get”, or “will get”? What tense do I use? If you said “get”, which is the present tense, you are correct. Yay. Good for you. I hope you got that. “I always keep medicine at home in case I get sick.” And, again, this is in the present because it’s something we do as a routine, we’re always doing this. Okay, so the last example: “I’ll go early just in case there is a line.” So imagine you’re going to the movie theatre, and you know a lot of the times with movie theatres there’s a long line up -that’s a problem.

A long line up is a problem, so what do you do to prevent that problem or to prepare for it? Well, you go to the movie theatre early so you can line up and make sure you get a good seat. So, in this case I’ve used the word “just in case”. “I’ll go early to the movie theatre just in case there is a long line.” Do I need to use, like, all of this? Can I just say: “I’ll go early just in case”, and not even say this? That’s possible. So if you don’t even want to do this, you can actually just say: “I’ll go early just in case” as long as the person you’re talking to knows, like, the context and can understand what you’re talking about, and it’s obvious, you know, what you’re doing, you can just use “just in case” instead of the full sentence.

Okay? So, even up here: “I always keep medicine at home”, you probably keep medicine at home in order… Like, in case you get sick, it’s kind of obvious, so if you wanted to, you can just say: “…just in case”. Okay? So there’s a couple of ways we can use “just in case”. You’ve learned a couple of different ways today. You will hear all of these different variations in conversation, in movies, on TV. Again, “just in case” and “in case” is very common and very important; we use it a lot.

So you might hear any of these variations of it. So, I hope you have enjoyed this lesson. And just in case you want to practice more, you can come visit our website at www.engvid.com, and there you can do our quiz. Now, in case, you know, maybe you didn’t understand the video, like, completely or maybe there’s some confusion, in case you’re confused, watch the video again.

Okay? You can get a lot from watching these videos multiple times. I also want to invite you to come subscribe to our channel; there you can find lots of other videos on things like pronunciation, vocabulary, writing, IELTS. You know, we have so many different types of videos and, you know, on a lot of useful things like grammar and, you know, all sorts of different types of topics. So I really recommend you check that out. Until next time, thanks for watching and take care.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in Brighton

English Books: How to learn English with Harry Potter!

{“en”:”Hey, everyone. I’m Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this important lesson on: “The Secret to Mastering English!” And the secret is… -“Where am I? And who are you?” -“You’re in Hogwarts, Alex. And I’m Dumbledore.” -“No you’re not. Dumbledore looks different.” -“I shaved. Listen, Alex. I have an important job for you. Can you do it?” -“Anything for you, Dumbledore. What is it?” -“Your engVid students want you to do a lesson on Harry Potter. Here, take this and teach them.” “Thank you.” “You’re a wizard, Alex. Now, go.” We’re back. So, today we are going to talk about Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, chapter one.

Now, I know for many of you, Harry Potter was the first book you read in English. And the reason it’s a really, really good book for you guys to read is that it is the most popular book series ever, which means that you can find it in many languages, there have been movies made about it, and you can find a lot of discussion about the characters, the dialogue, the story. So everyone knows pretty much what happens in a lot of these stories. Now, if you don’t have a copy of the book, what you can do is get a print version or an e-book version on Amazon attached to this video.

What I recommend, though, if you want a more interactive experience with Harry Potter is that you get the free audio book. Now, you can get a free audio book of Harry Potter, not just this one, the entire series, by signing up for the free trial at www.audible.com, which is attached to this video. When you click on the link, you will have to go through a couple of different pages and signups, but at the end you do get the book for free. So go through it, sign up, get the book for free, and it’s an excellent audio book. Highly recommend it. Now, why should we read Harry Potter? Well, it has interesting characters; Harry, Ron, Hermione, the Dursleys, Dumbledore who I met today.

How cool was that? It has great dialogue, great plot, and the language is pretty easy to follow, but of course, it still has a ton of useful vocabulary. Not just for non-native English speakers, but even for, you know, kids who are already native speakers of English. And finally, it’s just magical. It’s a magical story, a magical book. I love it. It’s one of my all-time favourites, so let’s start looking at chapter one. So what I’m going to do is look at the actual text from chapter one. Not every line, of course, but I’m going to pick some very specific lines that tell us important details about the story or that tell us some important vocabulary that I think is going to be useful for English students.

Now, you notice I gave a page number to start this. I am going to be looking at this hard cover version of the book. This was published by Raincoast Books in Vancouver, so this was published in Canada. Maybe your version is this one, maybe it’s not. Maybe you’re listening to the audio version, in which case page numbers are not important. But if you want to follow with a physical copy, this is the version that I am using. Okay? Let me put this down. Here we go. Page seven. So we start Harry Potter by learning about the Dursleys, Mr. and Mrs. Dursley, and their son, Dudley. First we have this line: “Mr. Dursley was the director of a firm named Grunnings, which made drills.” So, a firm is a company, and Mr. Dursley was the director of this company, and they made drills. Now, drills are a power tool. Think of the tool that allows you to put screws into things, like: “[Drilling noise]”. That’s a drill. Okay? So he was a director of a firm named Grunnings, which made drills.

Now, we have a description of him: “He was a big beefy man”, “beefy”, think of beef. So he was a little bit fat, and: “…with hardly any neck”. Now, “hardly any” means almost zero. So, he was so big and round that you couldn’t see his neck. Okay? Hardly any neck. “…although he did have a very large moustache”. So, moustache. Right? Everyone knows what that is there. And: “Mrs. Dursley”-Mr. Dursley’s wife- “spent so much of her time craning over the garden fences, spying on her neighbours.” So, here is a picture of a fence. In your backyard you have a fence that separates your house from your neighbour’s house, and here is a picture of Mrs. Dursley craning her neck. So, “to crane your neck” is to stretch it almost to the maximum point, and she’s spying on her neighbours. So Mrs.

Dursley is a very curious woman. “The Dursleys had everything they wanted” -I’m going to step off camera for this- “but they also had a secret, and their greatest fear was that somebody would discover it. They didn’t think they could bear it if anyone found out about the Potters.” So, they’re a very happy family, they have everything they need, but they have a secret, a family secret: They are ashamed of part of their family, and that part of the family is the Potters.

Now, here: “They didn’t think they could bear it”, so if you can bear something or you can’t bear something it means that you can’t handle it, support it, survive it. So they would not be able to handle it if someone, if their neighbours found out about the Potters, part of their family. So the Dursleys have a very clean image that they want their neighbours to follow. All right? Let’s keep going. And we’re back. So, continuing with page seven: “Mrs. Dursley pretended she didn’t have a sister”, so she has a sister and she doesn’t like her sister, but she pretended, she acted like she didn’t have a sister because… Excuse me. I like magic. “…because her sister and her good-for-nothing husband were as unDursleyish as it was possible to be.” First, some excellent vocabulary, here. A good-for-nothing person is someone who is good for nothing. So, this is an insult, a negative, very negative thing to say about someone.

So: “Your good-for-nothing son”, “Your good-for nothing sister”, etc. Her good-for-nothing husband, he had no value, no use, were as unDursleyish as it was possible to be. You will never, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever use this word outside of this book. So, Dursley is the last name of the family, and I guess, you know, if you act in a specific way you are Dursleyish. “Dursleyish” is kind of an adjective that J.K. Rowling made here. And if you are unDursleyish, you are not acting like a Dursley acts. Next: “The Dursleys shuttered to think what the neighbours would say if the Potters had a small son too, but they had never seen him.” So, they shuttered to think. If you shutter to think, it means you are just very afraid of what other people would say about you. They didn’t want to think: What would happen if their neighbours discovered that their, you know, Mrs.

Dursley’s sister had a son, and they had never seen Mrs. Dursley’s son, Mr. Dursley’s sister’s son. It’s a mouthful. Sorry. Moving on to page eight: “Mr. Dursley hummed as he picked out his most boring tie” -I’ll get off screen, here- “for work and Mrs. Dursley gossiped away happily as she wrestled a screaming Dudley into his highchair.” So this is the morning routine of the Dursleys. Mr. Dursley hummed: “Hmm, hmm, hmm, hmm, hmm, hmm, hmm, hmm, hmm, hmm, hmm, hmm”, this is humming, so he hummed as he picked out his most boring tie for work, and Mrs.

Dursley gossiped… Phrasal verb: “to gossip away”. So, “to gossip” is to tell secret information or kind of talk about people when they are not there. Say: -“Hey, did you hear that [mumbles]?” -“Oh! Did you hear that [mumbles]?” This is gossiping. So she gossiped away happily as she wrestled… “To wrestle”, think of wrestling. She has a small child, his name is Dudley, into his highchair. So, a highchair is what you put babies in or young toddlers in to feed them. So in this book, their son, you know, Dudley, is very, very small. He’s just a baby.

All right. Let’s keep going. Okay, to continue: “None of them noticed a large tawny owl flutter past the window.” So, “tawny” is a colour. It means light brown, or a mix of brown and orange. Okay? So a light brown, brown-orange owl flutter past the window. So, when you think of a bird and the wings going… Just swinging back and forth, the wings are fluttering. Okay? So the owl flutter… Fluttered, past tense, past the window. All right. “At half-past eight, Mr. Dursley picked up” -phrasal verb, “picked up”-“his briefcase,” -for work, his case for work with his papers- “pecked Mrs. Dursley on the cheek and tried to kiss Dudley goodbye but missed, because Dudley was now having a tantrum and throwing the cereal at the walls.” So, a lot of information here. So, Mr. Dursley is getting ready to go to work. He pecked Mrs. Dursley on the cheek. So this is your cheek, a peck can be a quick kiss, like: “[Kisses]”, that’s a peck.

Also think of birds eating seeds, they peck, peck, peck, peck, peck, peck, peck. Okay? So this action is quick movement of the mouth, is a quick peck. All right? On the cheek. He tried to kiss Dudley, but Dudley was throwing cereal at the walls. So, a tantrum is like an emotional episode, a period where a child or an adult sometimes is acting really, really emotionally and angrily, like: “Ah.” If you go to a department store and you see a child lying on the floor crying, and the parents are saying: “Come on, let’s go, let’s go”, the child is having a tantrum. It’s not a nice scene. And: “There was a tabby cat standing on the corner of Privet Drive. What could he have been thinking of?” So before this line it is important to note that now Mr. Dursley has left his house, he’s in his car, he has left his driveway, and before this line he thinks he sees a cat reading a map.

Okay? So he’s like: “There’s a cat reading a map. Wait, wait?” So he sees the cat reading a map, he does what he keeps doing, he looks back and then he says: “Okay, there was a tabby cat standing on the corner of Privet Drive.” This is the street the Dursleys live on. “Ah, what could he have been thinking of?” What could Mr. Dursley have been thinking of? He couldn’t have seen a cat reading a map, could he? So a tabby cat…

Tabby refers to kind of like the fur of the cat. Any cat that has a lot of stripes of different colours, and usually an “M” pattern on their forehead is a tabby. Many native speakers only think of orange cats as being tabby cats, but it’s actually all cats, so we learned something new today. Yeah, I love this book, too. Okay, we’ll talk later. Okay, see ya. All right. So: “Mr. Dursley couldn’t bear people who dressed in funny clothes – the get-ups you saw on young people!” So before this, Mr. Dursley is driving to work and he sees lots of people dressed in really bright cloaks, which are these kind of long robes. Okay? So he couldn’t bear… He couldn’t handle people who dressed in funny clothes. The get-ups you saw on young people today. So, a get-up is kind of like a costume. Okay? Or a funny uniform. So if I say: “That’s a nice get-up”, that’s a nice kind of uniform or costume, or something that is different than a regular set of clothes.

So he’s saying: “These people are dressed weird on the street today. I think I saw a cat reading a map. There are people running around. There’s an owl.” And then: “Mr. Dursley was enraged to see that a couple of them” -a couple of the people on the street-“weren’t young at all. Why, that man had to be older than he was, and he was wearing an emerald-green cloak!” So he thinks: “Hah, these young people today with their weird clothes.” But he said: “No! This guy is as old as I am or older, so what’s going on here?” And finally: “Mr.

Dursley”… After getting to work. Now he’s at work, he’s at Grunnings. He’s in his office, he said: “Mr. Dursley always sat with his back to the window”… I’ll move out so you can read this completely. So he: “…always sat with his back to the window in his office on the ninth floor. If he hadn’t, he might have found it harder to concentrate on drills that morning. He didn’t see the owls swooping past in broad daylight, though people down in the street did.” So here we have a conditional, so: “If he hadn’t sat with his back to the window, he might have found it harder to concentrate on drills that morning”, so this book is written in the past tense. Here, we’re using the third conditional, so: “If he had not sat with his back to the window, he might have found it harder to concentrate on drills that morning.

He didn’t see the owls”-hoo-hoo-“the birds that are flying everywhere, swooping past in broad daylight”. So, swoop. Okay? Kind of these motions. Swooping back and forth. In broad daylight, this means in the open day. So everyone can see. It’s sunny and there are owls flying everywhere, which is strange because owls are night animals. Right? Okay, let’s continue. So, it is now lunchtime for Mr. Dursley at his firm, Grunnings, and what he sees are a bunch of men in green cloaks still walking around, so there are people dressed strangely around Mr.

Dursley’s workplace. It says that Mr. Dursley: “He eyed them angrily as he passed.” So, “to eye someone” is to look at them like this. So if he’s eyeing them angrily, he’s looking at them angrily. Okay? Now, you can use this to say that you have been, for example, wanting to buy something for a very long time. So if you want a new iPhone, for example, you can say: “Ah, I have been eyeing that phone for a long time.” You’ve been paying attention to it and looking at it for a long time.

So, he eyed the men in green cloaks angrily. Now, here he hears these men talking and he hears them say something about the Potters, their son, Harry. Wait a minute, why are these men whom I’ve never met in my life mentioning my wife’s family’s name and a possible son? So: “The Potters… Their son, Harry.” They say this, and then: “Mr. Dursley stopped dead. Fear flooded him.” This doesn’t mean he died, it just means he’s walking, he hears: -“The Potters… Their son, Harry.” -“Why? Why are they talking about me?” So he stopped like he was dead. Okay? “Fear flooded him.” So fear filled him.

Okay? Now: “Mr. Dursley stood rooted to the spot.” This is after work now, he’s going home, and after being hugged by a man in a violet cloak after work. So, at lunch he hears these men talking about the Potters, their son Harry. After work, a man in a cloak comes up to him, gives him a hug. And Mr. Dursley stood rooted to the spot. So, “rooted”, think of a tree. All right? Here’s the ground, you have a tree, and this tree has roots under the ground. So Mr. Dursley stood rooted like his feet had roots in them into the ground.

He couldn’t move because he’s so uncomfortable by this man in a cloak hugging him. And then he goes home. We’re on page 11. And Mr. Dursley asks his wife if she has talked to her sister lately, because he’s thinking about the cat with the map, the men with the cloaks, the mentioning of Harry and the Potters, and he’s at home, he said: “Have you talked to your sister lately?” And: “Mrs.

Dursley”-the wife-“sipped her tea through pursed lips.” So she does not like her sister or hearing about her sister. She sipped, like I’m going to sip this hot coffee through pursed lips. So, pursed lips are like this. Like… Okay? So, okay? Like she doesn’t want to say anything. So she’s angry. Pursed lips. “While Mrs. Dursley was in the bathroom,”-later in the evening- “Mr. Dursley crept to the bedroom and peered down into the front garden.” So, “to creep”, the verb “creep” means to move very slowly and quietly, secretly almost. Okay, so he’s creeping through his house, and he’s peering. So, “to peer” is to look with intensity, but with a little difficulty, like he’s looking, he’s trying to see something, but he’s just not sure what he’s looking for because it has been a really messed up, weird day for Mr. Dursley. Now it’s nighttime, the Dursleys have gone to sleep. Everyone on Privet Drive is in their beds, and on the corner of the street there is a man, Albus Dumbledore.

This Dumbledore right here. The man I spoke to at the start of this video, apparently, so he says. He’s got magic, so I guess it was really him. All right, so: “Nothing like this man”, like Albus Dumbledore… “Nothing like this man had ever been seen on Privet Drive.” So here you have the past perfect. So remember this book is written in the past simple, which means if something happened before, you know, the present of the book which is written in the past, it must be spoken in the past perfect.

So: “Nothing like this man had ever been seen on Privet Drive.” No one had ever seen a man like Albus Dumbledore. Page 13. We have Dumbledore, he’s walking to, you know, around the Dursley’s house. He sees a cat, and he says to the cat: “Fancy seeing you here, Professor McGonagall.” And the cat is actually Professor McGonagall who is another person from, later we learn Hogwarts, the school of magic, that’s what it is. Okay. So, if you say: “Huh, fancy that, fancy seeing you here.” This means it’s a surprise to see you here. Wow, it’s cool to see you here. Okay? I didn’t expect to see you here. So if you see something shocking or surprising in daily life, and you say: “Huh, fancy that”, then that means: “Well, isn’t that a surprise?” So this is more of British English than North American English, which is why it’s in this book.

Now, Dumbledore says this, and then Professor McGonagall is talking about today and everyone talking about the Potters, everyone talking about their son Harry, and everyone talking about you know who. Now, “you know who” whose name is Voldemort, is an evil dark lord. So McGonagall says about today with people talking about him: “People are being downright careless out on the streets in broad daylight.” So she is talking about the community of wizards, magicians, witches, and it seems like they’re celebrating something, and she’s saying: “They are not being careful enough.” So, “downlight careless” means absolutely careless without any care, without being careful. They’re so excited about something today in the magician community. And then Dumbledore mentions Voldemort. Professor McGonagall refers to Voldemort as “you know who”, and Dumbledore says: “Use his name.

His name is Voldemort”, and Professor McGonagall flinched at the mention of Voldemort. So when you flinch you kind of, like, put your body back, close your eyes like this, like… Okay? So, if Voldemort is a name that’s scary, that is not supposed to be said and Dumbledore says: “Voldemort” and she says… Not says, but goes… She flinches. Flinch. If someone comes up to you, for example, I’m coming up to the camera and I go… Did you flinch? Because you thought I was going to like hit you or something. Maybe we have 3D laptops now and my fist is coming through the screen. I don’t know. I erased this with my back, that’s okay. Page 16. Now, we’re not finished yet with all the activity on Privet Drive. “A small rumbling sound had broken the silence around them.” Rumbling, something that vibrates a little bit had broken the silence around them, so it’s quiet and in the background they hear: “[Rumbling noise]”. “Dumbledore and Professor McGonagall bent forward over the bundle of blankets.” So, before this, the rumbling sound is actually Hagrid.

Now, Hagrid comes on a motorcycle and he has a baby in his hand. It’s Harry Potter. And when he shows the baby to Dumbledore and McGonagall they bent forward over the bundle of blankets. “Bent” is the past of “bend”, so they bent forward. Right? To bend forward over the bundle of blankets. So if a baby is wrapped in a lot of blankets, we call this a bundle. Okay? A bundle of blankets. Now we’re nearing near… Now we’re nearing near? We’re nearing the end of chapter one. Now, Dumbledore asks for Hagrid to give Harry to him. He says: “Well, give him here, Hagrid – we’d better get this over with.” So, this is a complete expression: “to get something over with”. If I say: “Let’s get this over with”, it means: “Let’s finish this, let’s end it”, even though sometimes it’s unpleasant. So you want to do something that you don’t want to do, but you have to do it, so you say: “Let’s get it over with.” Right? Let’s finish it.

Let’s just… Let’s do it. Okay? So, Dumbledore takes Harry, and then Hagrid says goodbye to Harry, and then: “Wiping his streaming eyes on his jacket”, so “wiping”, wipe, wipe, wipe. “Wiping his streaming eyes on his jacket sleeve, Hagrid swung himself on to the motorbike and kicked the engine into life.” So, “streaming”. He was crying because there was this little baby, he’s giving him away, and he’s wiping his streaming eyes on his jacket sleeve. This is a sleeve on a jacket. He’s wiping his eyes on the sleeve, and he swung himself… “To swing”, okay? A baseball bat, you can swing a baseball bat. Hagrid swung himself on to his motorbike, and he kicked the engine into life and he flew away because it’s a flying motorcycle. Pretty cool. Finally, page 18 of chapter one. Dumbledore and McGonagall, they have been saying and talking about Harry a lot. So apparently last night Lord Voldemort killed Harry’s parents. Killed Harry’s parents. Okay? However, he was not able to kill Harry.

And somehow for some reason Lord Voldemort, this evil dark lord disappeared after not being able to kill Harry. So, they leave him at the Dursleys house. Harry is now going to stay with the only family he has left, the awful Mr. Dursley, the awful Mrs. Dursley, the awful Dudley Dursley because he has no parents anymore, and this is his only family. So Dumbledore writes a letter, puts it in the basket with Harry, they leave him on the door, and Dumbledore says: “Good luck, Harry.” “‘Good luck, Harry,’ he murmured.” To murmur is to speak softly because it’s nighttime. Kind of like… Not a whisper. A whisper is like this. A murmur is like this. Okay? So: “Good luck, Harry. Good luck.” And finally, Harry: “He couldn’t know that at this very moment people meeting in secret all over the country were holding up their glasses and saying in hushed” -shh, quiet, hushed-“voices: ‘To Harry Potter – the boy who lived.'” So, what is happening here is that everyone is celebrating, magicians and wizards all over England are celebrating because Lord Voldemort is gone.

He’s dead, and it’s because of Harry Potter and Harry Potter is now going to stay with his family, with his aunt and his uncle who are not very nice people. From here the story only gets more exciting and more interesting. All right, so this was a very long lesson. If you’re still here with me, thank you, and I hope that you enjoyed it. If you did enjoy it, don’t forget to like the video, comment on it, subscribe to the channel, and check me out on Facebook and Twitter. Now, like I mentioned at the start of this video: If you want to have a really interactive experience with Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone or any of the Harry Potter books, I really recommend that you check out the link to audible.com attached to this video for the free audio book.

Now, again, you will have to click probably two or three links after the original link to get to the end, but after signing up, you do get the free audio book and that’s pretty cool. So, again, audio books are great ways for you to practice your listening, to practice your pronunciation, to hear the natural speed of English being spoken fluently. So I really recommend that you do that.

Till next time, thanks for clicking. Bye.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Steps to Learning English: Where should you start?

{“en”:”[Singing] Hi. James. Greer. James Greer. From engVid. [Laughs]. Not Bond, and I know you think I was going to say Bond. I know. But listen, Bond always has an important mission he’s got to do, right? 007. And so do I. Today we have a mission. We’re going to learn how to study English. I know in many places, many websites, they tell you, and to teach you grammar and idioms and phrasal verbs.

But then, there’s the big question of you, and: How do you study, and how do you choose what is important for you at this moment? Maybe you’re advanced. Maybe you’re a beginner. Maybe you know this, and maybe you don’t. After today’s lesson and we do our mission, you’ll know exactly what you have to do. Okay? So, we’re going to go to the board in a second, and take a look. What steps should we take in order to learn? By the time you’re done this video, you’ll know exactly… Or you should know where you are, where you need to go, and when you’re going to be done. Ready? Let’s go. E. E is standing here saying: “Where do I start? Grammar, vocabulary, or speaking?” Common, and seems to make sense, I mean, you go to learn a language-right?-you go on a website, they start throwing things at you. You go to a school, they say you need this, this, and this.

But you don’t really know. So, I’m going to give you the tools to decide that. First thing we’re going to do is: What’s the first thing you need? Grammar? No. What? Conversation? No. Vocabulary. What? Well, look. If you can’t say: “bathroom” when you go to a country, you’re going to pee yourself. Okay? “Hungry”, you won’t get food. You don’t need to know everything to get basic information done. And that’s what we should look at first. Basic information for a beginner really is vocabulary. And instead of all the fancy stuff you need, you don’t need much. You need you, and a little bit of time, and to have some fun. Why? I’m going to suggest: For basic communication, get vocabulary. I’m telling you right now if I see you or any English-speaking person sees you, and you see… You say: “Drink. Thirsty.” There’s no grammar, but they’ll go: “Oh, the bar is over there.” If you say: “Washroom. Please”, they’ll go: “Oh, toilet is over there.” They use sentence, you use words.

Sometimes you just touch your belly and go: “Ahh!” They’ll go: “Oh, you want food.” You don’t need all that stuff. People will tell you you need to learn grammar, and this and that. You don’t. And here’s how you get your first vocabulary. Do what you love to do. Play video games. I’ve had… I don’t know how many students play video games, say they learned how to fire, duck, words that we wouldn’t teach them for a while, because they were playing games. Other people come in: “Dah-dah-dah-dah-dah, [sings]”, singing. I go: -“What the hell?” -“I love to sing”, and they sing a song, they sound like they’re just, you know, from this country.

Then they speak very terrible accent. You know what I’m saying, right? [Laughs] But when they sing, it’s like the gods have come down. I mean, literally, you go: “Are you…? You were born here, right?” Cool slang. You know? YOLO, you only live once. Right? ASAP, as soon as possible. When you do these things, you’re learning because you want to learn. You’re not even realising you’re learning, and it’s going to make you want to learn more because… You know, we’ll get to the second one and you’ll understand. But you want to communicate in a much better way. Okay? So, get the meaning of basic words. “Hungry”, “food”, “toilet”, “money”. You know that one, right? You need those things. If you have those things, you can start your adventure in learning English. Okay? And you’re going to do it by doing things you love. Video games, music, cool slang.

Right? Come on. Now we’re making language fun and easy for you, and that’s what we should do, because you’ll learn it faster. All right? And then here’s the bad news: Hard work is on its way, so let’s move over to the intermediate. So if you’re still on vocabulary and you can’t put a sentence together, you’re a beginner. Okay? But at least you’re better than other people. You know words in a foreign language. Cool. Intermediate is when we start, and I think you should introduce grammar. This is when your vocabulary is rich enough that you can say things like: “Need water.” Where? It’s not a sentence, so you kind of sound stupid. I’m saying it right out. You sound stupid. Had many students, brilliant people, sounding like… I called them kids. And I loved them. I thought they were great people, but I would call them kids because they sound like two and five year olds.

“Mommy, water, now.” Understand. Sentence? Not really. Grammar. Some teachers don’t think it’s necessary. It is. It’s like a skeleton in a body. Right? When you’re crawling on the floor, you still need a skeleton, something to hold everything together, but really it’s the muscles and everything else that make you move. But the skeleton is necessary or needed. Those are those bones. Right? These are the bones of the language. You got, you know, your vocabulary, but these hold everything together, that skeleton. Now, when you learn grammar, we do this to be understood.

We said basic communication. To be understood we need grammar. This is sound… And you can sound like you understand. “Oh! I can’t have your girlfriend and all of your money? Oh. I didn’t know that. I understand.” You sound like you understand someone. You can communicate an idea. “I would like to be a millionaire, but I don’t want to work.” See? I’ve communicated: “I am lazy, but I still want to be rich.” Like everyone in North America. Okay, but we’re going to take our vocabulary…

See, this is when you have the vocabulary, you take it, and you put it with some muscle. You put vocabulary and function words. That’s what grammar is. It’s the words that function. It’s the verbs. Right? It’s the pronouns. It’s all these things that go together. It’s like making a hamburger. Okay? You got your meat. Now you need a bun, some lettuce, and everything else. This is your grammar. This makes it good. Okay? So, now you can sound pretty intelligent, not like a child, but some people have great grammar skills and good vocabulary, but-and this is where we go to the advanced-they don’t sound like us.

They still haven’t got it quite together. We know you’re not from here. This is change it all. And this is something that I find interesting. Some students don’t want to do, they think it’s a waste of time. And then I remind them: In your country, are there people who don’t know how to read and write? What do you call them? Some people say (this is a fancy word): “They are illiterate.” I say: “No. They’re stupid.” Because you say: “Hey, read this.” They go: “I cannot read.” You go: “You’re stupid. Didn’t you go to school, stupid?” Don’t be stupid. Learn to read and write. It’s not just for that reason, for your ego that people…

It makes you feel good. It’s also because it teaches you how to think in the language. Huh? Well, when you write something down, you have to remember the author wrote it three years ago. The author is the writer of the book, could be a male, female, or whoever made it. They wrote it three or four years ago, and you’re not there. So when they write about it, they have to think in a way that you would understand it three years later, and not have to ask questions.

Because if you have to say: “I’m confused. What does he mean? Let me call him up. Yo, E, on page 47 you wrote this thing. It’s an awkward phrase. You got a dangling modifier, so I’m not really sure…” It doesn’t work like that. They have to write it properly so you understand it. This is when we become advanced, because you learn logical thought, how we put it together. When we talk about logical thought, we talk about syntax; how the words go together , how things flow, how we think. Every language is different, and the syntax is a bit different. Okay? This will make you think like a native speaker. You have to put the words and even the sentences in a way that makes sense to us. Okay? Remember I said you sound…? Here I meant not stupid. That was it, you don’t sound stupid. Reading and writing makes you sound intelligent, and there’s a difference.

Suddenly, I want to hear what you have to say, because you seem to know what you’re talking about, and you present your ideas in a way I can understand. It also gives you the time to think about the language, so it goes on in your brain, so it knows how to analyze and present the language for us. This is something people skip, because they want to speak, and don’t realize this is a very important part. Reading gives you an understanding of how we’re thinking. You read, you get that. When you write, you have to write in a way that we would understand it. Powerful stuff. And how does it do that? Well, we have three components or three parts. Number one, the grammar. See? Grammar we talked about. Grammar has to be in something you write. Okay? Then it has to be true.

What you say has to make sense to us. It’s logical. I can’t be just: “I am an alien, and I live in the sea, and I have fins and baby-back ribs.” It doesn’t make any sense, even if the sentence is perfectly grammatically correct. It’s like: “This is not true. I will not listen to you.” And then finally we have to connect them, and this is what we talk about syntax, and when we put all of these things together, suddenly you’re speaking and people understand you. Accent or no accent, you are an English speaker. Not quite. Almost. When we put all these three together, and we go to speaking, and you master speaking, which will happen if you take these steps – you will notice you are being understood when you speak. Not five times: “Sorry? Huh? Sorry? Sor-, sorry? Oh, okay. Oh, I’m sorry. No. Sorry?” No. You will speak, you will be understood. When I speak, and some of you think I speak very quickly. And you’re right. My students actually often laugh go: “You don’t speak quickly on those videos.

You speak quickly in real life.” But I like it when people understand me. You will find that you understand me more. You will have more understanding what I say, and English people say. You won’t be guessing what they’re saying. You will actually understand them. Finally, you know that accent that you really don’t like, and you wish you could get rid of? You will. Speaking and using a practice of speaking helps you with proper pronunciation. That’s what helps you with being understood, and actually helps you with understanding other people, because you realize it’s not the absolute pronunciation, but where you put the stresses, what the meaning is. Right? All this comes with language or speaking. You can communicate and have mastered the language. That’s what we talk about by speaking, and I wrote that for a reason. When you are speaking, it’s right or it’s wrong. There’s no time to think about it. That’s what your practice in reading and writing is for.

Okay? So once you can actually speak, you’re done. Congratulations. You’ve learned a new language. Now, look. I want to do… I want to go through a couple of hints to help you out in a second or two, and then I want you to go out there and practice. Figure out where you are. You’ll know, because I’ve already told you. You’re either a beginner and you got to work on your vocabulary. That means most of what I said you didn’t understand. Or you’re intermediate, you got something out of what I’m saying, but you know you can’t express yourself that way. You’re advanced, you’re already smart enough to be writing every day and reading every day.

Or you’re basically fluent and native. Get outta here. Go outside and play. That’s what you should be doing. You ready? Let’s go through those helpful hints. [Snaps] So, we’ve talked about where you might be as a learner; advanced, beginner, or native. Now, I want to give you some more basic hints on acquiring or getting the language. Are you ready? Okay, basic hint number one: 30 minutes a day goes a long way. Whether you’re a beginner, intermediate, or advanced, 30 minutes. If you’re not willing to spend 30 minutes learning, you really don’t want to learn. All right? You need to practice regularly. Give you a good hint or a good example. When you were a baby, you were trying to walk. You would fall down. You would never stand and walk, you kept falling. But every day you tried, and sometimes hours, hours, hours.

Then one day, you started to walk, then you started to run. If you told that baby that 30 minutes a day was a lot of work, you’d be sitting in a chair for the rest of your life. Right? So, 30 minutes a day. Hey, an engVid video is 15. Boo, half your work’s done. Am I a genius? Yeah. Helped you out. Okay, so 30 minutes a day is a good thing to do. Okay? It goes a long way to help you retain or remember the information. Number two: Spend five minutes and review what you did the day before.

I know, it’s 35 minutes, but it’s still not an hour. Okay? So, before, you know, you do your new lesson, think for five minutes: “What did I do yesterday when I did English? Did I…?” Was it…? Were you reading? Did you write? What did you write about? Were there any things you wanted to change in your writing? Okay? So, remember, in your 30 minutes, that can be 30 minutes of writing, 30 minutes of reading, 30 minutes of going through the dictionary looking for words you need, basic words. Right? Or, I don’t know, listening to, like I said, an engVid video.

Watching it twice. The first time, you watch it; second time, make notes about things you want to learn .Right? That’s 30 minutes. Painless. Five minutes review is good, because it’s like eating food. If you take a burger, just put it in your mouth, it’s not as good as when you take it, and chew it and taste it. When you taste it, that’s where the joy comes from. That’s what you should do with language. Just taste it. Play with it a bit. Number three: Imagine yourself in a situation where you have to use the English you’ve learned. That could be part of your 30 minutes. Read for a little while, stop, put the story in your head, close your eyes, and imagine it. If you imagine it, it becomes real. When it becomes real, it becomes useful. Okay? If you just write some grammar down and you write some rules, and you never think about using it, then guess what? You won’t.

So, why don’t we take a couple minutes with our review? Imagine. Okay? “I just learned this new vocabulary. James said something about a pharmacy. Now, imagine I had to go… What did he say I have to say? ‘Can you help me with…?'” Now, imagine asking the… There you go. Next thing you know, you’re in the situation, the words come out of your mouth. Practice. Number four: Set goals. What do you want to do with your English? I know.

“I want to speak English today.” It’s not going to happen. Sorry. Okay? Just like if you want a burger, you have to actually catch a cow, kill a cow, bring it to the store, grind it up or make meat for it, then put it on the barbecue. It doesn’t happen. Right? There’s many steps to it. So, in this case, set goals. Maybe a five-minute conversation with a native speaker. Two-minute, one-minute conversation. Maybe it’s learn turn… Ten words really well. Okay? So you read a book, you pick out ten words you don’t know, go to the dictionary, write it out, then write out sentences with those words. Talk to…

Try and use them in a conversation with somebody so that they become something you’ve digested, that means taken in and you understand. Okay? You understand it completely. Apply for a job. Here’s one. You… It’s the 21st century, bub. Get on the internet. “I would like to work for your company.” Send it out. Right? See what responses you get back. Now, most of them will say: “Hey, your grammar is really bad.” Right? Or you can do a phone interview. Say: “Hey, can we do a Skype interview for this job?” Practice. Just because you’re not living here right now doesn’t mean you can’t put it into practice. And through your mistakes, you can learn, and then go back and use that for your 30 minutes of work. Right? “They didn’t like my accent. It was too strong. Okay, work on pronunciation. They said my grammar skills seemed to be a bit weak.

Okay, work on grammar skills. My vocabulary was limited. I noticed I kept repeating the same thing. Okay, work on vocabulary. Work on synonyms.” You will start making your own lesson plan based on you, not on what some book or some teacher tells you to do. Finally: Travel. I should do, like, say this. Right? Travel. I know. This is not easy. You don’t have money. Right? You don’t have time. But why are you learning it? Everything you really want, you have to do something. We call it a sacrifice. You have to give something to get something you really want. You want to eat, you buy food.

The food’s not free. Right? You want to really use your language, you got to travel. You don’t have to be… Do a big trip. You can find things on the internet where it’s exchange. Somebody’s family comes to your house, you go to their house for two weeks, or something like that. Governments do exchanges where there’s learning programs. Right? Hey, you can go to startup programs. “Hi. I want to learn English. Send me to a country.” Some people, if you give a good enough story: “I live in a farm out in Lithuania.

My family is, you know… Always wanted me to do better with my life, and we know English is important. So, my father’s willing to give up three cows to have me go to Canada.” Put it out there. Somebody will go: “Oh, come on, man. I’ll give you the money.” You know, miracles happen. Things can happen, but you got to do something. Travelling is the one thing that makes you go out there, because you got to do something. You can’t pretend you want to learn, because you have to put your money there. That will be hard, and I admit that. But once you do, if you’re doing all of these things, there’s nothing sweeter than getting off a plane, and saying: “Hi. Can you help me this? I’m looking for a friend of mine”, and the other person going: “Sure, no problem.

Let me take you.” And you’re understood. Right? Cool? I think it’s cool. Anyway, where do I start? You know where to start now, whether you’re a beginner, intermediate, advanced, or you’re native. I’ve given you some helpful hints that you can use starting right this minute. Right? You’re watching one video, so 15 minutes of your time is done. Hit the next one, or go do the quiz.

All right? Cool. Listen, hope I’ve done my part for you. Now it’s time for you to do your part. Study, practice, review. And when you can and if you can, and if you can get the help, travel, see the world. All right? Listen, I got to go. You have a great day. All right? Don’t forget to do the quiz. Where? www, eng, as in English, vid, as in video. I probably did that backwards. Right? engVid. Doesn’t matter. You know. Go to www.engvid.com. Don’t forget to subscribe. It’s somewhere around here. Somewhere. Subscribe. And once again and always, thank you very much for being a part of our family. All right? Have a good one. Ciao.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Improve your English the CRAZY way!!!

{“en”:”Hi, there. Are you having problems or difficulties, or do you find it difficult to practice speaking English? Maybe you live in a country where nobody around you speaks English, or you’re the only person you know that speaks English. I’ve got some advice for you. So, how to help you improve your speaking or your talking in English. Goin’ crazy. Usually in English, we never say: “going” or “trying”. We say: “goin'”. So, any time in English you see this, we’re actually missing the “g”. So, probably you should say: “Going crazy trying to speak or practice English”.

But, in slang when regular speech, we say: “Goin’ crazy tryin’ to speak or practice English”. So, I want you to think about one thing. Crazy people, there’s one right here. I’m crazy, little bit. But when I say “crazy people”, I mean people who are mentally disturbed or have something really wrong with their brain. And we like to categorize people as being crazy, but they really are not insane. They just make crazy noises. So if someone is considered crazy, what do they do? Crazy people usually talk to themselves, they hear voices, especially if they’re psychotic, and they will take to anyone or everyone that will listen to them. So, my advice to you, secret number 42 of how to speak English, is act like you’re crazy, or just go crazy learning English.

The first one: crazy people talk to themselves. You are going to talk to yourself. If you want to really put… Bring this off and do it well, you could go on the bus [giggles] or on any kind of trans… Public transportation, go on the street in your city and just talk to yourself on the street. I don’t really recommend that. If you want to do that, you can. But talk to yourself, but record it. So when you do this, you’re actually listening to your English so you can catch your mistakes and you can listen to your pronunciation. And, really, what do you sound like in English? So, rule number one: you’re going to talk to yourself, but you’re going to record it so you can check your mistakes and you can see just how well you do speak. Because I bet you, you speak better than you think. Next one: crazy people talk about hearing voices. Now, I know you inside have a voice. You, like I, have an inner being, a voice inside your head.

Crazy people are known to have more than one voice. If you have this, you might want to seek some help. But when you hear voices, I want you to talk to yourself inside your head in English. When I lived in Japan, I learned to speak Japanese. I didn’t take a course. I don’t like studying. But my inner voice spoke to me in Japanese. So I would come back to Canada or I would go travelling, and I would actually speak to people who spoke English, they would ask me a question, I would answer them in Japanese because my inner voice was still talking to me in Japanese.

So, one really, really important and great thing that you can do is make your inside voice speak to you in English. This sounds crazy, but I guarantee you that it’s one of the ways that you know if you are coming actually bilingual (means you can speak two languages) or trilingual. So, if your inside voice can talk to you in two different languages, this is really amazing, and it means that your English is improving. Everyone has a different timeline. Some people can do this within a year, some people within months, some people it takes three or four years to do this, but once you have achieved this, woohoo, you’re almost there. And the last one: you’ll notice that if you see crazy people on the subway or you see crazy people in your city, they’re going to talk to any or… This means “or”, by the way. Everyone. They don’t care who it is. They’re not going to be picky and go: “I don’t want to talk to that person. I want to talk to everyone.” So, the more people that you can speak to in English, the better.

You don’t have to be picky. That means you don’t have to choose. Is it a beautiful girl? A handsome boy? Young people, old people, babies, children. Anyone that you know that speaks English, try and talk to them. Even in your country, you think: “Ronnie, there’s no one in my country that speaks English”, you might be surprised. You can find people on websites, and you can find other English speakers to talk to. So, go crazy, speak as much as you can, and learn English with me. I’m Ronnie, and I’m crazy. Good bye.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Study English – Series 1, Episode 12: Carbon Cycle

{“en”:”Hello, I’m Margot Politis. Welcome again to Study English, IELTS preparation. Today, we’re going to look at cycles, at phrasal verbs, and then we’ll finish with a bit of punctuation. But now, here’s a man who is a microbiologist and a mushroom grower. He’s talking about mushrooms, and the part they play in the carbon cycle. They occur naturally in the forests as wood degrading fungi.

That’s their job. When trees die, they grow on the tree. They break down the lignin and the cellulose, which is the most resistant form of carbon, and they break it down, produce mushrooms and, in turn, you end up with organic matter going back into the soil, and so the carbon cycle in the forest goes on. The speaker, Noel Arrold, is talking about how mushrooms grow naturally. They are an important part of the carbon cycle, but what is a cycle? A cycle is a process that is repeated over and over. It goes around and around. But how do we know this from listening to Noel? When trees die, they grow on the tree. They break down the lignin and the cellulose, which is the most resistant form of carbon, and they break it down, produce mushrooms and, in turn, you end up with organic matter going back into the soil, and so the carbon cycle in the forest goes on.

He says: and so the carbon cycle in the forest goes on. By saying the cycle goes on he is telling us that this process happens again and again. At the end of the description, you need to signal that the process goes back to the beginning again. We can say: The process goes on. The process begins again. The process repeats itself. In a cycle, there is no real end or beginning, because the process just keeps going. When describing a cycle, we need to start somewhere, then describe, in order, each part of the cycle. There are many different ways of describing the stages of a cycle. We can use transitional signals like when, once, then, or next. When speaking, you can also use pauses and intonation to describe a cycle. In written language, this becomes punctuation. Listen to Noel Arrold again describing the different parts of the cycle. When trees die, they grow on the tree. He says: When trees die, they grow on the tree. When trees die comma, they grow on the tree.

The first part of the cycle is that the trees die. The second part is that when the trees die, fungi grow on the trees. That’s the next stage. When trees die, they grow on the tree. They break down the lignin and the cellulose, which is the most resistant form of carbon, and they break it down, produce mushrooms. OK, he says that the fungi break down the lignin and the cellulose. They break down the tree. So the third stage is that the fungi break down the tree. Fourth, they produce mushrooms. When trees die, they grow on the tree. They break down the lignin and the cellulose, which is the most resistant form of carbon, and they break it down, produce mushrooms and, in turn, you end up with organic matter going back into the soil. He says in turn organic matter goes back into the soil. In turn signals the next stage of the process. In turn means next, or because of that.

That’s the fifth stage. The organic matter goes back into the soil. And then what happens? When trees die, they grow on the tree. They break down the lignin and the cellulose, which is the most resistant form of carbon, and they break it down, produce mushrooms and, in turn, you end up with organic matter going back into the soil, and so the carbon cycle in the forest goes on. The carbon cycle in the forest goes on.

The organic matter helps new trees to grow again, and then those trees die. We’re back to the first stage again. This is the carbon cycle. OK, now we’re going to look at some phrasal verbs. Phrasal verbs consist of a verb followed by a preposition. This forms a new verb, one sometimes related to the original verb, but sometimes not. Phrasal verbs are idiomatic. There’s no pattern to the meanings they take, and they often have a number of different meanings. You often can’t just guess the meanings of phrasal verbs, you have to learn them. Let’s look at the phrasal verbs in this clip. They break down the lignin and the cellulose which is the most resistant form of carbon, and they break it down, produce mushrooms and, in turn you, end up with organic matter going back into the soil, and so the carbon cycle in the forest goes on. There were four phrasal verbs. They were: break down end up and two using go – go back and go on.

Notice that sometimes the preposition will give you an indication as to what the phrasal verb might mean. Let’s look at these four. See if you can match the meanings. break up end up go on go back and finish continue decompose return Well break up means to decompose, go back means to return, go on means to continue, and end up means to finish. But notice that break up can sometimes mean finish as well – we can break up from school. In formal writing, we would be more likely to use words like continue or return, than phrasal verbs, which tend to be less formal.

Phrasal verbs are difficult to learn because there are so many of them. Look at go. We’ve already seen it with go back and go on, but there’s many, many more, and remember, most of these have more than one meaning. It takes a lot of time to get used to all the phrasal verbs and what they mean. You need to listen carefully to people speaking, and the way they use phrasal verbs. Another important thing to do is to write them down in groups – and buy a good phrasal verb dictionary. So pay attention to those phrasal verbs. Learning them in groups can be fun, and your spoken English will sound much more natural. Now we’re going to look at some writing tips. For variety, it’s important that you use a lot of different of sentence types, of different lengths. The difficult thing is finding the balance.

You can join together short sentence using conjunctions, but what do you do with sentences that are too long? This sentence has many ideas, all joined together with ‘and’. How many ‘ands’ are there in the sentence? They break down the lignin and the cellulose, which is the most resistant form of carbon, and they break it down, produce mushrooms and, in turn, you end up with organic matter going back into the soil, and so the carbon cycle in the forest goes on. There are four ‘ands’. This sentence is too long, and should be edited. The ideas can be broken down into smaller groups and shorter, clearer sentences. There are several ways of doing this. We can use punctuation, conjunctions and connectors. So let’s have a look.

Here’s the full sentence. We can start by using punctuation. Use a comma to separate clauses. Use full stops to separate complete ideas and you can replace some of the ‘ands’ with full stops, but remember the new sentence must now start with a capital letter. Now we have a clear paragraph, expressing a number of ideas with different kinds of sentences. And the carbon cycle goes on, but we can’t go on – it’s time to end this episode of Study English, but I’ll see you next time. Bye bye.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

IELTS General: Writing Task 1 – 14 Top Tips!

Hi. I’m Rebecca from engVid. If you need to do the IELTS general exam, I’m sure it’s for a very important reason. Perhaps you’re trying to immigrate to another country, or get admission to a college program, or join a professional training program. Whatever your reason, I know you want to get the highest marks possible. Right? Of course. So I’m going to help you to do exactly that in one particular area of the exam, and that’s in your writing section. Now, in the writing section there are two parts, one is a letter and one is an essay. In this lesson we will focus on how you can get the highest marks possible in the letter-writing section.

Okay? The 14 tips that I’m going to give you I promise you, if you apply each one of these things, step by step you’re going to get more and more marks. Okay? So stick with me and we will go through them. Let’s get started. So, the first thing you have to identify when you read the letter-writing task is: What type of letter am I being asked to write? Is it a formal letter, is it a semi-formal letter, or is it an informal letter? Well, how do you know that? Well, you can know it in a few ways and I’m going to explain them, but one of the ways that you can know it is to look at the second point that you need to understand, is to identify the purpose of the letter because some purposes are more formal than other purposes. All right? For example, some formal letters might ask you to request information; or apply for a job; or complain about a product or a service, maybe to an airline, maybe to a store, something like that; or to make a suggestion or a recommendation.

All right? To a shopping mall, to a restaurant, something like that. These are more formal situations. These are when we are writing to people or companies that we don’t know. All right? That’s the clue: You don’t have anybody’s name, you just have the name of the company. All right. Semi-formal letters might include things like this: Complaining to a landlord; or explaining something, a problem or a situation to a neighbour; or asking a professor for permission to miss an exam or to submit your assignment late. Whatever it is. Okay? The details vary. Doesn’t matter. And here, what’s…? What identifies the semi-formal? The semi-formal we know it’s still a kind of a formal situation, but here we usually do know somebody’s name.

You would know the name of your landlord, or your professor, or your neighbour, for example. Right? So that means something in terms of the way that you write the letter, the language, the tone, the style. All of this is affected by whether it’s formal, semi-formal, or informal. And I’ll explain more to you as we go along. Now, examples of informal letters might be where you’re being asked to invite a friend, or thank a friend, or apologize to a friend, or ask for advice from someone that you know. Okay? Here what’s important is that you really know this person well and you’re probably going to call them by first name. So I’m going to explain exactly how all of this translates into the next step, which is how you begin your letter. So the first step was to identify the type of letter. Second step, the purpose. Now the third step is to open and close the letter correctly.

Once you’ve done steps one and two, you will know how to do this step. Because if it’s a formal letter then you start with: “Dear Sir” or “Madam”, and you end with: “Yours faithfully”. Okay? That’s how it is. If it’s a semi-formal letter, you will start with something like: “Dear Mr. Brown” or “Dear Ms. Stone” or “Mrs. Stone”. “Ms.” Is when you don’t know if a woman is married or not, or if she’s just a modern woman. And you end the semi-formal letter with something like: “Yours sincerely”. Okay? What we’re trying to do is to match up the formality of the situation with these terms that we’re using. Okay? The opening and closing salutations they’re called, these are called. All right? Next is the informal one. So here, you know the person really well, it’s your friend or a family member, and so you know… You’re going to call them by first name.

Right? So you might say: “Dear John”, “Dear Susan”, and then because it’s a warm friendship or relationship, you can end in a warmer way by saying: “Best regards” or “Warm wishes”. Now, what makes it a little bit easier for you and this is a clue is that usually in your letter prompt, in the task that the IELTS exam gives you, they will give you the letter situation and then they’ll say: “Start your letter with ‘Dear Sir’ or ‘Madam’, or ‘Dear Mr. So-and-so’, or ‘Dear John’.” Now, that helps you a lot because now you know if it’s going to be a formal letter, a semi-formal letter, or an informal letter, and you will know how to end your letter and you’ll also know what to say in your letter and how to say it, which is what we’re going to look at next. Okay, number four: Start the letter appropriately. That means based on whether you decided it was a formal letter, semi-formal, or informal – you need to use appropriate language. Right? Let me give you an example. For formal or informal letters, we could start with something like this: “I am writing to inquire about…” Okay? “I’m writing to inform you that…” whatever the situation is.

Or: “I’m writing in connection with…” Okay? These are some of the standard expressions that we can use when we start formal or semi-formal letters. Look how different that is from the informal ones. Now, what happens in an informal situation? Here we know the people, so first we want to acknowledge the relationship. We don’t start talking about business. Here, these are strangers, we don’t want to waste their time, we don’t want to be friendly here, we just want to get down to business. But here you want to be warm, you want to be friendly because these are people you know.

So you might start with something like this: “I hope you and your family are all well.” Okay? That could be your first sentence. You know what? And in fact in your first paragraph you’re probably just going to talk about nice things, and only in your second paragraph are you going to get down to tell them exactly why you’re writing. Okay? But first you want to say… Tell them… Ask them how they are, and things like that. Another way you could start an informal letter is: “How have you been? It’s been too long since we were last in touch”, and so on.

Okay? This is just to give you some idea. I’m going to later tell you where you can go to refer to sample letters, model letters that you can read so that you really become familiar with the entire format. Okay? All right. Now, number five: Use standard written expressions. What does that mean? Look, the reason it takes you a longer time to write a letter than let’s say someone who has been speaking and writing English all their life is because we have picked up the standard expressions that are used when we write, and you need to try to do that. That will save you a lot of time and it’s very important, of course, on an exam to write as fast as possible.

It’s also important all your life to write email as fast as possible. So, by learning these standard written expressions you will be able to get higher marks and save time and effort. So what are some of these standard expressions? Well, let’s look at one example when we are asked to apologize about something. So if it’s a formal situation, you could say something like: “My sincere apologies for missing the meeting” or “missing the conference”, something like that. Okay? If it was an informal situation and you’re writing to a friend or something like that, you could say: “I’m very sorry for missing your wedding.” Okay? See, you’re still apologizing, but when it’s formal you use certain expressions, and when it’s informal you’re going to use other kinds of expressions.

But these are still expressions which you can learn. And again, you can download a list of these kind of expressions from the resource that I’m going to tell you about. Now, let’s say you are asking for something, you’re making a request, if it’s a formal situation you could say something like: “I’d be grateful” or “I would be grateful if you could please send me the information as soon as possible.” Okay? For example. And if it’s more informal you could say: “Could you please send me the book as fast as you can?” Okay? So you see that the tone varies based on whether it’s formal, informal, or semi-formal. Okay? Let’s look at some other points. Okay, number six: Use correct spelling. Now, you’re going to say to me: “Rebecca, I know that”, and I know you know that, but unfortunately sometimes even on the IELTS students are still making mistakes on words like these which you know you’re very likely to use so you want to make sure that you really know how to spell these words. Of course you can’t know every word you’re going to use, but there are some words you can definitely know will probably be there.

So, for example: “sincerely”, people forget the “e”; “faithfully”, people forget that there’s two l’s; and “connection”, people forget that there are two n’s, that kind of examples. Okay? So just read over… When you read over many sample or model letters you will see and you will find the words which appear very often, and make sure that you know how to spell those words so that you get higher and higher marks which is our goal. Okay, number seven: Divide the letter, your letter into paragraphs.

Now, I know you know that, but let’s just review it. So of course you will have an introduction and you will have a conclusion, and usually IELTS letters in the 20 minutes that you have and in the situation that they’ve asked you to write about, usually IELTS letters have about four paragraphs. Okay? So, introduction, then a second paragraph will be describing the problem or the situation, the third paragraph will move into the solution or what action you’re asking someone to take, and the last one is the conclusion, just the ending. Okay? So make sure you divide your paragraphs… Your letter into paragraphs. Now, when you do that there are two ways to do it. One way is to indent to show that you’re starting a new paragraph.

What does it mean to indent? To start a little bit from the left side. Okay? So don’t start here, start inside. Or you can start every paragraph from the left, what we call flush left, but then you have to leave a line in between to show that this is in fact a different paragraph. Otherwise they… The examiner will think that you’ve written one solid piece of writing in your letter instead of writing in paragraphs. Okay? So make sure you do that. Next: Use clear, legible handwriting. Now, on the IELTS in case you didn’t know, you have to actually write by hand. You can’t use a computer. So you have to make sure that your handwriting is clear and legible. “Legible” means that someone can read it. Don’t write like a doctor, even if you’re a doctor because then the examiner will not be able to understand and won’t be able to give you all the high marks that you want.

So, make sure… Also some people when they’re cursive… For example, when you write with cursive writing-okay?-handwriting which is joined. Right? Some people have difficulty with some of the letters, like “n” and “r”. For example, an “n” or an “r”, if you don’t make it properly it could look like another letter, and then to the examiner that could look like a spelling mistake and then you would lose marks. So make sure your handwriting is clear for this reason that you don’t want the examiner to consider it a spelling mistake, because then they have to reduce your marks.

Okay. Next, you are asked to write and you should write 150 words. How do you know what 150 words is? By practicing and checking lots of times, so practice writing letters. If I had an IELTS exam coming up, I would write a letter and an essay every single day so that I’d feel completely comfortable and confident, I know exactly what I’m going to do, and that’s what you go ahead and do.

And then you will have a feeling and a knowledge of what 150 words is. Okay? Make sure you know. Because if you write less than 150 words, you will lose marks. If you write more than 150 words, you will not lose marks. Okay? So make sure you write at least 150 words. But what’s also important, I said here that if you write more you’ll get… You’ll still be fine, you won’t lose any marks, but you don’t want to spend too much time because you need to finish in about 20 minutes. As I mentioned at the beginning, there are two tasks in your writing section, the letter plus the essay.

The essay is worth twice as many marks, so you want to make sure that you leave enough time, about 40 minutes for your essay. Right? This is also very important. All the marks count. They check… They give you marks separately for the letter and they give you marks separately for your essay, and then they give you a separate score for that, and finally they combine everything. So everything matters, but make sure you finish this part, the letter in 20 minutes. And again, the way to be able to do that is to practice. Practice and practice and practice. So you will write 150 words in 20 minutes and so on.

Okay? With the paragraphs and all the other rules that I told you about. Okay. Now, number 11 tells you to include all three bulleted points. What do I mean by that? If you have looked at some sample letter tasks that appear on the IELTS exam, they give you the situation and then they give you a second section which says: “Include this information in your letter”, and they tell you three points. They’re usually bulleted points. Okay? When they have a little dot like this it means it’s a bullet. And you must do those things. If you don’t do one of these you will definitely lose a lot of marks. So, for example, suppose it was a letter that you’re being asked to write to a landlord. It might say… Or, sorry. You want to write a letter, let’s suppose, to your landlord because the neighbour is making a lot of noise every night and you’re having a lot of problems. So they will say: “In your letter explain the situation”, so you have to make sure you do that. Next: “Describe why it bothers you.” Tell them you’re a student.

I mean, you need to make up a lot of information here. They don’t tell you exactly what to write. Everyone on that… In that examination hall is going to write a different letter, but you have to include certain points. And third, maybe suggest a solution. What are you going to do? So if you leave out one of these, you will lose marks. So don’t do that. Always make sure whatever they have asked you to include, you include, and then include whatever else you have time for that makes sense according to the task you have been given. Okay? And a few more important points which we will cover next. Okay, the last three points, which are also very important for you to get that really high score.

Here we go. We’re going to start from here and go upwards. Okay? There is a reason behind this. Okay, number 12: Understand the scoring criteria. What does that mean? You’re going to get your points, or mark, or grade based on certain things that the IELTS examiners want you to do in this task. So let’s understand what those four things are. Number one is task achievement. That’s a big word which simply means they want you to do everything you’re supposed to do in the letter. Do all. Give a full response. Remember those three points and everything? Make sure you include all the bulleted points, you do what they ask you to do. And that you should write at least 150 words. You will see that in their criteria a lot of the details of it is what I have covered also for you in these 14 points.

All right. Coherence and cohesion. “Coherence” means that you present your ideas logically, it makes sense, you used paragraphs that are structured. Okay? And “cohesion” means that it all goes together in a way that makes sense. For example, your ideas should make sense, they should sort of stick together. And you should use standard expressions that we talked about for apologizing, for thanking, for making a request and so on. Okay? The third point is Lexical resource they call it. What does that mean? That means they want to make sure that you’re using your vocabulary correctly, naturally, fluently. Okay? Lots of varied vocabulary. Not the same words again and again. The last one, they also want to make sure that you use correct spelling. They do minus marks if you get… Make spelling mistakes. Okay? So be careful of that. We’ve talked about it before. And the last one is grammar range and accuracy.

They want you to use varied grammar structures. All right? To write different kinds of sentences; simple sentences, complex sentences, compound sentences. All right? Don’t just write the same kind of sentences. And use correct punctuation and capitalization, which goes with proper English writing. Okay. Now, let’s go upwards. What’s the other really, really important thing that you need to do to get very high marks in this letter-writing section? Write a letter every day. Practice and practice this letter writing. But there’s a second part to that. Practice and get your letters or letter checked by an IELTS teacher. Ideally, an IELTS teacher. Not only an English teacher because not every English teacher has IELTS experience or understands this exam, or the demands of this exam. So the best… Always try to get the best teacher you can get who really knows what you need to do. So, try to get your letters checked by an IELTS teacher because if you keep practicing every day and nobody checks it, that’s tricky. Okay? There are two sections of this exam which you can really cannot prepare for by yourself according to me, and I’ve been teaching for a long time, so they are speaking and writing.

Somebody has to give you feedback. When you get that feedback you will know what you need to improve and correct to get that higher score and also to improve your English. So make sure you get some feedback somewhere along the way so that you know what’s strong and what’s weak. Okay? And last: Read model letters from reliable sources, but don’t memorize them.

Okay? Don’t memorize. Don’t try to memorize the entire letter because you don’t know exactly what you’re going to get. But it will help you a lot to read sample letters and only from reliable sources. For example, I wrote a website called www.goodluckielts.com and there, there are many sample letters, sample letter topics, and you can be sure that the English there is perfect. Unfortunately there are a lot of websites today, and not all of them have perfect English even in their so-called model essays or model letters.

Okay? So make sure whenever you go to a site that it is a site that you can be sure of so that you learn the right things and don’t do any of the wrong things. Okay? So, what do you do now? Well, I suggest these things: Go to our website at www.engvid.com. Why? Because there you can download for free a resource which will contain all 14 of these points-okay?-for you. So in case you didn’t write them down, don’t worry, I’ve written them all down for you clearly. Plus you will get those expressions, those standard expressions that I mentioned you need to use to make your letter writing easier. You also will get sample letter topics so that you get some idea of what is a formal question look like, a semi-formal, an informal. And also sample letters, which I’ve written for you. Okay? So please grab that resource. It’s free and it’s available for you, for anyone who wants to download it.

Okay? And while you’re there also check out our website because we have lots and lots of other resources which can help you, and lots of videos and lessons which can help you do better on your IELTS. And subscribe to my YouTube channel because that will really help you improve your grade in terms of very many aspects that go into making a really good English speaker and English writer. All right? I wish you all the best with your IELTS and with your English. Thanks very much for watching. I know you’re a serious student, and I’m sure you’re going to do well. All the best. Bye..

As found on Youtube

Learn English: 11 ‘mind’ expressions

Hello. My name is Emma and in today’s lesson I am going to teach you a bunch of new vocabulary expressions. These expressions are all very common and very useful. So, the expressions we’re going to learn today all have the word “mind” in them. Okay? And there are a lot. I’m not even covering all of them because there are so many expressions in English with the word “mind”, so we’re only going to cover some of them, but we’re going to cover the main ones. Okay, so, when we talk about “mind”, there are different ways we’re talking about mind. “Mind” can have to do with the brain and with thinking or thoughts. Okay? So, sometimes when we’re talking about mind we’re talking about our brain or we’re talking about our thoughts. Sometimes we’re talking about something totally different with mind. Sometimes when we’re talking about mind we’re actually talking about being polite. For example: “Do you mind?” this is something where you’re being polite. And then we also use “mind” when we’re telling somebody to pay attention to something.

For example: “Mind the gap” or “Mind the hole”. So we have these three times where we’re using “mind” and we have a lot of different expressions for each of these different categories. So we’re going to go over each of these. I’m going to teach you a bunch of expressions where “mind” has to do with thought or brain, I’ll teach you a lot of expressions where it has to do with politeness, and then I’m going to teach you a lot of “mind” expressions that have to do with paying attention. But this is pretty much one way you can look at these expressions. So let’s get started by talking about… When we’re talking about mind, and thoughts, and the brain. So, first, when we talk about “mind” one meaning of “mind” can have to do with pretty much the brain, but it’s not exactly the brain. Okay? So your brain is in your head and it’s a physical thing. You can touch the brain, you can feel the brain, you can see the brain, smell the brain, so it’s physical. Mind is not physical.

You can’t see the mind because the mind is where your thoughts are, where your memories are, and these are things you can’t really see or feel, but they’re somewhere in here; we just can’t see them because they’re not physical. So, for example: Einstein, very famous scientist: “Einstein had a brilliant mind.” Okay? So this means Einstein had brilliant thoughts, he was very smart. He had, you know, brilliant ideas. These things are all in his mind. So it’s similar to brain, although not exactly the same thing, it’s very similar to brain.

We can also say: “psychologist”. A psychologist is a job and people who are psychologists, they study the human mind, meaning they look at the brain and they look at people’s memories, they look at the way people have ideas, and they think about: “Where do these things come from?” Okay? So they study the human mind. So, a lot of the times when we use the word “mind”, we’re talking about kind of your brain and your thoughts. You know, we might say: “Oh, Beethoven had an incredible mind”, or you know: “In your opinion, which minds were the greatest of the 20th century? Who had the greatest mind?” Meaning: Who had the greatest ideas, and thoughts, and pretty much brain? Okay, so that’s “mind”. Now, let’s look at another way we use “mind” and that’s in the expression: “on someone’s mind”. So this is a very common expression. In English we often ask: “What’s on your mind?” Or we also say: “I have a lot on my mind.” So, what does: “on my mind” mean? And make sure you have “on someone’s mind”, so it can be: “on my mind”, “on your mind”, “on her mind”, “on John’s mind”, you can pretty much put any person here.

What does it mean? Well, when we talk about “on our mind” we’re usually talking about problems, so we’re usually talking about problems that we are thinking about. These are thoughts, we’re thinking about something so it’s on our mind. So, let me give you an example. If I ask you: “What’s on your mind?” I’m asking you: “What are you thinking about right now? What’s on your mind?” And you might tell me, you know, some problem you’re having. “You know, I had a fight with my brother. That’s on my mind right now, that’s what I’m thinking about.” You can also say: “I have a lot on my mind.” When somebody says this it means they’re saying: “I’m thinking about some problem I’m having”. “I have a lot on my mind”, it means I’m thinking about a lot of problems right now or a big problem I have. So you’ll see often in TV or movies somebody says: -“What’s wrong?” -“Oh, I have a lot on my mind right now, sorry.” Okay? Meaning: “I have a lot of things I’m dealing with at the moment” or “I have a lot of problems in my life”.

Okay? So: “on my mind” has to do with thoughts, often it has to do with problems and thinking about problems. Now, let’s look at some other examples with the word “mind” when we’re talking about thoughts and the brain. Okay, so our next expression also has to do with thinking, thoughts, and the brain, and that’s: “have in mind”. Okay? So: “have in mind”. So, when you have something in mind or someone in mind, what it means is that you are thinking about a person for a position…

So, for example: -“Who are you voting for?” -“I have Trudeau in mind”, so I am thinking about Trudeau for the position of Prime Minister. Or, you know, maybe if you’re following American politics, you know, if Hillary Clinton is running, you might say: -“Who are you voting for?” -“Oh, I have Hillary in mind.” This could also be for a promotion at work. Maybe you need to hire somebody for your company or promote somebody, so you want to give somebody a job. -“Who do you have in mind for the job?” -“Oh, I have my sister in mind” or -“I have George in mind. He’s a good employee.” So it’s where you’re thinking or it’s like your opinion about a person for a position. You think this person is good for this position, so you have this person in mind for this position. We can also use it with a thing also. It doesn’t always have to be a person. For example, when we are thinking about something, some sort of object that is right for a situation.

So, for example, you know, I’m pretty hungry right now, I’m thinking about dinner. So somebody might say: “Oh, what do you have in mind for dinner?” So: -“What are you thinking about for dinner? What is right for dinner?” -“In my opinion, I have pizza in mind.” That’s what I’m thinking about, I’m thinking about pizza. Pizza is right for this situation. Okay? So, again, we can use it either with a person or a thing, but you’re pretty much saying that this is right for this situation in your opinion. Okay. Our next expression is: “lose someone’s mind”. Okay? I really like this expression. When you lose your mind it means you go crazy. So, for example: “I’m losing my mind. The cat is speaking English.” Okay? So this means I’m going crazy because cats, of course, don’t speak English, so I’m losing my mind. We can also use it if somebody’s doing something very strange, you know: “I think my dad has lost his mind. He’s, you know, wearing a winter jacket and it’s summertime. I think my dad has lost his mind.

I think my dad has gone crazy.” So, we use this expression a lot, especially in conversation. All right, now let’s look at some other expressions to do with the mind. Okay, so our next expression is: “cross someone’s mind”, so this could be: “cross my mind”, “cross your mind”, “cross her mind”, “cross his mind”, and what it means is when we think of an idea very quickly. Okay? An idea comes into our head very quickly.

So, for example: “It just crossed my mind that I need to buy bread today.” It means I’ve just really quickly come up with this idea. Or: “It crossed my mind that I should bring an umbrella because it’s going to rain.” So it just means a quick idea. Okay, our next expression: “Give a piece of someone’s mind.” I really like this expression. It means when you’re giving someone an angry opinion. Okay? So, when you give a piece of your mind, you’re usually angry like this. So maybe, you know, you want to call your telephone company and you’ve been waiting, and waiting, and waiting, and nobody’s answering the phone. You might say to yourself: “I’m going to give them a piece of my mind.” It means: “I’m going to give them my angry opinion.

I’m so angry right now.” So: “She gave them a piece of her mind.” Okay? If I ever meet… You know, like, maybe there’s somebody you don’t like: “If I ever meet Johnny I’m going to give him a piece of my mind.” It means I’m going to tell him my angry opinion about him. Okay? What I don’t like about him. Okay, the next one is also an expression, I love this expression actually. When your “mind goes blank”. Okay? This happens to me all the time. What it means is when you forget everything. Okay? You forget what you’re going to say, you forget what you’re supposed to do, you forget everything, and your mind… You don’t remember what you’re supposed to do. So, for example, if you have ever taken a test and you get the piece of paper, you get the test, and you look at it and suddenly: “Oh my god, I don’t remember anything. Oh my god, I’ve forgotten everything.” That means your mind has gone blank.

Or if somebody asks you a question, you know: “Can…?” Like, you know: “What’s…? What’s your phone number?” Maybe if you’re, like, forgetful, you don’t remember. “Oh, my mind just went blank. I don’t remember. I need to, you know, memorize it.” Okay? So when your mind goes blank it’s usually because you’re nervous or tired and you forget everything. Okay? And then maybe you remember in a minute, but at that moment you don’t remember anything.

Okay, so: “My mind just went blank.” My mind always goes blank. Okay, the final example of these brain expressions with “mind” is: “Make up someone’s mind.” So, when somebody makes up their mind it means they decide something, they decide to do something. Okay? So I can say: “I have made up my mind. I’m going to university.” It means I’ve decided to go to university. We could say: “Philip made up his mind. He’s going to get pizza for dinner tonight.” Or: “Susan made up her mind. She’s going to the prom with Johnny.” Just another example. So, when you make up your mind, you decide to do something.

“I’ve made up my mind. I’m going to be an astronaut.” Another example, okay, of deciding to do something. So now let’s look at some expressions that have to do with “mind” when we’re talking about being polite and politeness. Okay, so we can also use the word “mind” when we are trying to be polite. And usually we use it this way if we are asking permission for something or if we are requesting something. Pretty much we are asking: Is something okay? And this is a very polite way to ask that. So, for example: “Do you mind if _______?”, “Do you mind if I smoke?” So this is a question where you’re politely asking: “Is it okay if I smoke?” Okay? So, we don’t usually… Well, we sometimes talk this way to our friends, but we usually use this in formal situations or with strangers, or with people we don’t really know that well.

But we can also use it with friends, too. “Do you mind if I smoke?” So you’re asking permission. “Is it okay if I smoke?”, “Do you mind if I open the window?”, “Do you mind if I turn off the light?”, “Do you mind if I borrow your books?” Okay? So, again, you’re asking permission. Now, if it’s okay, you can say: “I don’t mind.” This means: “It’s okay”. “I don’t mind if you open the window.”, “I don’t mind if you smoke.”, “I don’t mind if you borrow my books.” You’re saying: “It’s okay if you do this.” You don’t even need this. If you want, you can say: “Sure. I don’t mind.” So, you know, you don’t need the full sentence, you can just say: “I don’t mind”, and that’s okay, too.

What about if you do mind? What about if it’s not okay? If somebody says: “Do you mind if I smoke?” and you’re not okay with it, what you can say is: “I prefer if you didn’t”. -“Do you mind if I open the window?” -“Well, I’d prefer if you didn’t.” Okay? So we say: “I don’t mind” if it’s okay, and we can say it in different ways, but one way is if you have a problem you can say: “I’d prefer it if you didn’t.” Okay, and then we also have another expression which means very similar: “Would you mind _______?” So this is a very polite way to speak, just like: “Do you mind?”, “Would you mind getting me some coffee?” So in this case I’m asking somebody to do something for me, so I’m requesting something. I want somebody to do something for me and I’m asking: “Is it okay? Is it okay for you…? Do you mind if you get me some coffee?”, “Would you mind getting me some coffee?” I’m requesting for the person to do something for me. “Would you mind if I don’t go to the party?”, “Is it okay if I don’t go to the party? Would you mind?” So this, again, is very similar to: “Do you mind?” It’s a polite way to either request something or ask for somebody’s permission to see if something is okay.

So these are all very polite ways to speak. So we’ve now covered “mind” when we’re talking about the brain and thinking, we’ve covered “mind” when we’re talking about being polite and requesting or asking permission for something. And now let’s look at the final way we use “mind”, which is when we’re telling somebody to pay attention to something. Okay, so our next expression has to do with paying attention. It means you’re telling somebody to be careful about some sort of danger, and so that sentence is: “Mind the _______!” and then here you put whatever the danger is.

So, for example: “Mind the gap.” If you’ve ever been on the subway or the tube and you see there’s, like, between the train and the platform, there’s like a hole, sometimes people might trip on that so you’ll see signs saying: “Mind the gap”, which means: “Be careful about the gap. Pay attention for this gap.” Or on a rainy day when it rains, the ground has puddles on it. So, a puddle is like a lot of water, and what you might tell your friend is: “Oh wait, mind the puddle”, meaning: “Pay attention.

There’s a puddle there.” Or maybe you see dog poo on the sidewalk, and you’re about to step in it and your friend says: “Mind the dog shit.” Okay? Or: “Mind the dog poo”, if you want to be more polite. So, you know, you see these different dangers. Sometimes they’re not dangers, but you really don’t want to step in dog doo-doo, so that’s an example. So anytime you’re telling somebody: “Be careful. Pay attention to this” and it’s kind of urgent, you can use: “Mind the _______.” We also have: “Keep in mind”. So, “keep in mind” means you’re telling somebody to pay attention to something and not forget to remember something. Okay? So, for example: “Keep in mind the bus leaves at 8 pm.” This means: “Remember”, or, you know: “Keep this on your mind. Don’t forget this. Pay special attention to this, the bus leaves at 8 pm.” Or imagine your boss is going on vacation and you’re not going to be able to contact them, your boss might tell you: “Keep in mind I’m going on vacation on Tuesday.” Okay? So: “Keep in mind” means: “Please remember this.” You’re pretty much reminding somebody about something, you’re telling them to put…

Or to pay attention to it, to put some sort of focus on it, and to remember it. Okay? So we’ve covered a lot of different expressions, and just to tell you this, when we cover a lot of expressions it’s very easy to forget some of the ones we cover because we have covered many. What I recommend is maybe working on three or four a day, and then just come back to the video, watch again, learn some new expressions, practice those ones, and once you’re comfortable with those ones maybe work on some of the other expressions we’ve covered in this video. You don’t have to learn them all at the same time; you can do a little bit every day, and that way you will remember a lot more.

On that note, I invite you to come check out our website at www.engvid.com and there you can actually find a quiz where we have all of these expressions and you can practice using them in our quiz. So I highly recommend that for practice. Another point is I’d like you to invite you to subscribe to our channel. There, you will find a lot of incredible videos on all sorts of things. We have more vocabulary videos, grammar, pronunciation, IELTS, TOEFL, business English, all sorts of different resources that are very helpful for students. So I highly recommend you check that out. Until next time, take care. And I will see you later..

As found on Youtube

How to learn grammar – any grammar!!!

Hello. Do you have to learn grammar? I have to learn grammar sometimes. I’m a grammar teacher. And I know grammar is really, really difficult sometimes. And it just makes you want to scream, pull your hair out, freak out, and cry sometimes. “I hate grammar.” The reason why grammar is so difficult is because it’s confusing; you have to remember so many rules; and then, there are exceptions to these so many rules; and it’s just really confusing; and it’s very different from your native language or languages, depending on how many you speak.

So really, really easy, really effective method to learn any grammar ever in the world. So today’s lesson is how to learn, remember, and use any grammar that is on a test, whether you’re taking TOEFL or TOEIC or IELTS or Cambridge — anything that you have to remember grammar for, this is going to be a godsend for you. It’s going to help you so much. Great. So let’s get into it. First one, you have two points to remember. That’s it. Two. Done. The first one is the structure. You have to remember and know how the grammar is made. Okay? The second point is how or why do we use this? Why do I need to learn this stupid grammar? Am I ever going to use it in real life? Why would I say this? Why do I need present perfect? Why can’t I just use simple past? Why do I need continuous? Why do I need passive? These are the questions you have to ask two people, one, your teacher, and two, yourself.

If you are teaching English and you don’t know structure, and more importantly, how and why, you’ve got some homework to do. People — students have asked me, “Teacher, why?” “I don’t know.” Just say to them, “I don’t know.” Go look it up. Do some research. Find the answer. The best thing is to find your own answer if you have to do this. So let’s dive into this. First of all, when I say “structure”, I mean how do you make the grammar? How do you make the sentence? So if I give you the example of present continuous, this is the name of the grammar. If you just remember the name of the grammar, it’s useless.

So it comes to the test and it says, “Write a present continuous sentence.” He’s like, “Uh, I know present continuous. How do you make it?” So the way that I always remember grammar is I always like to use a subject. Now, if you want to replace the word “subject” with any other word like [random sounds] or “dog”, that’s cool. But I like to use “subject” as my beginning. Then, for present continuous, it’s going to be “to be verb”. But instead of just writing “to be verb”, it really, really helps you if you write out the different forms of the “to be” verb. So for example, “I am”, “he is”, “we are”. Okay? The second thing — sorry. The last thing in the present continuous that makes the verb continuous is you’re going to have the -ing. So the structure or the form that I like to use for the present continuous is subject + “am”, “is”, “are” + verb + ing. The present continuous also has another name, which is “present progressive”. They’re exactly the same grammar point. The usages are the same. But it’s just a different word for it.

Don’t worry. It’s cool. Don’t worry about it. So next step — we’ve got the structure. Next step, very important, how or why do I use this? Why do I need to use this grammar? Why do I need to learn this grammar? You need to learn it because it’s on your test. But as soon as the test is finished, why would I use this? How would I say this in my life? Answer — actions you are doing now. What are you doing right now? Are you watching a video? I think you are. So maybe you’re watching a video. Maybe you’re eating something. Maybe you’re brushing your teeth. I can’t see you. You can see me. What are you doing? Ah. Okay. Good. So present continuous, as an example, structure, how and why. Another really, really good thing to do is to write down as many examples as you can. It’s always good to practice the grammar written. Also, talk. Speak. Get a video recorder and talk into it — or tape recorder, digital recorder. Listen to yourself saying the new grammar sentences. It will help you remember if you play it back.

Let’s use this theory. Let’s learn some new grammar. Maybe it’s old grammar. It’s okay. Past simple, so first of all, structure. How do I make past simple? Do you know? Do you know? Okay. Past simple is going to be subject + a past tense of the verb, and usually, we’re going to have a noun or a complement to the verb. So you have subject + past tense + noun. For example, “I ate dinner.” Yay. Okay. Uh-oh. So what — hold on. So I’ve remembered the structure, but I need to know why would I use this? Why is this useful in my life? How or why? How do we use this? We use this to talk about past — I’m going to say “boring”. Some people like to say “routine”. But it’s basically for past events. And usually, we have a time marker in this. We don’t have to have a time marker as a rule, but usually, we throw in a time marker just to help us distinguish it from present perfect. So rule No.

1, structure. How do you make the grammar? No. 2, how and why do I use this? Why do I use this? This is how you’re going to connect this for your brain. Step 3, I didn’t write it down, but that’s okay. Think of, write down, talk about as many examples as you can. But very importantly, make the examples relevant to you, to your life. Don’t think about examples about someone else that you don’t know or things that you don’t care about. Try and make them for you. This will help you remember why the grammar is important. What are you doing right now? What did you do yesterday? So simple past. “I ate dinner. I went for a walk. It was really cold. It was so cold. But I did it.” Right now, I’m teaching you. I’m breathing. Are you breathing? I hope you’re breathing. I’m watching you.

You’re watching me. It’s fantastic. So the next time you’re in grammar class or you’re trying learn grammar by yourself — it doesn’t matter what language it is — always think of these two very easy steps. One, structure; two, how and why. I guarantee you that this will help you so much. I guarantee it so much that you will get your money back from somewhere if it doesn’t work. Call this 1-800 number. Give it a chance. Bye..

As found on Youtube