Intonation in Long Sentences – English Pronunciation with JenniferESL

{“en”:”In this lesson, we’ll focus on intonation patterns within longer sentences. Like the one I just said about boots. [title] My model sentences are getting longer now, so I’m using thought groups or intonation groups. Remember what those are? Sometimes our sentences begin with a longer thought. It could be a phrase or a whole clause (with a subject and a verb). We can use low-rise intonation to signal that we’re not done yet.

There’s more information that we’d like to add. There’s more than one intonation pattern we can use in longer sentences. – Either in that first thought group or a middle thought group. So I’ll share a second. It involves dropping our voice and then rising again. Some call it a fall-rise intonation pattern. We can use this fall-rise in many of the same places as the low-rise. You try. Let’s practice the fall-rise intonation pattern. Repeat after me. So what’s the difference between the low-rise and and the fall-rise? I don’t believe there’s a significant difference. Both patterns end with a rise, and that signals incompletion. You’re not done with your thought.

There’s more coming. Here’s where I think there could be a difference. Stating lists. Listen and compare. I have one pair of sneakers, a few pairs of boots, two pairs of sandals, and…several pairs of dress shoes. I have one pair of sneakers, a few pairs of boots, two pairs of sandals, and several pairs of dress shoes. When I used low-rise intonation the first time, I needed time to think. My statement sounded more hesitant, less certain. The second time I used fall-rise intonation. It sounded more certain. Perhaps even more authoritative. See if you can understand the difference when I count. First, I’ll use a low-rise.

1…2…3…4…5. Now I’ll try a fall-rise. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. Sounds more certain. I can make it even more certain and perhaps authoritative if I use that “angry parent” voice. 1, 2, 3, 4… Do you see how the meaning…and the expression changes? We can even put these two intonation patterns together in the same sentence. I did this at the beginning of the video when I said, …and then I add on. We might also use a fall-rise when we need to pause because we’re hesitating to add on. To finish our thought. We know what we’re going to say, but perhaps what we’re going to say is surprising or disappointing in some way. You’ll hear statements like, You could try, but it may not work. They’re good, but expensive. Let’s put everything together. We’ll read a short text. I’ll mark the thought groups, show the focus words, and also show where we rise and fall. If you want, I’ll tell you where I got these leather boots. Do you want to know? I got them in Texas. That’s all for now. Thanks for watching and happy studies.. “}

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Hypnotherapy in Brighton

Learn English Expressions: JUST IN CASE

{“en”:”Hello. My name is Emma and in today’s video I am going to teach you about a very important piece of vocabulary — it’s also very important when it comes to grammar — and that is the expression: “Just in case” or we can also say: “in case”. So, we use this a lot in English, so it’s very… It’s something very important for you to learn. So let’s talk about what it means and how we use it.

So, we use: “in case” or “just in case”-we use both-when we are talking about doing something to prevent a problem. Okay? So we’re talking about… Or doing something to prepare for a problem. So, we’re looking at a problem and we’re looking at preparation or prevention of that problem. Okay? So, for example: “Tonight, I am going to a restaurant.” I’m very excited. Now, the problem is I get cold very easily, and when I’m cold I’m not a very nice person; I get very cranky, and I’m not a good person to be with when I’m cold. So my problem is I get cold easily. What is my prevention or preparation for this problem? Well: “I will bring a sweater just in case I get cold.” Okay? And that way I will have a great time at the restaurant, hopefully. So my problem is being cold, and my preparation is I’m going to bring a sweater.

So, as you can see, if you think about life, we have a lot of these types of problems and we do a lot of things to prepare for these types of problems. So let’s look at some other examples. Okay, a problem is when it rains… Okay? A lot of the times when it rains, you know, I don’t like getting wet, so what do I do? Well, my preparation or prevention is I bring an umbrella, or maybe I’ll bring a rain jacket.

Okay? So: “I will bring an umbrella just in case it rains.” Another problem is if you work at 9am, you know, a lot of the times there’s a lot of cars; everybody’s going to work at the same time, there’s a lot of traffic. And if there’s a lot of traffic maybe you’ll be late for work. So what will you do for this problem? So, traffic is the problem or maybe going to work late is the problem, but what you can do to prevent or prepare for this problem is you can leave your house early.

So: “I leave my house early every day just in case there’s traffic.” Another example of a problem is maybe you’re going to visit your friend, and your friend gives you their address. Now, if you don’t write down their address, you’re going to be lost. I don’t know where they live. I need to go to my friends’ house, I forget their address; I don’t know where they live. So this is the problem. Especially if you’re very forgetful like me or you always forget people’s phone numbers or, you know, where people live, this is a big problem.

So what do you do to prevent this problem? Well, you write down their address. Okay? On a piece of paper, your friend tells you their address, you write it down. Why do you write it down? “You write down their address just in case you forget it.” Okay? You forget their address. So I’ve just given you some examples of where we would use “just in case”. There are a lot of examples for “just in case”. I want you to think about your life.

Is there something that happens every day to you, maybe you have some sort of problem or something you worry about? So think about that for a second. Is there something you worry about every day, and what do you do to prepare for that or to prevent a problem from happening? Okay? Maybe, you know, you’re worried about failing your test, so you might create a study group just in case. Okay? Or maybe, you know, your teacher gives you homework. Maybe you will do the homework just in case they want to see it. So, you see what I’m saying? There’s a lot of problems you might have, and a lot of preventions or preparations you do for those problems.

So try to think of one in your own life. Okay, so now we are going to look at the grammar of “just in case” or “in case”. Okay, so we’ve already looked at what are problems, and how we prepare or prevent problems. Now let’s look at some examples of: How do we create this sentence in a grammatical fashion? So, I have here the sentence: “I will bring an umbrella in case it rains.” Do you remember what the problem is? The problem is it rains, and the preparation is bringing an umbrella.

I have another sentence. “I will leave my house early in case there is traffic.” So, again, traffic is the problem, and leaving my house early is the preparation or the prevention of a problem. So, I have a couple of questions for you about the grammar. Okay? I want you to look at the sentences, both of these sentences: Is the problem…? So the problem we’re talking about, do you see the problem before or after the expression “in case”? So where is the problem? So we find “in case”.

Is the problem before “in case”, up here; or is the problem after “in case”? It’s after, right? So, “it rains” is the problem, so: “in case it rains”, these go together. What about down here? “…in case”, is the problem before the word “in case” or is it after the word “in case”? Well, the problem is traffic, so the problem comes after the word “in case”. Okay? So if it helps you to remember: “in case”… So we wouldn’t write this in a sentence. This is… We won’t put these brackets in a sentence, but just to help you in your head to remember: “in case” is with the problem, so these are like one unit, if that makes sense. Okay. And so if the problem comes after “in case”, what comes before “in case”? The preparation or the prevention. So after “in case” is the problem, before is the prevention or the preparation. Okay, so what verb tense comes after “in case”? So when we’re talking about the problem, what is the verb tense that we use when we’re talking about the problem? So I want you to look, here’s the verb and here is the other verb.

Is this the past, the present, or the future? If you said the present, you are correct. We use the present tense when we use “in case”. Okay? And so: “in case it rains”, we could put this… You know, imagine if I said: “I will bring a sweater in case it gets cold”, so the part after “in case” is always in the present tense. Okay. So another question you might be wondering: “Do ‘in case’ and ‘just in case’ mean the same thing? Can I use either, ‘in case’ or ‘just in case?'” “I will bring an umbrella just in case it rains” or “in case it rains”, they’re both correct. It’s your choice; you can use whichever one you prefer.

Okay, and these two sentences use the word “will”: “I will leave my house early”, “I will bring an umbrella”, so this is talking about, you know, doing something in the future, right? “In the future I will bring an umbrella”, or “In the future I will leave my house early”. Do we always use “will” when we use…? When we’re making these types of sentences? Can I say: “I always bring an umbrella in case it rains” or “I brought an umbrella in case it rains”? Can I use the past, present, or future, or is it always the future? Actually for “just in case”, you can use “will”, you can use the past tense, or you can use the present tense when you’re talking about the preparation. So the problem… We’re talking about a future problem, this stays in the present tense; but in terms of the preparation, it depends on when you do the preparation. So the key question here is: When did you prepare, or when did you prevent the problem? So I’ll give you some examples. Imagine for this one: Yesterday I brought an umbrella to work because today I knew it would rain.

So if in the past, if yesterday or earlier today, you know, I brought an umbrella, we could change this to: “brought”. “I brought an umbrella in case it rains”. “…in case it rains” stays the same. Okay? It’s always in the present. But before the preparation we can use the past. Or what about if, you know… For example, the second sentence, imagine I always leave my house early, every day. Okay? I always do it. It’s a routine. “I will leave my house early in case there’s traffic.” If it’s a routine and it always happens, I can use the present tense here, I can say: “I always leave my house early in case there is traffic.” Okay? Or if we’re talking about something I’ll do in the future to prepare: “I will leave my house early in case there is traffic.” So, bottom line, the key point here, the thing that you really got to remember: After “in case” this is always the present.

Okay? So, after the words “in case”, the verb is the present; but when you’re talking about what you’re doing, the preparation, it depends on when you prepare. If you’re preparing… If the action of preparing is in the past, you use the past; if it’s a routine that you always do, you use the present; or if it’s something you’re going to do, use the future. Okay? So let me think if I can give you another example. Okay, if we think about a test and studying, I can say: “I studied hard for my test yesterday in case my test is hard.” Or, sorry: I studied…

Yeah. “I really studied for my test yesterday in case the test is hard”, so we have it in the past, I studied in the past. Now if, you know, maybe I always study for a test and I always really study hard for a test, I can say it in the present: “I always study for a test in case it’s hard.” Or, you know, maybe I’ve never done that before, but maybe tomorrow I’m going to study, I can say: “I will study, you know, for my test in case it’s hard.” Okay? So it depends on when you’re doing that action. All right, so we’re going to look at a couple more examples, you know, to get you more practice and more familiar with “in case” and “just in case”. Okay, so in my life I get hungry a lot. And just like when I get cold I’m not really a happy person, when I get hungry I’m not a happy person.

So in order to make sure I stay happy, I always try to have food with me. So, for example, I’ve made a sentence with “just in case” or “in case”: “I brought a sandwich today in case I get hungry.” So what’s the problem here? The problem is when Emma’s hungry she’s a horrible person to be around. Okay? So, we have a problem: Emma’s hungry. So, what do we do to make sure Emma, you know, stays like a happy person? Well, we make sure she takes a sandwich with her, so that’s the preparation. Okay? And, again, after “in case” we have the problem, before we have the preparation. Okay, and this, again, is in the present tense. And this one is in the past tense because I already brought the sandwich. Okay? This is something I did this morning. Now, it is possible to change the structure of the sentence around.

You don’t have to, so if you think: “Wow, Emma, today I learned a lot, I don’t want to, you know, learn anymore”, that’s okay, you’ve learned a lot. But if you’re interested, we can also change the sentence and put it in the opposite way. So what do I mean by that? Well, in this case “in case” is the second part of the sentence; we can also put it as the first part of the sentence. “In case I get hungry,”-so it’s the exact same words, we just add a comma-“I brought a sandwich”. So it’s your choice, they have the exact same meaning. You can start with “In case” or “in case” can be in the middle of the sentence. But when you start with “In case”, just make sure you remember the comma. Up here there’s no comma. Okay? So, for a lot of people this is easier because they, you know, forget their commas, but we do use both. Okay, let’s look at another example. “I always keep medicine at home in case I _______ sick.” Okay? So if you think about it, a lot of people will have medicine for headaches, or for when they catch a cold, they keep medicine at home.

So what’s the problem here? The problem is getting sick. Okay? So, the problem is getting sick, and how do we prepare for that? Well, we have medicine at home. So, after “in case” I want to use the verb “get” here. What do I need to do to the verb “get”? Is it going to be in the past tense as in “got”, do I say “get”, or “will get”? What tense do I use? If you said “get”, which is the present tense, you are correct. Yay. Good for you. I hope you got that. “I always keep medicine at home in case I get sick.” And, again, this is in the present because it’s something we do as a routine, we’re always doing this. Okay, so the last example: “I’ll go early just in case there is a line.” So imagine you’re going to the movie theatre, and you know a lot of the times with movie theatres there’s a long line up -that’s a problem.

A long line up is a problem, so what do you do to prevent that problem or to prepare for it? Well, you go to the movie theatre early so you can line up and make sure you get a good seat. So, in this case I’ve used the word “just in case”. “I’ll go early to the movie theatre just in case there is a long line.” Do I need to use, like, all of this? Can I just say: “I’ll go early just in case”, and not even say this? That’s possible. So if you don’t even want to do this, you can actually just say: “I’ll go early just in case” as long as the person you’re talking to knows, like, the context and can understand what you’re talking about, and it’s obvious, you know, what you’re doing, you can just use “just in case” instead of the full sentence.

Okay? So, even up here: “I always keep medicine at home”, you probably keep medicine at home in order… Like, in case you get sick, it’s kind of obvious, so if you wanted to, you can just say: “…just in case”. Okay? So there’s a couple of ways we can use “just in case”. You’ve learned a couple of different ways today. You will hear all of these different variations in conversation, in movies, on TV. Again, “just in case” and “in case” is very common and very important; we use it a lot.

So you might hear any of these variations of it. So, I hope you have enjoyed this lesson. And just in case you want to practice more, you can come visit our website at www.engvid.com, and there you can do our quiz. Now, in case, you know, maybe you didn’t understand the video, like, completely or maybe there’s some confusion, in case you’re confused, watch the video again.

Okay? You can get a lot from watching these videos multiple times. I also want to invite you to come subscribe to our channel; there you can find lots of other videos on things like pronunciation, vocabulary, writing, IELTS. You know, we have so many different types of videos and, you know, on a lot of useful things like grammar and, you know, all sorts of different types of topics. So I really recommend you check that out. Until next time, thanks for watching and take care.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in Brighton

How to Stop Translating in Your Head and Start Thinking in English Like a Native

{“en”:”Hey, Naturals. What’s up? It’s your favorite American English teacher Gabby here with a Go Natural English lesson to help you to stop Translating everything from English into your native language in your head in your mind and your brain in your noggin and to start thinking only in English it is Possible believe me no matter what level you’re at right now It’s possible to think in English And I’m gonna show you how I’m gonna give you 9 Tips that will help you on your journey to thinking just like a native English speaker So if this is interesting to you, then keep watching So first of all, what’s the problem with translating everything Into your native language before you come up with a response in English. Well if you’re in a Conversation or some situation where you need to really process information quickly and be able to respond rapidly in an appropriate timely manner Then you really don’t have time to translate Even if you’re super smart which I know you are and you’re really good at English.

Which I know you are it still takes time to process all the information you’re getting in English into your native language and then Think in your native language, okay, what am I gonna say how am I gonna respond and then translate that Back into English it’s a lot of work for your brain to do and no matter how Awesomely intelligent you are it’s gonna take too long in a native speed kind of fast back and forth conversation so if you are in a social situation if you’re in a meeting at work if you are at a Presentation and you want to ask questions You really need to be able to think in English So the problem started with the way that we learn Foreign languages this happened to me when I was learning Spanish in the classroom How did we learn we learn through translating with Spanish I learned that one is Uno and two is dos and Let’s see coffee is Cafe and So on so of course it’s easy, and it makes sense to begin this way because we know vocabulary in our native language but it actually is hurting us once we get into Conversational English or in my case conversational Spanish, so when I left the classroom When I left my English sorry my Spanish classroom And I tried to have a conversation with native Spanish speakers I was like in total shock my jaw hit the ground because I Couldn’t understand anything and I definitely couldn’t respond because I was trying to just Identify a few words that I could recognize that I could hear that I could listen to that I could comprehend and then Translate those into English and then think in English to translate back into Spanish And I was a wreck so I don’t want that to happen to you Maybe you know how that feels already let me give you some suggestions to get you started thinking in English first let’s start small Understanding everything in English and being able to respond in English is like a big meal.

That’s a lot of vocabulary or a lot of food to digest right so let’s start by taking small bites and digest thoroughly so start by doing small daily activities in English so for example Every day, I take my dog for a walk or sometimes we go for a run so sometimes I talk to him usually in English, but sometimes just to really confuse him I talked to him in Spanish and instead of saying come let’s go I’ll say ven, vamonos right so you could do this in English Maybe if you have a pet or if you don’t have a pet there’s other ways, too I bet you have a phone if you have a smart phone you could set that in English so that every time you open up your phone there’s English vocabulary For you to work with this is an example of an everyday Activity probably multiple times a day you’re looking at your phone that you could do in English And maybe there’s other things that you can think of too So what are some other suggestions of small daily activities that you could do in English? Comment let me know what you think Okay, next listen to more English this doesn’t even have to take up more of your time You can give yourself an immersive experience in English no matter where you are Open up your laptop or your smartphone and download Some podcasts in English or listen to internet radio or put on a video on YouTube or on Netflix in English and play it in the background while you’re doing other work that doesn’t require intense focus I love doing this when I’m just doing housework or like organizing stuff around my room or my office or whatever I will listen to music and other languages because I love learning the lyrics to songs in Spanish or in Portuguese or in other languages that I want to learn so most recently I was Listening in Spanish to the song called Lloraras Which is a famous salsa song I highly recommend it if you’d like to get into Salsa But anyway, let me continue with tips for thinking in English 3 try Guessing or Planning what native English speakers are going to say in that next Conversation or in that presentation or whatever situation that you’re going to be in in English so when you predict based on your life experience what you think people are going to say You will be more prepared and more confident You’re preparing your brain to receive that information And you’d be surprised probably like eight out of ten times You’re going to be correct now.

Don’t get too attached To your prediction because of course other people don’t know that script that’s going on in your head So be prepared for something different to come out of people’s mouths but just by exploring the different options or your Prediction or guess of what you think will happen you’re gonna feel way more Confident, and you’re gonna be able to process that information Faster and to think in English yourself because you’re already thinking when you predict what’s going to happen in a conversation four stop learning exclusively through translation Especially once you’re out of your beginner English class we have to learn through association through Experience through observing watching listening through touching through your life experience you have to Associate the word with the meaning and not the English word with your native language word Okay, words are just where they’re just letters, okay? The real true meaning is what you understand and then you can attach that to the word okay? So book is not necessarily livro in in Spanish or Portuguese It’s a thing with pieces of paper and writing that I can read and learn from so I hope this is making sense But you have to stop learning exclusively through Translation and next very closely related number five is to stop using a bilingual dictionary the best use of your bilingual dictionary where there’s English and then your native language is actually as like a Coaster where you put your coffee cup on On top of your table, so it doesn’t leave a circle on your table That’s the best use for it because if you continue to use this bilingual dictionary to learn vocabulary In English you’re always going to be practicing translation so just use that thing as a coaster or whatever and use a monolingual dictionary instead monolingual means one language so English to English and you’re going to exponentially expand your English language vocabulary when you do this next number six label objects in your environment in English you can just do this in your head It’s super simple super fast and easy doesn’t cost anything or you could actually write the words on paper and tape Those labels right to the objects or use sticky notes or something and for example if I see a book and I’m learning Spanish Then I would write on my sticky note libro And I think I said Livro before, but that’s actually portuguese I get confused between Spanish and portuguese I will tell you honestly it is not always easy to learn both at the same time so anyway Libro is booked if I’m learning Spanish Maybe livro if I’m learning Portuguese hey if I’m learning Arabic It’s kitab you can help me with my pronunciation in the comments, but put a label on everyday objects This is really especially helpful for beginners intermediate Level English learners, but it can be fun to do just to remind yourself to think in English at any level Number 7.

Talk to yourself in English when you talk to yourself out loud It does so many good things for you Not only are you going to practice your pronunciation your speaking your vocabulary your fluency But you are developing that thinking and English skill so what kind of things should you say when you’re talking to yourself out loud in English and When should you do this well first of all I would suggest doing this perhaps in the privacy of your own home Maybe not around your co-workers or people that might think you’ve gone crazy So what do you tell yourself? Well, you could ask yourself questions for example right now I’m thinking what am I going to eat for lunch today? So if I am trying to improve my Portuguese I might think to myself and say out loud “O que vou comer hoje no almorco?” Yeah, think that’s right.

If it’s not you can tell me in the comments but it’s okay if you make a mistake talking out loud to yourself if your grammars not perfect if your pronunciation is not perfect it’s okay because the point is not to be perfect the point is for you to develop that habit of Thinking and speaking the language so it’s totally okay Just make a mental note of what you’re not sure about if you are not sure if you’re supposed to use like the article the or whatever it is you’re not sure about and then you could ask someone just like I asked you in the Comments, you could ask your native speaker friend your teacher or do some research online Another way, I really love to talk to myself out loud in languages I’m learning is to sing a song so I mentioned earlier that I was Listening to a song called Lloraras, which means you will cry it’s kind of a sad song actually, but I love to actually sing that song when I’m Just you know doing house chores or walking my dog I’ll just be like yeah se que tu no quieres que yo a ti te quiera So I’m not a great singer so I’m gonna stop but just to give you an example That is what I love doing and I might even mix in some Salsa dance moves.

Well, I’m singing eight just start thinking in English with a Mantra or a motto or some phrase that just gets you started like on autopilot Automatically so my phrase might be I am improving my English every day And I would say that in English out loud to myself or just think it okay if I’m learning Portuguese I might say to myself Bom dia, a cada dia estou melhorando meu portugues. Yes, okay like with Emotion is really important really really important even if I look crazy It doesn’t matter it does help you and it lifts your spirits, and it gives you energy to improve your language skills finally number nine Our last tip to help you think in English is to just do a little bit each day So don’t force yourself to think in English all day every day from the get-go or from the beginning just start with 30 seconds, I’m sure that you can think in English for 30 seconds.

You could set an alarm Maybe every day at 9 a.m.. You’re going to think in English for 30 seconds So you know on your phone put an alarm for 9 a.m. And you can title it think in English And then set your timer for 30 seconds and just think in English no matter How simple or how silly it is You can just say hello to yourself over and over and over for 30 seconds. If that’s the best you can do I know you can do better. I know But it’s just an example that it doesn’t matter how complicated your English is when you train to think in English What does matter is that you Start and that you are consistent. So do a little bit every day And you’re going to be thinking in English all day long in no time if you loved these suggestions Let me know in the comments share this video with Your friends who are learning English or maybe your friends who are learning other languages because these tips totally apply to any language you are learning Thank you so much for watching be sure to subscribe to Go Natural English here on YouTube visit the website at GoNaturalEnglish.com and Thank you mwah.

Love you guys. I’ll see you again soon. Bye for now. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Learn English Conversation | How to Talk to Native Speakers

{“en”:”Hey guys, howu2019s it going today? My name is Brandon. And in this video, weu2019re going to help you improve your English speaking ability. When you first meet somebody, you might want to ask them a million questions. But, actually, you want to keep a balance of giving and asking questions. And in this video, weu2019re going to show you how. So keep watching. Whenever, Iu2019m traveling abroad, Iu2019m always wanting to meet new people, have good conversations, and just have a good time. But, generally, all the conversations are almost the same. They always ask the same questions. Where are you from? What do you do? Why are you here? Where do you live? How old are you? And so on and so on. Those arenu2019t bad questions. But it just feels like Iu2019m being interviewed. And I donu2019t want to be interviewed. I want to talk to you. I want to learn a little bit about you. So if you ask me whatu2019s my favorite sports team, After tell me yours, and tell me why.

The key is keeping a balance. Between asking and giving information. Balance is key. So the next time you see me walking down the street, or any other foreigner, go up and say, u201chiu201d. Start a conversation. Ask them some questions. But donu2019t ask them one million questions. You want to start a conversation. And a conversation is sharing information between two or more people. So make sure you give them some information about yourself, too. If you like this video, make sure you like and subscribe.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Improve your English the CRAZY way!!!

{“en”:”Hi, there. Are you having problems or difficulties, or do you find it difficult to practice speaking English? Maybe you live in a country where nobody around you speaks English, or you’re the only person you know that speaks English. I’ve got some advice for you. So, how to help you improve your speaking or your talking in English. Goin’ crazy. Usually in English, we never say: “going” or “trying”. We say: “goin'”. So, any time in English you see this, we’re actually missing the “g”. So, probably you should say: “Going crazy trying to speak or practice English”.

But, in slang when regular speech, we say: “Goin’ crazy tryin’ to speak or practice English”. So, I want you to think about one thing. Crazy people, there’s one right here. I’m crazy, little bit. But when I say “crazy people”, I mean people who are mentally disturbed or have something really wrong with their brain. And we like to categorize people as being crazy, but they really are not insane. They just make crazy noises. So if someone is considered crazy, what do they do? Crazy people usually talk to themselves, they hear voices, especially if they’re psychotic, and they will take to anyone or everyone that will listen to them. So, my advice to you, secret number 42 of how to speak English, is act like you’re crazy, or just go crazy learning English.

The first one: crazy people talk to themselves. You are going to talk to yourself. If you want to really put… Bring this off and do it well, you could go on the bus [giggles] or on any kind of trans… Public transportation, go on the street in your city and just talk to yourself on the street. I don’t really recommend that. If you want to do that, you can. But talk to yourself, but record it. So when you do this, you’re actually listening to your English so you can catch your mistakes and you can listen to your pronunciation. And, really, what do you sound like in English? So, rule number one: you’re going to talk to yourself, but you’re going to record it so you can check your mistakes and you can see just how well you do speak. Because I bet you, you speak better than you think. Next one: crazy people talk about hearing voices. Now, I know you inside have a voice. You, like I, have an inner being, a voice inside your head.

Crazy people are known to have more than one voice. If you have this, you might want to seek some help. But when you hear voices, I want you to talk to yourself inside your head in English. When I lived in Japan, I learned to speak Japanese. I didn’t take a course. I don’t like studying. But my inner voice spoke to me in Japanese. So I would come back to Canada or I would go travelling, and I would actually speak to people who spoke English, they would ask me a question, I would answer them in Japanese because my inner voice was still talking to me in Japanese.

So, one really, really important and great thing that you can do is make your inside voice speak to you in English. This sounds crazy, but I guarantee you that it’s one of the ways that you know if you are coming actually bilingual (means you can speak two languages) or trilingual. So, if your inside voice can talk to you in two different languages, this is really amazing, and it means that your English is improving. Everyone has a different timeline. Some people can do this within a year, some people within months, some people it takes three or four years to do this, but once you have achieved this, woohoo, you’re almost there. And the last one: you’ll notice that if you see crazy people on the subway or you see crazy people in your city, they’re going to talk to any or… This means “or”, by the way. Everyone. They don’t care who it is. They’re not going to be picky and go: “I don’t want to talk to that person. I want to talk to everyone.” So, the more people that you can speak to in English, the better.

You don’t have to be picky. That means you don’t have to choose. Is it a beautiful girl? A handsome boy? Young people, old people, babies, children. Anyone that you know that speaks English, try and talk to them. Even in your country, you think: “Ronnie, there’s no one in my country that speaks English”, you might be surprised. You can find people on websites, and you can find other English speakers to talk to. So, go crazy, speak as much as you can, and learn English with me. I’m Ronnie, and I’m crazy. Good bye.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

My TOP 5 Writing Tips (for all levels)

{“en”:”Hello. My name is Emma, and in today’s video I am going to teach you some great writing tips. These tips are for both academic writing and non-academic writing. Okay? So it’s for writing in general. Now, this video is going to be in two parts, because I have so many tips, so I’m going to give five tips in this video and five tips in the next video. Okay, so let’s get started. So, there are so many different ways… Or so many different types of writing we do in our lives; we write emails, we write essays if we’re a student, we might write a Facebook post, or we might write a resume or a cover letter.

So it’s very important to develop your writing skills because you will be writing throughout your life a lot. So let’s look at my first tip. My first tip is: It’s very important to think about the genre of what you’re writing. “Genre” is a very fancy word that pretty much means type. So, a genre of writing might be an essay, or it might be a cover letter, or an email, or a tweet. These are all different genres, and each one of these has a different expectation on what you should include and how you should write it. So it’s very important, first step is: Know the genre or know the type, and know what is expected of you.

Also important in this is knowing your audience, or thinking about your audience. So, for example, if you write an email, the language you’re going to use and the way you’re going to write will be different if you write an email to your friend versus an email to your boss. So it’s important to think about: “Who are you writing to?” because this is going to help you decide what to write and how to write it.

Same with, you know, if you are on Twitter and you write a tweet, or on Facebook a Facebook post, you know, it’s important to think about your audience. You know, are you writing this post for friends to see, or is this a post your boss might see, or members of the public? You know, and that could be a problem. So it’s important to think about, especially with this and on other social media, too: Audience. Who will see this and what will they think about it, and what are their expectations? You know, some people work for companies where they’re responsible for social media, so it’s important, too, the type of wording they use when they’re writing on Facebook. If you work at a company and you’re writing for your company, it’s going to be different than if you’re writing for your friends. Same with an essay. An essay has a certain structure, you know, it’s supposed to be a certain amount of pages, it has a certain organization to it, and so knowing what’s expected of you when you write an essay will help you because it’s going to be very different than, for example, a Facebook post.

Same with in business, business reports. Understanding the format of a business report is important if this is something you’re going to be writing, and thinking about your audience. Same with executive summaries, which is a type of thing businesspeople write. If you’re not in business you might not ever write one of these, but if you are in business you need to realize that audience is important because professionals are going to be reading this, and these people are busy, so, you know, knowing your audience and knowing what is expected of you is the very first step to good writing. Let’s look at some other tips. Okay, so we’ve talked about genre or the type of writing you’re doing, and part of this is knowing the expectations for how long what you write should be.

Okay? So you want to know a bit about length expectations before you start writing. This is really important, especially in university where you often have a number of pages you’re allowed to write. It’s important, you know, in the workplace because sometimes, you know, you can’t write a lot. And it’s important, you know, on Twitter because you have a certain number of characters you can use. So length is very important because that’s going to help you decide what to include in your writing. Okay, so let’s look at this a bit more.

When I was younger I used to think long, meaning a lot of writing, was always better, but this is not the case. You know, the more you write, maybe you can include more detail, but a lot of the times the person or your audience who’s reading what you write does not have a lot of time, and so they don’t want to read long pieces of work. Okay? So it’s important to know expectations.

So, for example, I have here the word “short” and “long”, and so this is kind of like the scale. If you write a tweet it’s going to be something short; a Facebook post might be a little bit longer; a paragraph, you might write something like five sentences if in school you have to write a paragraph on something; an email might be a little bit longer than this; a cover letter you might use a full page; a resume maybe you might use two pages but nothing more; and then you might write an essay which might be 5 pages, 10 pages, depending; and then maybe a report which might be 50 pages-who knows?-depending on what’s expected.

So my main point here is that different types of writing have different expectations with length, and it’s really important to follow those expectations. For students who are writing the TOEFL or the IELTS, you only can use a certain number of words, so this is very important for you to know and to really think about. How are you going to get your message across using the right amount of words? This is a key word we often talk about in good writing, and that’s “concise”.

So when you are concise, it means you say something with as few words as possible, but still getting the meaning across. So you are communicating your idea, but you’re doing it in a short way, as short as you can while still keeping the idea there. So, in different cultures you have different rules about this. In some cultures longer is better. In English-speaking cultures usually we really want to get to the point, so we want something to be… We want to communicate our idea, but we want it to be in a concise way, so using our words very carefully so we don’t use too many words.

So main point here: Know how long something you’re writing should be, and paying attention to this when you write. All right? Now let’s look at my next tip. Okay, so my third point might be one of the most important points in this lesson, and that is: When you write something, very important to plan or to think about what you will say before you write it. This is something a lot of people don’t do because they’re busy, they feel like they don’t have a lot of time, or you know, they just don’t have any ideas.

And the thing is, though, that this will really help improve your writing. Okay? And it doesn’t matter what you’re writing; planning out an email can be important, just like planning out an essay can be important. So let’s think about some ways we can plan out what we want to write. There are… There are different ways to do this. Some people like to make a plan by brainstorming. So, for example, imagine you were writing a paragraph about cats, so you might have your subject or your key idea here, and then you might think about: “Okay, what’s something about cats? Hmm. They make great pets”, and then you might write some stuff about that. Maybe they’re quiet, so they make a good pet. They’re cheap.

Okay? And so the thing is just getting out your ideas. Okay? And then you can organize your ideas better. Or maybe, you know, you’re thinking: “Okay, cats, they eat food. What kind of food do they eat?” So you can do the same thing with reports. You can think about: “Okay, what’s the main ideas that I need to talk about in this report?” You know, where you just kind of brainstorm in advance. I usually do that when I write reports, and I find it very helpful actually, just to get my ideas down on paper, and then I organize them. So, this is one method. Another thing you can do is you can just write down everything, just like this, with a dash. So, for example, if I was writing about cats in a paragraph, I might just start thinking…

Writing anything I think: “Quiet, cute, Grumpy Cat”, okay? And I might just write down all the ideas I have. Now, of course, you’re probably not writing an essay or a paragraph on cats; you’re probably writing something very different, but the idea is the same. Okay? The idea being it’s important to plan, and these are different, great ways to get out your ideas, and to think about them before you actually write. Sometimes if you’re writing an essay you might think in advance about your thesis or what your…

The main topic and the main argument of your essay is going to be. So, for example, cats are better than dogs. Maybe that’s something I want to argue in an essay. And then I might organize based on ideas, so I might write, you know, my first main idea: “They’re cleaner”, and then I might put some details about that. My second main idea is that they’re great for apartments, and then I might write some examples or some reasons why. So, my main point is all of these can work. Find what’s… What helps you in terms of planning. There’s many different ways to plan what you’re going to write, but the most important thing is to plan and to take some time to think about what you want to say in advance, because it will really help your writing. And it’s very obvious when somebody hasn’t planned what they’re going to write, because everything’s disorganized and it’s hard to follow. Planning makes it easier for the audience to understand you. Now let’s look at another tip for how to write better. Okay, so remember I said that it’s very important to think about the type of writing you’re doing, and your audience or who’s going to read it? One of the reasons why this is important is because depending on the type of writing, you’re going to write either in a formal way or an informal way.

Okay? And I’ll explain why this is important to know and how it affects your writing. So first let’s talk about what that means. Well, when you write something formally, this means that we choose certain words and certain types of sentences, and we write a certain way, and we write this way because our audience or the people who are going to read this are usually people from work so we want to be professional, so we write formally when we’re being professional. We might write this way to strangers or customers.

Okay? If we work somewhere and we need to write an email, we might use this type of language, formal language. And we also use formal language in high school, in university, in college when we’re writing for an assignment or for our homework, or something that our teacher or professor will read. Okay? So we use formal writing mainly in work settings and in academic or school settings. Now, this is different from informal writing. Informal writing is the type of writing you will be doing with your friends, so maybe for example a text message, that’s informal; you might use this type of writing when you’re talking to children or writing something for children; and also on social media, so if you write a tweet or a Facebook post, usually you’ll be using informal language; and also with your family, too, you usually use informal language.

So, I have here some examples of genres or types of writing that you might use the formal version or the informal version. So, under formal we have essays, if you do that at university or high school, it would be formal; a cover letter, if you want to get a job and you have to write a cover letter then this is going to be formal language you use; a report, if you work at a company and you have to write reports, you’ll be using formal language; or emails to customers you’ll be using formal language. And there’s a lot more; this is just some examples. For informal, if you write a postcard to your family you’ll be using informal language; a text message would be informal; an email to your friend you would use informal language; or maybe a birthday card.

Okay? So it’s important to think in advance what kind of language you’re going to use. Okay, so how can we make something formal or informal with our language? There’s a couple of ways to do this. The first thing you need to think about is the words you’re going to use or your vocabulary. So, different words either fit into the formal category or informal category. So, for example, if we were talking about a lot of something and we want to be informal, we might use the word “lots”. So this is an example of an informal word: “lots”; we’d use this with our friends. If we want to be a bit more formal, we’re writing, you know, at the university level, we might use the word “many”; this word is formal, whereas “lots” is more informal. Okay? Or same with if we’re writing an email and at the very end of the email we sign our name, we usually say something like “From”, but we don’t use the word “From”.

We can say “Cheers” if we’re writing an email, we can say, you know: “Cheers. Emma”, this would be informal. Or if, you know, we’re in a business and we need to be more serious and formal, we might say something like: “Regards” or “Kind regards”. Same with different words, like: “Sorry”. “Sorry” is a little bit more informal, whereas the word “apologize” is more formal. So, it’s very important when you’re choosing your words because a lot of words fit either into this category or this category, and some words fit into both. It’s good to know the level of formality for the words you’re using. Now, if you’re having a lot of trouble with this and you’re thinking: “How am I going to know if the word is formal or informal?” There’s a quick tip you can try; it doesn’t always work, but in general, longer words in English are often more formal.

So, the longer words are usually in this category. It’s not always the case, but just if you really don’t know, it’s a good way to guess. And they’re usually… They come from Latin. So, for anyone who’s watching who’s from France, from Spain, or South America, or Italy, or who speaks a Latin-based language, if you have a word that’s similar in your language, it probably is a formal word in English or it’s probably something you can use in a formal setting. Okay? So usually the shorter words are the more informal words. So now let’s look at some other ways we can look at formality; formal versus informal. Okay, so when we’re talking about formal and informal writing, another thing to think about is contractions. So, what’s a contraction? A contraction is a short form of a pronoun, like: “I”, “you”, “he”, “she”, “we”; and usually part of a verb, like: “am”, “would”, “will”. So, the short form is, in this example: “I am” becomes “I’m”. “I’m” is a contraction. Or: “you would” can become “you’d”, and that’s a contraction.

“We will” becomes “we’ll” for short, and that’s a contraction. So, contractions have an apostrophe here, and it’s where some of the parts of this word we just remove and so it becomes “will”. So, these contractions, and there’s many in English, we use them in informal writing. So if you’re texting someone, if you’re writing an email to a friend – this will make you sound more informal. Now, compare this to if you’re writing an essay or a thesis at university, or you’re writing a report – we don’t want to use contractions because these are informal. So, if we’re writing something formal, we would use something more like this; we do not use contractions for formal writing. Okay? So that’s another reason why we need to know what we’re writing in advance, because we want to decide if we’ll use contractions or not. My next point is about sentence types and sentence lengths. When we’re talking about formal versus informal, you’ll find things that are usually informal are short.

We usually use shorter sentences. And in formal writing, you’ll find sentences tends to be longer. Okay? So, we can call this… For informal we can talk about simple sentences, for example, a simple sentence: “Students are stressed.” It’s a short sentence that if you know about clauses, it only has one clause; if you don’t know about clauses, don’t worry. The point is it’s shorter. Now, compare this to something more complex. “When a student begins university, they often report feeling stressed.” This is more of a complex sentence, it’s longer, and you’ll notice there’s a comma in the middle of it breaking it up into two clauses; and again, if you don’t understand clauses, that’s okay. The main point here is this, complex or longer is usually in formal writing, whereas simple structures or simple sentences are more informal. And again, you know, it’s not always the case, but in general you’ll find longer sentences or more complex sentences are more formal.

You’ll also find informal writing we use relative clauses more. So, if you don’t know what a relative clause is, that’s okay. These are, for example, they use the word: “who”, “which”, “that”, “when” within the sentence. So, an example of a relative clause would be: “Jane Goodall, who works with chimpanzees, is a wonderful woman.” So, if you don’t know about relative clauses, I recommend looking this up. In this video we don’t have enough time to talk about them, but they can really help your writing, especially if you’re writing something in a formal situation. All right, now let’s look at some more tips on how to improve our writing. Okay, so the last thing I’m going to say about formal writing versus informal writing, and I’m talking a lot about this because it’s actually a very important part of writing, is I’m going to talk a little bit about slang, swear words, exaggeration words, and text words, and when to use them. So, slang, it’s words we use with our friends, words like: “cool”, I was going to say “groovy” but nobody says that anymore, so, you know, there’s all sorts of different types of slang.

It’s a word that’s very popular or an expression that’s popular, but it’s not a formal expression. So, “cool” is a really good one, or “awesome”: “That’s awesome”. So, slang we use informally. Same with swear words. Okay? So if you say a bad word, you know, sometimes you might say something to your friend, you might use different swear words when you talk to your friends, hopefully not with strangers, but with people you know well, but you would not use swear words in a formal writing situation. So maybe you might use it in a text, but you wouldn’t use it in a formal writing situation. Also exaggeration words.

What’s an exaggeration word? “Very” is a good example. “He is very funny”, “She is very pretty”, “He is really handsome”, “He’s totally hot”, okay? So these types of words: “very”, “really”, “totally”, we usually save these for informal writing. So if you’re in university and you want to say something is “very”, don’t use the word “very”; there are better words, like, you know… There are a lot of other words you can use as opposed to these ones. Another thing I wanted to say is there’s a lot of words we use now, they’re short forms of words, like, for example: “lol” for “laugh out loud”, “b4” for “before”, “LMAO” for “laugh my ass off”, these are words we use informally.

Okay? We do not use these in formal writing, so it’s important in formal writing to always spell out the word correctly, to use proper spelling, and to avoid some of these words you might be seeing a lot on the internet or in text messaging or on Facebook. Okay, so we’ve covered about formal and informal writing. My last tip for this video is about the importance of using variety in what you’re writing. So what do I mean by “variety”? Well, sometimes when people write, they have certain words that they use again and again and again, and so there’s not a lot of variety in their choice of words. Or you might have somebody else who uses the same sentence structure; maybe they learned the present perfect and they love the present perfect because it took them forever to learn it, so now they use the present perfect in each sentence. So this is not good because we really want variety in what we write, because we want it to be interesting. If you use something too much, it makes what you’re writing look boring.

So, let’s look at an example. I have here a sentence: “Sales have increased. They have increased for many reasons. The increase is because people increasingly like spending money.” Can you tell me: Which word did I use too much? If you said “increase”, you’re correct. I used it one, two, three, four. Okay, so that’s too much in a piece of writing. There are a lot of other words we could be using instead of “increase”. We could be using, you know: “go up”, “rise”. There are a lot of other words. And if you’re not sure of another word for “increase”, a good idea is to check a thesaurus. There are a lot of online thesauruses that can help you add variety to your word choice. So if you make this kind of mistake where you reuse the same word again and again and again, try to learn some other words that have the same meaning. This will really help your writing and make it more interesting. The other thing I wanted to say is that we just talked about how you want variety in words. You also want variety in sentence types. So you want to make sure that, you know, sometimes you use long sentences, and sometimes you use short sentence, sometimes you use, you know, maybe words like: “although”, “when”, “despite”, “in spite of”, and sometimes you might have something a bit simpler.

So instead of reusing the same sentence type and the same sentence structure, try to use different tenses and different structures in the sentences you write. Yeah, so different tenses and try to have different sentence lengths. That will make your writing more interesting. So, thank you for watching this video. I know we covered a lot today, and I have a lot more writing tips coming soon. So, we’ve covered a lot and there’s a lot of things you can practice, so I invite you to come visit our website at www.engvid.com, and there, you can practice what you’ve learned today.

I also invite you to subscribe to my channel; there, you will find a whole bunch of other resources on different grammar points, you know, especially if you’re interested in how to add variety, different videos on vocabulary, on writing, on pronunciation, and all sorts of other topics. So I invite you to check that out. Thank you for watching; and until next time, take care.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

8 Ways to Speak English with an American Accent

{“en”:”Hey, Naturals. What’s going on? It’s your favorite American English teacher Gabby here to help you today with eight Ways that you and anyone can sound more like a North American English Speaker now I know this is just the lesson that you’ve been waiting for I’m going to tell you eight Tricks and secrets that you probably didn’t learn in your normal Traditional English classroom We’re going to really focus on how to make your pronunciation and your accent more American like now I’m not saying that everyone should speak like an American But hey if you want to know how to do that I’m going to explain exactly how so instead of just trying to imitate or copy you’re going to learn the specific points so that you can focus on what it means to speak like an American if You’d like to get a notification for when I make a new English lesson video and I’m putting out a lot of new ones these days make sure that you’re subscribed to Go Natural English here on YouTube by clicking on the big red Subscribe button below It would be my honor to have you join our awesome community of Go Natural English learners here on YouTube and make sure you visit gonaturalenglish.com Where I post the blog lesson for each video to help you learn more Now let’s begin with the 8 ways that you can sound more like an American English speaker Number one, let’s talk about syllables every word that has at least Two syllables or more has a stressed syllable and a weak syllable, so let’s just take the word American We have 3 syllables, right? American that’s four syllables So when we have more than two syllables one is going to be stressed when which syllable is stressed in American Can you hear it? American so it’s the second syllable right so in order to speak more like an American make sure that you really stretch that stressed syllable out make it longer make it louder make it higher say American with me now American and to balance this out the syllables that are not stressed are probably going to sound like a Schwa sound which is up that sound you make of someone punch of you in your gut you go Oh American Can you hear that? Uh American.

Very Good so American English Really stresses the stressed syllable and makes the other syllables very weak number two learn Connected speech. Oh, it’s so easy to say but yet there are so many different rules in connected speech, so let me quickly share several the most important with you in American English Especially whenever you find a t between two vowel sounds it’s going to be a d. We don’t drink water We drink water We don’t put butter on our toast we put butter on our toast okay? so t between two vowels equals a d a T between an N, and a vowel gets removed International not International International dentist not dentist, but dentist when you have an N then a T then a vowel sometimes it becomes a glottal stop like Mountain or Or a vowel than a double t And a vowel like button or cotton when you have a t or a d between two Consonants it often gets removed old man, not old man old man most famous not most Famous, but most famous we blend and link sounds together when one word ends with a consonant and the next begins with a vowel or when the next word begins with the same consonant as the word before it ands With that was a big jumbled mess We blend and link sounds together from one word to the next for example social life becomes social life We also make two words seem as though They were one when we blend sounds together like this afternoon this afternoon Now I know I’m going really fast because I’ve made Specific lessons about most of these points in other video lessons on the go natural English channel So make sure to check those out if you’d like a more detailed explanation of each point You can click up here for one of my best lessons on linking and connected speech Assimilation is huge in American English did you becomes didja and don’t you becomes dontcha? intrusion where we insert a new sound for example between he and Asked we insert the /j/ sound he asked or do and if we insert a /w/ sound do it he asked to do it and in some parts of the united states you have an R intrusion between vowels – like for example between Media and attention media attention Finally let me tell you about Elision where we omit a sound for example the t in the word kept when it comes before going kept going Number three in American English the R is so important and so frustrating for many English learners because it can be quite different than in your native language be aware of r-colored vowels for example in the word word Or why is it not ward it’s her word or for example World why is it not World its world.

So that is an r-colored vowel. We’re about and before an R and it becomes err so a lot of American English vowels will become this sound that sounds like a pirate talking so get out your pirate hooks and go err When you make this sound or not because that’s kind of weird when we have an r at the end of the word we usually pronounce it strongly I say usually because some people like in new England will cut that R off for example I parked my car Well, that’s a Boston accent and yes, I have lived in Boston, but I never adopted that accent. I would say I park my car so but watch out for Different ways of using the R if you really want to sound American you need some American phrases like instead of asking How are you you can ask.

What’s up or instead of saying That’s nice, or that’s good You could say that’s cool. Or that’s awesome in general when you speak English try to speak a little bit louder verbs use a ton of phrasal verbs we rarely use a normal kind of academic verb in everyday speech in conversation so instead of the verb to exit or to leave say to get out or instead of saying to arrive say to Get in or instead of saying to start or to begin you could say get going Get going could also mean to leave so phrasal verbs can be kind of confusing but they’re really key to use a lot of them if you want to sound like an American Native English speaker also start creating verbs out of nouns Like Google Google’s a noun, but we say let’s google it google that question or friend friend is a noun Right well I can friend you on Facebook So friend is now a verb so just take any noun you want and make it into a verb and you’ll sound more American and finally Vocabulary so I did suggest to you some very American phrases like awesome, and what’s up? But if you want to know quickly a few words that are different in American English as opposed to British English, we Say fall not autumn.

We say faucet not tap We say apartment not flat elevator. Not lift diaper not nappy TV not telly and Candy not sweets. Oh, and one more that always catches me off guard We say take out not take away when we go to a restaurant, and we want to take the food home So I think that you are properly prepared now to sound really American like a native speaker So if you have questions about any of these points, I know I went really fast leave a comment Make sure to subscribe so that you can see you my answers to Your questions if I make a video to answer them and make sure to visit me at gonaturalenglish.com For more learning, and that’s where you can get the English Fluency Formula ebook that I wrote for you as well Thank you so much for watching and I’ll see you in another video lesson soon.

Bye for now. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Classroom English: Vocabulary & Expressions for Students

Hi. Welcome again to www.engvid.com. I’m Adam. Today’s lesson comes as a request, because I know that there are actually quite a few of you who are teachers of English, and you wanted to know some classroom English. So, today, we’re going to look at classroom English. This is more for beginners, especially people who have just joined an English class, an ESL class, EFL class, etc. and you’re starting to get used to the classroom environment, and you’re not exactly sure what the teacher is saying, what you should say, etc. We’re going to start with the teachers. What do teachers say that you need to understand? Okay? [Clears throat] Excuse me. First, the teacher will take attendance, or the teacher will take roll call. Sorry, these are two separate words, “roll call”. Basically, they want to know who is here and who is not here. Okay? So, if a student is in the class, he or she is present. So, if the teacher says: -“Bill?” -“Present.” -“Mary?” -“Present.” -“Bueller? Bueller? Bueller?” Bueller is absent. He or she is not in the class.

So, “absent”, not here. “Present”, here. If the teacher has finished with attendance and starts to teach the class, and a student comes in then, that student is late. And they get a little check. Too many lates, you get into trouble. Now, you could be absent, but you can have an excused absent, means that you have a note from your parents, from your doctor, from your boss, or the teacher just knows that you’re not coming today and it’s okay; it’s excused.

Now, the teacher will give you commands. He or she will tell you to do things. Okay? So, it’s very important that you understand what to do. If a teacher says: “Put up your hand”, or: “Raise your hand to ask a question, to make a comment, to ask to go to the bathroom”, put up your hand. Raise your hand. Don’t speak out. Because if everybody speaks out, it’s just noise. Put up your hand, ask your question, get your answer. Okay? Then, the teacher will ask you: “Take out your notebooks. Take out your pens.

Take out your earphones.” Basically, get them ready, we are going to use them. Okay. “Take your seats.” Basically means sit down, sit. Okay? So, he’s trying to get organized, or she is trying to get organized. Next, they’ll say: “Take out your book. Turn to page 37.” Means open your book, page 37, let’s start reading, working, etc. Now, if the teacher wants you to do things, but not alone… For example, if you’re doing math, yeah, you do it alone no problem. If you’re doing ESL, the teacher will want you to work in pairs. It means two people together, so you can speak. “Work in groups”, means get into a few people together; three, four, five. If he wants a specific number, he will say: “Get into groups of”, or: “Work in groups of three.” So, you find your two friends, three sit together, do the exercise. Now, if the teacher… As everybody’s talking, the teacher wants everybody be quiet and listen to one student, he will say or she will say: “Please pay attention to Jack. Jack is going to speak. Everybody, please pay attention to Jack.” Or if you’re doing exercise, if the teacher wants you to be careful about one word or one grammar structure: “Pay attention to the independent clause.” Means be very focused, be aware.

Okay? So, these are the basic things you need to know what… That your teacher will say. Now, you’re the student, you have questions or you don’t understand something, what are you going to say or what are you going to ask? Let’s see. Okay, so now, you’re the student and, you know, sometimes you don’t understand everything the teacher says. So, there are things you can say or ask from the teacher, of course, to help you.

If you didn’t hear something, what will you say? You could say: “I didn’t catch the last part.” Now, if you say: “I didn’t hear”, and I’m the teacher, I have been speaking for 10 minutes, and you say: “I didn’t hear.” I’ll say: “What? Everything? 10 minutes?” I can’t say again. So, “I didn’t hear”, or: “I didn’t catch the last part.” So, I will go back and say again the last part, or: “I didn’t hear the part about what to ask.” Or: “I didn’t hear the part about independent clauses”, or whatever the lesson is about. So, be specific. Tell the teacher which part you didn’t hear. He or she will say it again. Or you can just say: “Could you repeat that please?” Repeat, say again.

If you didn’t hear: “Could you repeat that please? Could you say that again?” But again, say which part. Be specific. Or: “I didn’t hear/catch what you said after here.” So, tell the teacher you heard everything until here, and from here, you didn’t hear, you didn’t catch. “Catch” means hear or understand. Okay? And if you’re having a lot of trouble, ask a teacher: “Can you please speak more slowly?” And the teacher will slow down, and it will be much easier for you to understand. Okay, now, if you are learning something… And again, we’re learning English and you’re not familiar with what the teacher says…

It’s something new or you don’t really know what it is, first of all, make sure you know how to spell the word. If it’s a new word, ask the teacher: “How do you spell that?” And the teacher will say: “S-p-e-l-l.” Spell. Okay? “How do you spell that?” Now, if you don’t know the meaning of the word and the teacher just continues speaking, put up your hand, say: “I’m sorry. What does this word mean?” And the teacher will explain to you. Now, if you’re learning in another country, you’re learning EFL, English as a foreign language, you can say: “How do you say this word?” in your language? If you’re learning in Japan: “How do you say ‘spell’ in Japanese?”, “How do you say ‘spell’ in Spanish?”, “How do you say ‘spell'” in any language? And: “What is this word in Japanese?”, “What is ‘spell’ in Japanese?” So, these two basically mean the same thing. By the way, these marks means same as what was above, just so you know. What is the word in your language? If you’re learning outside. If you’re learning in Canada, for example, and you say: “How do you say this word in Spanish?” I don’t know.

I don’t actually speak Spanish. I wish I spoke Spanish. I will learn one day, but for now, I don’t. So, you have to be careful. Okay. Finally, if you need a bit more information, you want the teacher to explain a little bit more, maybe you understand or you heard, but you’re not really sure. So, you can always ask for more specifics. “Can you use this word in a sentence?” So, for example, you heard the word, you understand the word, but you’re not sure how it would fit in a sentence, how to use it. Ask. “Can you use…?” Like, for the teacher: “Can you please use this word in a sentence so I can see how it works?” Or: “Can you give me”, or: “Can you give us”, the class, “an example of this?” Okay? So, for example, the teacher taught you about some new technology. You understand, but you want to see in real life what this means. So, you want examples of things that use this technology, so you ask.

Now, this is everything you need to know, teachers, students entering the classroom, but the most important thing you need to remember: if you don’t understand something, ask. There’s no such thing as a bad question or a stupid question, or you’re not sure about. If you’re not sure, ask. The teacher will be happy to tell you the answer. He or she will be happy to repeat a few times until you understand. I’m sure that other… Your classmates, other people in the class, they also have questions, but they are too shy to ask.

You ask. You get the answer, you move on. Okay? Go to www.engvid.com. If you have any questions for me, write them in the comments box. I will answer them. Do the quiz, make sure you understand everything. And come back again to www.engvid.com. Bye..

As found on Youtube

Learn English vocabulary in the BATHROOM :)

“Teacher! Teacher! Ronnie! Ronnie! Can I go — can I go bathroom?” “What? ‘Can I go bathroom?’ Okay. ‘Can I go to the bathroom?’ Yes. ‘Can I go bathroom?’ No. Not in here, please. If you said, “Can I go bathroom”, that means that you are going to pee where you are. Please go to the bathroom or the washroom to pee. Today’s lesson is all about going to the toilet. This thing is called a “plunger”. Plunge, plunge, plunge! What do you do with this in the bathroom, you wonder? This is a plunger. What we use this for is in the toilet. So let’s imagine that your friend, your mother, your father, your brother, your sister, or you ate a lot of food last night. And then, you went to the toilet. You took a massive dump. What is a “massive dump”? A “massive dump” is slang. “Take a massive dump.” “Massive” means very big, and “dump” — let me draw it for you — means poo.

Unchi! Japanese style. So “take a massive dump” means “to have a bowel movement”, if you will. Okay? But it’s so large that maybe it clogs or plugged the toilet. So that means I cannot flush the toilet. Now, basic bathroom etiquette. Please, when you have finished whatever you’re doing in there, please always flush the toilet. There’s a little mechanism on the toilet. It’s usually a silver color. It’s very easy. You press it. All of the water and all of the extra things in the toilet floating here — maybe you have some poo — it goes away so that the next person does not have to see what you ate for dinner. I don’t want to see that. “Oh, Uncle John had corn last night.” Unnecessary for me to see. So please, I beg of you, if you are going to use the toilet, please flush it, okay? There was a rhyme that I knew — I still know it. It’s called, “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown, flush it down.” I would like to change the poem to say, “Flush the toilet.

I don’t care what color it is. I don’t want to see it.” Or you’re going to be getting one of these stuck in your face. So rule No. 1: Flush the toilet, okay? With a plunger, you are going to — as I said — unclog the plugged toilet. What happens in a toilet or in a sink is you have a drain, okay? A “drain” is a hole at the bottom where all the water goes into.

It goes to Magic Land. Okay? So the sink and the toilet both have a drain, as does your bathtub and your shower. What happens is hair or other debris gets stuck in the drain. So the drain gets clogged or plugged. It basically means that all of this stuff can’t go down the pipe, and it backs up. So the water doesn’t go down. Dangerous with a toilet. Not as bad with a sink. Acceptable with a bathtub and a shower. All you need to do is plunge it. Make sure it’s clean. Now, what do you do in a sink? Usually, when you go to the sink, you wash your hands. Rule No. 2: After you go to the toilet, you flush the toilet, okay? Then, it’s really, really cool. It’s the coolest thing ever that you wash your hands. Especially for men. Guys, what are you touching? What are you doing? I don’t want to touch a doorknob that you have touched after you’ve taken — sorry. After you’ve gone to the toilet.

You’ve touched your man part. You did not wash your hand, and then you touched the doorknob. I’m touching your knob, too, okay? Literally. I don’t want to touch your knob. Please wash your hands after you flush the toilet. Good. Another thing that you might find in a bathroom or a washroom is a bathtub, and/or you may have a shower. Now, the difference between a bathtub and a shower, it’s very easy. When you have or take a bath, you’re going to do it in the bathtub. In the bathtub, you get to lie down. You get to relax. Maybe you have some bubbles. Maybe you have a rubber ducky. That’s a duck, okay? I’m an artist. That’s a duck. A shower, it’s very small, and you don’t have enough room to lie down, so you are going to stand up in the shower, okay? It doesn’t matter if you say the verb “take” or “have”.

So you can say, “I’m going to have a bath. I’m going to take a bath. Or I’m going to have a shower. I’m going to take a shower.” The other thing that you can say is — “shower” is also a verb. So you can say, “I’m going to shower. I’m going to shower.” You can’t say, “I’m going to bath, or I’m going to bathtub.” Because “bathtub” and “bath” — these guys are only nouns, okay? A shower can be a verb and a noun.

English is so confusing sometimes. Even when you’re just trying to be clean. I’ll help you. Don’t worry. What other things can you do in the bath — what other things can you do in the bathroom or the washroom? You can look in the mirror. When you look in the mirror, you see your reflection. “It’s me! Oh, wow.” So when you look in the mirror, you see a mirror image of yourself. Sometimes it’s a little dirty. Another thing that people are, I think, kind of confused about sometimes is the difference between “washroom” and “bathroom”. Honestly, I don’t care. If someone said, “May I go to the washroom?” Okay. “May I go to the bathroom?” Okay. Really, the difference is this. This might blow your mind. Properly, a bathroom has a bath. A washroom would normally have a toilet and a sink. But if you’re in a public place, it doesn’t matter if you say “bathroom” or “washroom”.

One mistake that I have made in Canada is one time I was shopping, and I had to go to the washroom. So I went to the person who worked at the store, and I said, “Excuse me. Where’s your toilet?” The person looked at me like I had two heads. “Where’s my toilet?” “Yeah. Where’s your toilet?” “We don’t have toilets.” “You don’t have toilets? This is a department store. There are many people. It’s an American department store — [coughs] Target. I know you have a toilet. I know you do. “We don’t sell no toilets.” “Oh, I don’t want to buy a toilet. I want to use your public toilet.” “Oh, the bathroom!” “Yes, the bathroom, then.” “It’s over there, to the left.” “Thank you.” So I’ve made the mistake of saying, “Where’s the toilet.” In Canada and in North America, it’s more natural to say “washroom” or “bathroom”.

There’s another one that people use sometimes, too. And it’s called — maybe you’ll see it on the sign — a “restroom”. That’s fine. I’m just not too sure what you’re doing when you’re having a rest in the bathroom. For me, I’d rather take a rest, like, in my bedroom or maybe on the couch or the sofa. I don’t really feel that comfortable resting in a public toilet on the sink.

I don’t know. Did you have any bathroom stories? I’d love to hear them in the comments. Please comment. Say “hi”. Tell me about your bathroom experience. Until then, toodles..

As found on Youtube