MÌNH ĐẠT 9.0 IELTS READING NHƯ THẾ NÀO (P1)

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10 Tips To Build Your Vocabulary | Ways To Learn More English Words

{“en”:”Hello! I’m Emma from mmmEnglish! What’s the best way to learn new English vocabulary? Ahh the million dollar question! If only I could give the ultimate answer to that question. It’s a question that I get asked daily – literally! There is no single best way. There is no quick solution, but I do have 10 tips or recommendations in this lesson that will help you to improve your English vocabulary. So you need to find the best way for you and to do that you need to take a few moments to think about YOU. Think about your interests. Do you like reading? The movies? Watching the news? How do you like to learn? Do you like to learn inside or outside, in a group or alone? What type of learner are you? How do you best take in information? And what’s your schedule like? When can you study? On the train or with your kids? Use this information to find the opportunities to learn and enjoy English.

The truth is that to successfully learn new vocabulary, you need to create really good study habits. You need to keep it interesting and you need to make sure that you’re having fun! It’s something that you need to be doing every day so you need to find a way to involve things that you love to do. Me? I get really bored reading grammar books and listening to words through dictionaries. I’m much more likely to stay motivated if I’m eating or drinking so I like to study around meals.

Hey, you may laugh but it works for me! Consistency is key when you’re learning new words. You can’t just learn them once and magically they’re kept inside your head forever. You need to hear them again and again. Understand how they’re used in different context or how they’re conjugated or used in different, in word families. You need to use them yourself. The truth is that we all learn differently.

So in this video I’m going to talk about 10 different tools and techniques that you can use to improve your vocabulary. You might not like all of them but you will definitely enjoy some of them and hopefully you can make them a part of your daily or your weekly routine. And if you’ve got any of your own suggestions about ways to learn vocabulary, then add them to the comments below! Share the love with everyone, people! So, the first suggestion or the first tip is get better at studying new words.

Keep a vocabulary journal. Don’t roll your eyes at me, you can do this in lots of different ways. If you think it’s dorky to carry around a notebook, then find a way that works for you. There are lots of apps that can help you to do this – apps on your smartphone. And it’s just as easy to make notes there. Your phone is great because it’s always with you but if you prefer to keep a notebook that’s just as good.

So neat ways of doing this are creating lists or by creating vocabulary maps. However, you do it you need to keep updating it and you need to keep building on this list and don’t just write the word down. Go deeper! If it’s a noun, learn whether it’s countable or uncountable. Learn the prefixes and suffixes so that you can build on those words. Learn synonyms for those words. You know, if you said “I felt angry”, there are so many other options.

Annoyed, irritated, furious, frustrated, or cranky. Learn if any of these words are used in phrasal verbs or idioms. Number two. When you do learn new words, don’t just learn them on their own. Learn them with the words that they are often used with. These are called collocations. Two or more English words that are often said together or used together. They sound right because native speakers often use them together.

For example, you throw or have or plan a party. You don’t make a party. Or instead of memorising the word, apply, learn the phrase “apply for a job” or “apply for a citizenship” or “apply for a visa”. You can learn hundreds of new individual words but you’ll be frustrated if you can’t put them together in a sentence that sounds correct and natural. When you learn words in groups, you’re learning the words with the verb, the nouns, the prepositions that they are commonly used with so you’ll sound much more natural when you speak.

Three. Learn new vocabulary through stories. Stories are full of new words, phrases and interesting expressions that show you how words come together in a really entertaining way. Just like the collocation method, you are learning new vocabulary in context. You’re not only learning what words to use but you’re learning how to use them. An important note to remember is that it’s important to challenge yourself but not feel completely overwhelmed and confused. Read stories that are fun, that are enjoyable and that help you to feel confident with English. Start with children’s books if you need to! “Emma are you serious? Start with children’s books?” Yes I’m serious! There are lots of great children’s books out there that are interesting, they’re funny, they’re full of adventure. Start with children’s books and when you’re reading them and it becomes too easy, you can try something a bit more challenging. In the description below I’ve linked to some great books that you can get started with.

In this wonderful day and age that we live in, you can also find audiobooks for almost any book that you can imagine and when you’re learning English, hearing how the words are pronounced is so important because English is not phonetic. In English, words are often not pronounced the way that you think they are, so listening and reading at the same time is even better! I use Audible to download my audiobooks and listen to them while I’m jogging, while I’m travelling, while I’m drifting off to sleep. And I’ve listed some really great books in the description box below. Plus, there’s a link down there to try your first audio book for free and I really recommend it.

Make sure you choose stories and topics that you love and that you’re interested in. On that note, TED Talks are also really great for this because there’s TED Talks on almost every topic imaginable and you can also follow the transcript as the speaker is speaking. I’ll link you to some of my favourite TED Talks in the description below too. Another great tip is to learn new vocabulary through songs. If you love listening to music, there is no doubt that learning new vocabulary through songs will help you to remember them. You need to find songs where the words are not sung too fast so that you can hear each word and how it’s pronounced. It’s more effective if you can download the lyrics and read them as you’re listening.

There are so many more benefits to learning vocabulary through songs! They get stuck in your head – if they’re good – so you’ll be singing them and practising them so often you won’t even feel like you’re doing it – in the shower, while you’re exercising, while you’re driving to work. Songs also use colloquial language or slang language that’s really common in English. You’ll also hear how words are contracted and reduced and it’s going to improve your speaking skills too.

If you’re singing out loud you’ll be improving aspects of your pronunciation. And the rhythm of music helps you to memorise new vocabulary. I’ll also link down there to some great websites where you can get lyrics for English songs and also, if you’ve got any suggestions about great English music that you like to listen to, make sure you add it to the comments. The next tip. Get better at using online dictionaries. Online dictionaries offer so many ways to practise and learn new English vocabulary. Let’s look at the word, produce, as an example.

When I look up this word in an online dictionary, I can read the definition, I can read and sometimes listen to the different verb forms, producers, produced, producing. I can read lots of example sentences that show how this word is used. I can also learn synonyms and collocations. You can also see the entire word family: produce, producer, production, productive, unproductive, productively, product, produce. You’ll also listen to the pronunciation and in this example, you’ll be surprised (maybe) to learn that the verb produce and the noun produce are pronounced differently. I recommend some online dictionaries below in the description box. I use Oxford online dictionaries and Macmillan online dictionaries. They also have really great apps for iPhone and for Android. So go and explore all of the amazing vocabulary building tools.

Plus, if you sign up to their email list you’re going to get sent a new English word every day and that’s just another way to get more practice with new vocabulary! OK, what about flashcards and labels? Flashcards have been a really favourite way of learning new vocabulary for years and years! But there are lots more options available for us today. You might prefer to hand-write English phrases on one side of a card and then translate them into your own native language on the other, but you can also use an SRS program such as Anki.

Now I downloaded Anki a few weeks ago and I think it’s amazing! It allows you to remember a large number of words in a short amount of time. And it also lets you work at your own pace so I guess it’s kind of like digital flashcards and as you practise, the program remembers what words you get wrong and it shows you them more frequently. So you get to practise some more! It’s a really efficient way of studying, I can’t recommend it highly enough! I use it while I’m studying Spanish.

Another tip – my favourite tip – is to describe the world around you, what’s happening around you. If you like using a dictionary to learn new vocabulary, getting into the habit of describing things that are happening around you in English is a really great way to study. When you’re unsure of words, look them up. It will help you to fill in the gaps in your vocabulary. So for example, when you’re at your local supermarket, ask yourself “Do I remember the names for everything that’s in the fridge?” or “How can I describe the woman waiting in line?” or “Do I know the English names of all of these vegetables?” When you can’t think of a word, you stop and you look it up.

Understand how it’s used, practise it and then use it again next time you’re at the supermarket. You can also do it on your way to work on the bus, as you’re going past things you can think of the vocabulary and try and fill in the gaps when you don’t know how to describe it or explain it. Number nine – my favourite – imitate a native speaker. Imitation and shadowing are great techniques to improve pronunciation and spoken English but they’re also awesome for learning new vocabulary, in context too. I have a huge range of imitation lessons that are available on different topics, so if you want to check them out you can go up here or I’ll link to them at the end of the video. And number ten. If you are confident enough, speak and practise being in conversations. By the time you’ve reached pre-intermediate to intermediate level, you already have enough vocabulary in you, you can communicate what you want.

The message might not be perfect but it’s enough and it’s at this point that practising real conversation is going to catapult your English skills and that means push them much further than if you just keep doing what you’re doing. In conversations, you’re developing core language skills simultaneously. You’re listening, you’re asking questions, you’re learning new vocabulary and context. You’re pushing yourself to find new ways to express your ideas. And if you’re not expressing yourself clearly enough, you have to find a new way of explaining yourself. And all of this is happening at once, there’s lots of pressure, there is no better way to build your language skills than immersing yourself inside an English conversation. There are so many different ways that you can do this. You can do it online, there are companies that connect you with people who want to study English like Cambly and Lingoda.

I’ll write a link to all of those in the description below too. Or in that link up there. I have a Facebook group that encourages conversation amongst women so if you’re a woman, you are welcome to join! It’s free and there is a link in the description below as well. So that’s it, my ten suggestions for improving your vocabulary. Try them out and let me know what you think! And if you’ve got some other suggestions about ways to improve your vocabulary, add them in the comments! Most importantly, you need to find ways to learn and practise vocabulary that will work best for you because hey, we all learn differently. We all have different priorities and different amounts of time to spend when we’re learning new languages. You need to create your own good study habits and find ways to enjoy English while you’re learning new words.

If you haven’t already subscribed to the mmmEnglish Channel, you should definitely do it! There’s always new lessons to keep you busy. Watch one of my imitation lessons right here to help you build your vocabulary and improve your pronunciation and become a better English speaker. If you want to watch some of the other mmmEnglish lessons, go right here. Thanks for watching and I’ll see you in the next lesson. Bye for now!. “}

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Hypnotherapy for anxiety

The 4 Main Meanings of the word Crook English Teacher Mark’s English Lessons Aussie Slang ESL EFL

{“en”:”Hey guys, how are you going? Freezing hey, absolutely freezing today. Today as promised we are going to look at the word CROOK. There are 4 main uses of the word crook. Um yeah, 4 ones that we use commonly, there may be others but I wouldn’t worry about them too much, this is enough for now. So the first one crook, I’m crook, I’m sick, I’m as crook as a dog, I feel crook in the guts, Oh my guts, my stomach, I feel crook in the guts, yeah? You can also say, I’m feeling crook, yeah? My wife’s crook, the kids are crook, everyone’s crook.

Um, I’ve just written some notes, I’ll just check I’ve got them all here, Oh you can ask a question, Um,” Are you feeling crook?” Sick, “are you feeling sick?” Um, “Have you been crook,” “Where have you been crook? Where have you been? Have you been crook?” Yeah, so. Anyway that’s the first one and I’ve written some notes for you to look underneath the video, there’s um, a comprehensive lot of notes, um so you can check up on that as well. o.k? The second meaning is, um for a part of your body to not be working well. So for example you could say, “I’ve got a crook back.” which means I’ve got a bad back.

Yeah, or “I’ve got a crook knee, it’s not good, it hurts in the cold. Maybe like today, it’s freezing, maybe your knee plays up in the cold, which means, If it plays up it means, it doesn’t work well, yeah, maybe, you’ve got arthritis or something, um, yeah, so let me just check, other words that you can use instead of crook here are words like dodgy which means not good and we’ll look at in another lesson but you can say I’ve got a dodgy knee or a dodgy back yeah or a dodgy ticker T I C K E R means “heart,” I’ve got a dodgy ticker it means I’ve got a bad heart I’ve gotta be careful. Um yeah or “bung,” a very Aussie word, B U N G I’ve got a knee or I’ve got a bung leg, yeah, um yeah I’ve got some sentences here for example, ‘She’s got a crook back, she shouldn’t be lifting anything heavy.

O.k. So that’s the second meaning for your body part not to be working well. The third meaning can mean and this is not slang this is just a word um used as a noun, like he’s a crook, um like a criminal an untrustworthy person, you wouldn’t trust them, yeah, so ” Be careful of that guy, he’s a crook.” For example, someone who’s like does um yeah small crimes like stealing and car theft they’re a small time crook. Big, big time crook you know like mafia type, type people, um, yeah really really bad dudes anyway, um, so yeah for example um, “She was a crook, (past tense) she was a crook but she’s changed now.” And oh as an adjective you can actually use it as an adjective that um for example he’s crooked which means he’s he’s not honest yeah, if you’re straight, then this means that you are um you’re not dishonest, there’e another meaning but we won’t go into that now, o.k.

Um the fourth meaning I’ve got here um this is very Aussie again and not not as common as the others but it’s still used a lot in Australia, if somebody goes crook on you they get angry with you, so for example, “My mum went crook on me last night, my mum went crook on me last night because I hadn’t done my homework,” yeah? Or “I’ll get crook on you if you, um, yeah, if you don’t clean up your mess, so you can say, “on you, with you,” um often, more often on you, I’ll get crook you, it sounds quite strange but it’s just an expression which means angry, so yeah you can say, “Dad went crook on me because I smashed his car,” which my dad actually did go crook on me and fair enough I I smashed 2 of his cars and blew up another motor, so he went crook on me and I I probably deserved that, sorry dad, um, yeah, that was a long time ago, all is forgiven now.

Um there is another meaning, actually, I’ll just give you the question for that, ” Did your parents go crook on you for getting home so late last night?” That’s another way of saying get angry with you. but there another word “crooked,” which means not straight, yeah, for example here, you can see here, I’ve drawn a crooked line, it’s not straight and underneath a straight line o.k? So that’s a different meaning although in some ways it’s similar isn’t it? You could have your hat on crooked, here it’s on straight, hey man you recognise that? Or it can go on crooked, yeah, maybe your collar is crooked, your shirts all crooked, um or a picture, the picture’s straight here now, let’s bring that a bit closer for you, it’s straight, now it’s crooked so you need to straighten up, it’s crooked, now it’s straight, crooked, straight, o.k.

um, that’s it for today, I hope you learnt a lot, it’s a well used word, um worth learning all of those meanings because we do use it in many different ways, o.k. I think next time, we’ll have a look at the word, “dodgy,” to help you out with some more Aussie slang, this is Mark from Mark’s English lessons, Aussie slang, um, thank you guys for all the likes and subscriptions, and for supporting me and I’ll continue to support you o.k? Have a great day, keep warm, rug up, rug up, R U G means to keep warm, yeah, you wear a hat,a scarf, beanie, well hat and beanie the same thing, but keep warm, wear a nice big jumper and jacket. O.k take care, see you soon. Bye.. “}

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Stop smoking

Silent Letters | English Pronunciation & Vocabulary | PART 1

{“en”:”Oh my gosh guys! How annoying are silent letters in English words? What are they even doing there?! This video is all about English words with silent letters in them. When do you pronounce those letters and when don’t you pronounce those letters? I’m going to teach you a few simple rules to help you pronounce English words correctly. Don’t forget to turn on the subtitles either. The button is just down there, so you can follow along.

There are a lot of English words that have silent letters in them. And there are lots of silent letters in English! About sixty percent of all English words have a silent letter! No wonder pronunciation is so frustrating, right? And they can be silent these letters, but they’re not always silent! So you have to be careful! You need to know a few basic rules to help with the pronunciation of silent letters in English words. Okay, let’s start at the top with the letter A. Now the letter A can be silent especially in words that end in ‘-ally’. Like these: So, I’m not pronouncing: Cut the A out. Get rid of it! Now there’s a rule to remember with the letter B. It’s always silent when it follows the letter M So, practice them with me. I’m not pronouncing the B, I’m just pronouncing the M consonant sound.

And the letter B is often silent when it before the consonant T, so think of these examples: So, see in all of those examples, my lips are closing and coming together to form the B sound, I’m just pronouncing the T. Now, the letter C can cause a few problems because it’s often silent after the letter S, like in these very common examples – they are quite tricky! So that’s the silent C. So what about the letter D? Yep, it can be silent too! So, I’m not pronouncing the D in ‘sandwich’ I’m just pronouncing the consonant N sound before it. Try it with me one more time. And a D can be very quiet, not quite silent, but very quiet in front of a G, like in these examples: So in these examples the D and the G combined together produce the ‘dg’ consonant sound ‘dg’ Okay, so the letter E can often be silent at the end of a word.

I’m pretty sure you know this one already, like these examples: But that E on the end, although it might be silent, it can affect the pronunciation of the vowel sound before it. Let’s look at these examples: So see how the E at the end, although it’s not pronounced, is affecting the vowel sound before it. It makes it longer. So hid /i/ becomes hide /i:/ But if the E is the final letter in the word but it’s the only vowel sound then it needs to be pronounced, like in these examples E can also be silent at the end of past tense regular verbs, which all end in ED, right? But they’re not always pronounced like it is in ‘wanted’.

So, you can hear the ED sound there ‘-ed’, ‘-ed’. It’s its own syllable. But a lot of the time that E isn’t pronounced Now they could be a little bit tricky, so let’s do it again! Okay, so a G can also be silent too! Think about the word sign, champagne, design, or foreign. All of these examples have a silent G. And the combination GH can also be silent when it comes after a vowel sound Now, the letter H is often silent too, often when it’s following a W, like in the examples And sometimes it’s not pronounced at the start of a word like honest and hour.

And sometimes the H is not pronounced when it follows any of these three letters: C, G or R. Now, most of the time CH is pronounced ‘ch’ but on small occasions or rare occasions it’s not pronounce, the H is silent. Good news! The I is not usually silent, it’s usually pronounced. Except in the word business! Okay, K! Now I know you know this one! A K is not pronounced when it comes before an N. The letter L can be silent too and it’s quite common when you look at this list. But consider this rule to be a bit of a cheat because the letter L is quite difficult to pronounce in all of these words, even for a native speaker! So, this makes it easier! In these words where /l/ is really difficult to pronounce then it’s silent! Ready? Let’s try it. So, we got through quite a bit but we’re only halfway through! So, if you want to keep watching and keep practicing with silent letters in English then click the link in the description box and go to part 2 of this video. Guys, I love making these videos for you and I love hearing from you as well, so if you want to say hi come over to my facebook page at mmmEnglish and say hello, ask question, introduce yourself! I’d love to hear from you there.

Make sure you check out part 2 – the links down there! See you soon!. “}

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Study English in London

English Imitation Lessons | Speak More Clearly & Confidently

{“en”:”Hello I’m Emma from mmmEnglish, helping you to build your confidence as an English speaker. In this video I have a very special lesson for you that’s using The Imitation Technique. I also have something that’s very exciting to share at the end of this lesson so make sure you keep watching. Practicing with the imitation technique can dramatically improve your English communication skills. It’s worked for thousands of my students already and it can work for you too! Why? Because with this technique you learn to communicate with more than just words. Is clear pronunciation important when you’re speaking English? Yes, of course it is! But so is stress and intonation, so is using tone and body language to express your emotions and so is pause to create suspense or add emphasis.

It’s not just what you say but how you say it in English. With the imitation technique you’ll learn how to perform English. It’s like an actor in the movies or a pop star singing on stage. Are you ready to give it a try? In this imitation lesson, you’ll hear me telling you a story. Listen to the tone and the intonation in my voice while I’m speaking. You’ll hear that I’m being supportive and I’m encouraging a friend to do something.

Here’s how it works, you’ll hear the same story three times. The first time you hear it, you’ll just need to listen and read. Listen to the topic, the vocabulary and my expression. You’re learning the script. Then, you’ll hear the same script again but this time there will be a short pause after each clause or sentence. This is so that you can say it aloud, exactly as it was said in the recording. I want you to imitate me, to copy me, the native English speaker. The last step is the most challenging one. Try to shadow me while I’m speaking! Perform each sentence, with the same expression and intonation, while I’m speaking. If you don’t shadow me perfectly, don’t worry! It’s meant to be a challenge. But this step is really important, it helps you to practice all of these skills in a different way. OK, it’s time to give it a try! Good luck! You can do this. Ready? This is step number one, listen and read. You know what? I think you should just go for it! I mean, what have you got to lose? You’ve got plenty of experience and nobody is more passionate about this kind of work than you.

Just because you don’t have a degree shouldn’t make a difference. I mean, you’ve been doing this for real for so much longer than anyone who’s just come out of university. Besides, what’s the worst thing that can happen? They might turn you down, but who cares? It’s not like you really need this job. But imagine if you get it! Living on an island, going for a swim every morning before work, eating fresh fruit and seafood every day! I think you should just go for it! Then I can come and visit you! What if I help you? I could make you a logo or something? Or I could help you with your cover letter. You’ve got to admit it’s pretty exciting and you’re perfect for this role. Come on! What do you think?! Step Two. Great! Now you’re ready to imitate the speaker. Listen to the speaker and in the pause, repeat what they said exactly as they said it.

You know what? I think you should just go for it! I mean, what have you got to lose? You’ve got plenty of experience, and nobody is more passionate about this kind of work than you. Just because you don’t have a degree shouldn’t make a difference. I mean, you’ve been doing this for real for so much longer than anyone who’s just come out of university. Besides, what’s the worst thing that can happen? They might turn you down, but who cares? It’s not like you really need this job. But imagine if you get it! Living on an island, going for a swim every morning before work, eating fresh fruit and seafood every day! I think you should just go for it. Then I can come and visit you! What if I help you? I could make you a logo or something? Or I could help you with your cover letter? You’ve got to admit it’s pretty exciting and you’re perfect for this role. Come on! What do you think? Step Three OK, you’re ready for a new challenge now! Let’s try shadowing. Copy the speaker while they are speaking.

Remember, don’t worry about your mistakes. You know what? I think you should just go for it! I mean what have you got to lose? You’ve got plenty of experience and nobody is more passionate about this kind of work than you. Just because you don’t have a degree shouldn’t make a difference. I mean, you’ve been doing this for real for so much longer than anyone who’s just come out of university. Besides, what’s the worst thing that can happen? They might turn you down, but who cares? It’s not like you really need this job. But imagine if you get it! Living on an island, going for a swim every morning before work, eating fresh fruit and seafood every day! I think you should just go for it.

Then I can come and visit you! What if I help you? I could make you a logo or something? Or I could help you with your cover letter? You’ve got to admit it’s pretty exciting and you’re perfect for this role. Come on! What do you think? Awesome! Remember, practice makes perfect! So when you’re ready, try the next lesson. So, how did you go? Keep practicing with this lesson until you look and you sound just like a native English speaker! Before you go I want to share something super exciting with you! My students have been having so much success with The Imitation Technique that I’ve created a whole new range of imitation lessons so that you can speak more confidently too! In this new series of over 10 videos, there are different native speakers, there are different topics to talk about and there are vocabulary guides to help you study with every video lesson.

This is your chance to improve the way that you speak English as fast as possible. To find these new lessons head over to my website at www.mmmenglish.com/imitation Thank you for spending the time with me today practicing your English. I’ll see you on the next video lesson! Bye for now!. “}

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Study English in London

10 English Words You’re (probably) Mispronouncing! | Difficult Pronunciation | Common Mistakes

Hello! I’m Emma from mmmEnglish and in this lesson, I’m going to share with you 10 English words that you’re probably mispronouncing! If you are learning to speak English, then pronunciation is probably one of the biggest frustrations that you have right now and these words that I’ve chosen are difficult because of the combination of letters or sounds in English. Together they can be quite difficult or your eyes can, in fact, play tricks on you because the letters that you see, they don’t sound like you think they should and some of these words are even difficult for native English speakers to pronounce! But don’t worry about it, don’t sweat, we are going to fix these pronunciation problems right here, right now in this lesson! Let’s get started! OK the first word is ‘vegetable’ ‘vegetable’. Now this word is a challenge because it looks like there should be four syllables in this word. ‘Vegetable’. But there’s not, there are three syllables, ‘vegetable’.

Can you see the syllable – that we completely forget the ‘e’? ‘Vegetable’. We don’t pronounce that second syllable. ‘Vegetable’, ‘vegetable’. Fantastic! I’m going to the market to get some vegetables for dinner. ‘Comfortable’. Now this word, just like ‘vegetable’, has an extra vowel in there that we don’t need to pronounce. ‘Comfortable’, not ‘comfortable’ or ‘comfortable’ but ‘comfort- -able’. ‘Comfortable’. You skip that vowel sound. ‘Comfortable’. You look very comfortable this afternoon. ‘Almond’. Now in this word the ‘L’ is silent. It’s not ‘almond’ or ‘almond’ it’s ‘al- -mond’, ‘almond’, ‘almond’, ‘almond’. I’m going to make an almond cake for dessert. Now there are lots of other English words that have a silent letter ‘L’ in them – words like ‘salmon’, not ‘salmon’, ‘half’, not ‘half’, ‘would’, ‘talk’, ‘walk’. All of these words have a silent ‘L’ in them, which makes them a little bit tricky to pronounce correctly. I’ve got a separate video that is all about silent letters in English words and I talk about the letter ‘L’ and lots of other silent letters in that video. You can check it out up here at the end of this video! OK, what about this one? How many times have you been asked to read a paragraph out aloud in front of the class and you’ve been reading and then you come across this and you think, ‘How on earth am I going to say that?!’ Lots of native English speakers actually mess this up as well and they’ll pronounce X-cetera or X-cetera and it should be pronounced ‘et cetera’, ‘et cetera’, ‘et cetera’.

Or ‘et cetera’, if you’re like me. OK this one is especially difficult! ‘Clothes’, ‘clothes’, ‘clothes’. Now the reason why it’s especially difficult is because of the two final consonant sounds, the ‘-th’ and the plural sound. Now this noun is of course, always plural. Clothes refers to shirts, shorts, trousers, jumpers, jackets – anything that you wear is your clothes, are your clothes! But ‘clothes’, ‘clothes’ not ‘cloths’, not ‘close’ and not ‘clothes’ either! The difficult thing about the pronunciation of this word is the two consonant sounds. together. Both of those sounds are voiced consonant sounds so the sound is made here in your vocal cords. Now the thing to remember that’s really important is with that ‘-th’ sound you need to bring your teeth through – your tongue through your teeth! Now the ‘-th’ sound is very, very soft. It is definitely still there, it needs to sound different from the verb ‘close’. OK, which doesn’t have the ‘-th’ sound. This word has the ‘-th’ sound, ‘clothes’, ‘clothes’. It’s very short but it’s definitely there! I need to pack my clothes tonight because we leave early in the morning.

I need to pack my clothes tonight. ‘Jewellery’, ‘jewellery’, ‘jewellery’. Again, we’ve got an extra vowel here that we don’t need to pronounce. We don’t say ‘jewellery’, ‘jewellery’. It’s just ‘jewellery’ and actually in American English the spelling is slightly different to the British and the Australian version. And the American version should help you to pronounce this word more correctly. ‘Jewelry’, ‘jewelry’, so that’s gold, silver, pearls, diamonds, earrings, rings, necklaces – all of these things that we wear to make ourselves look more beautiful! I don’t wear a lot of jewellery myself. The only jewellery I wear is this ring and sometimes some earrings. ‘Architecture’, ‘architecture’. This one is so often mispronounced! I hear ‘architecture’, ‘architecture’, – which is incorrect! The ‘-ch’ sound in this word is a sound like in ‘cat’. ‘Architecture’, ‘architect’. ‘Architect’. It’s not the same ‘-ch’ sound that you hear in words like ‘chocolate’ and ‘cheese’, it’s a sound and there are quite a few English words that actually have this same pronunciation of the ‘-ch’ combination – words like ‘stomach’ and ‘ache’. The ‘-ch’ in all of these words is pronounced like a sound. My brother is an architect.

He went home early because he had a stomach ache. ‘Enthusiastic’, not ‘enthusiastic’ or ‘enthusiastic’, but ‘enthusiastic’. You have to work harder to get this one correct! So many of my students say “This one is too hard! I’m just not going to use this word!” and I say “NO, we are going to get it right, right now, together here in this lesson!” ‘Enthusiastic’. So what you need to do is break down this word. Start with the first syllable, Where is your tongue? What’s it doing on that final consonant sound? It’s at the top of your mouth and the ‘n’ sound is made back in the soft palate – it’s a nasal sound and to move to the ‘-th’ sound, you need to of course, bring your tongue down and out through your teeth. The tongue must come out through the middle of your teeth! If you don’t, you will mispronounce this word and you’ll say ‘enthusiastic’ or ‘enthusiastic’ instead.

You need to say See how I’m breaking that down for you? ‘Enthusiastic’, ‘enthusiastic’. Now you’re going to be enthusiastic about using that word! ‘Word’, ‘world’. and ‘work’. Now you’re probably mispronouncing these words because you are looking at the ‘-or’ and you’re trying to pronounce the vowel sound ‘or’, like in ‘door’. But this is incorrect, the vowel sound is actually as in ‘her’. ‘Work’, ‘world’, ‘word’. This is your eyes playing tricks on you! Your eyes are seeing these words, seeing the letters O and R and they’re telling you to pronounce ‘or’ but, in fact, you should be pronouncing for all of these words! ‘Word’. ‘World. ‘Work’. If you pronounce ‘or’, especially for this last one, ‘work’, it actually sounds a lot like the English word, ‘walk’. ‘Photograph’. Now perhaps you can pronounce this word correctly, ‘photograph’, but what about all of the other words in this word family? ‘Photography’, ‘photographer’, ‘photographic’. When my students mispronounce these words, it’s usually because they are stressing the wrong syllable. English words that have more than one syllable always have one strong stressed syllable.

Sometimes there are secondary syllables but there is always one main stressed syllable that is clearer and stronger than the others and the unstressed syllable – the syllable that’s not stressed – is often reduced down to a schwa vowel sound. Now the schwa sound is the lazier sound in English. That’s the schwa sound, it’s the laziest vowel sound in English. And these stress patterns are exactly what is different about the pronunciation of these words, so in the first example, ‘photograph’, the first syllable is the stressed syllable. You can hear it very clearly, ‘photograph’.

The second syllable is unstressed and it is reduced down to the schwa sound. ‘Photograph’, ‘photograph’, it’s very short, it’s very lazy, it’s not very strong at all. Now if you look at the second example, ‘photography’, you can hear the pronunciation is different and that’s because the second syllable is the stressed syllable in this word. ‘Photography’. ‘Photography’. Compare it to the first syllable where the schwa sound is – it reduces down to the schwa sound and you just hear ‘photography’.

‘Photographer’. The third example ‘photographic’, the stress is on the third syllable, so you can hear how much influence stress has on this word family. To correctly pronounce all of these words correctly you need to pay attention to the stressed syllable and that’s true for a whole range of different word families. ‘Economic’, ‘analyze’, ‘nature, ‘politics’, all of these words and their word families are influenced by stress in different ways. Well that’s my official list of the words that you are probably mispronouncing and I didn’t just make that list up, I built that list over years and years of coaching English students to improve their English pronunciation. They’re the words that students consistently get wrong! Many different students, many different times, they are the ones that are the most difficult for you to pronounce. I hope that you enjoyed this lesson, if you did make sure you subscribe by clicking the red button here. I mentioned a video about silent letters earlier in this lesson, you can watch it here and you can also watch my imitation lessons right here and those lessons are fantastic for improving your English pronunciation and expression by speaking with a native English speaker.

Thanks for watching and I will see you in the next lesson. Bye for now!.

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Learn English with Ed Sheeran ‘Perfect’ | Lyrics

 

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Learn English Words – DULCET – Meaning, Vocabulary with Pictures and Examples

Dulcet comforting and sweet It does not take long for the baby to be comforted by his mother’s dulcet singing. Last night I fell asleep listening to the dulcet sounds of soft jazz. The candles and the piano player’s dulcet music made the restaurant appear very romantic. By eight o’clock, the sounds of traffic were drowning out the dulcet bird chirps. Unlike my teenage son who enjoys rock music, I prefer the dulcet tones of instrumental tunes. Dulcet comforting and sweet Dulcet comforting and sweet Dulcet comforting and sweet.

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2 NEW ways to study English: Start in October 2017

Hello everyone! October promises to be an exciting month for learning English. First, please remember that for a limited time I’m able to offer 500 of my viewers a very big discount on my Oxford English. If you haven’t heard my full announcement, please click on the link to learn more. My Oxford English is a self-study course designed by Oxford University Press. It’s aligned with the CEFR, and it’s an amazing learning opportunity for those who are serious about studying daily in order to boost their English proficiency level. With my link you can purchase one level (that’s two modules) of the My Oxford English course. Normally, it’s $478. But my link allows you to access the course for only $269. You get a savings of over 40%. That’s $269 for 100 hours of online study. The course covers all skills at all levels, and it’s a top quality course To those who’ve already made the purchase, thank you and good luck with your studies.

For others, there’s still time visit the information page to learn more and buy this special deal Once 500 have been bought, the deal is over. Some of you learned about the contest. Yes, I’ll be announcing the winners on Facebook on October 20th. Again watch the full announcement to learn about My Oxford English, the deal to get one full level, and the contest to win a single module. Second I’m sharing another learning opportunity. Some of you may not be ready to make a daily commitment for up to six months, but you’re still looking for a structured course. Let me tell you about a new way to study on Simor.org.

This announcement is for intermediate students who’d like to work on their listening skills with me. For the past week I’ve been telling you on social media that something special is coming to Simor. Well, it’s here! Enrollment is now open for a 4-week course called Intermediate Dictations for Debate. We’ll focus on listening comprehension, but you’ll also get vocabulary and writing practice. Do you know what a dictation is? That’s when I read and you write what you hear. And a debate? That’s a discussion that looks at two opposing viewpoints. The course will run from October 9th to November 3rd. In this four-week course you’ll have a total of eight short dictations. That’s two dictations a week When I post a dictation you’ll have 24 hours to post what you hear These short dictations will develop your listening skills, and the process of writing will strengthen your understanding of grammar and vocabulary. I’ll explain and review key vocabulary for each topic.

I’ll ask you to complete one vocabulary exercise each week. My listening tasks will also get you thinking more in English. Each recording will present a view that you may or may not agree with. By the end of the week you’ll be ready to share your opinion on the topic. That’s when we’ll really have fun because we can debate the issue on our private discussion board. I won’t be providing detailed feedback on each individual post, but there will be teacher feedback and you will have interaction with your classmates. Topics include: Should education be free? Should professional athletes earn over a million dollars? Note there are no live classes for this course because Simor.org is not a video conference site. It’s set up to be a media rich discussion board. This means you can easily fit the coursework into your busy day.

You complete the tasks when it’s convenient for you. There is a one-time fee that students must pay to access the course materials in my private room on Simor. For only $10 you get 8 dictations, 4 vocabulary exercises, and 4 opportunities to engage in a debate with other English language learners. For 4 weeks, you’ll have my guidance and my feedback The goal is to increase your ability to understand spoken English and give you vocabulary and writing practice. Here’s how you enroll. First, sign up on Simor if you haven’t already. Remember you can use your Facebook or LinkedIn account. Second, go to my profile page and choose to follow me.

This means you’ll get notification of all my public posts. Finally, click on the course title Jennifer’s intermediate dictations for debate or just use this URL. Remember you have to make the one-time payment of $10 to access the course. Once you’ve registered for the course, you’ll receive notification of all new posts. Course information and instructions on how to enroll are in the video description along with the link to Simor. I’m really excited to offer you a new way to study on Simor.org. I look forward to welcoming many of you in my first private room there See you on October 9th for Intermediate Dictations for Debate. As always, thanks for watching and happy studies. You.

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Speak English Naturally – Learn To Think In English.

Learning to think in English will make you more confident speaking English because you’ll speak more naturally and fluently with less hesitation. I can already hear you saying “But Emma, I need to think in my native language to translate! It’s too hard, I don’t know enough vocabulary to do it!” But listen, that is the long, slow and painful road to English fluency.

When you do this, your English sounds unnatural because the sentence structure is different in your language and it probably takes you a long time to say what you need to say because you’re translating in your head as you speak. We’re going to learn a few strategies to help train your brain to think in English. So start with very simple vocabulary. When you’re at home, think about the English word for things that you see around you. Shoes, flowers, desk, door. When you’re on the train or you’re driving to work, look out the window and think of the English word for the things that you see. Dog, factory, busy, windy, people. In fact, we’re going to try it right now! So, I want you to close your eyes, take a deep breath.

Because when you open your eyes you’re going to look around the room in front of you and think in English – only in English – not in your native language. You’re going to think in English of the words for everything that you see around you. Okay, so take that deep breath again. And open your eyes and look around you. Thinking of the English words only. Great! Now, if that was easy, we can move on to the next level. If it was hard that’s okay too! But you’ll need to practise every day doing the same thing in different places – it will become easier.

You’re training yourself to think in English. So you can do it at home or at work, on the train or when you’re at the cafe waiting for a friend. Then you can move on to simple sentences. For example, your hair’s really long or what’s he eating for lunch? Or that chair looks really uncomfortable. So do the same thing now. I want you to look around the room and make three simple sentences about what you see. Remember, no translating! You’re not allowed to think in your native language at all. And if this is too difficult, go back to thinking of simple vocabulary words. Okay, so close your eyes, take a deep breath, go. Okay, if that was easy, you can move to the next level which is to plan your day in English – thinking in English. So when you wake up in the morning and you’re still lying in bed, think about everything that you need to do that day – in English.

After I eat breakfast I’ll walk to the bus stop and I’ll catch the bus to work. On the bus, I’m going to read my book. I’m meeting Matilda for lunch today and I think we’re going to get takeaway and eat it in the park. It’s going to be such a nice day. So when thinking in English sentences and planning your day with simple sentences becomes easy, move on to thinking in conversation. Now, this is great when you’re sunbaking on the beach or hiking up a mountain or you’re in the shower getting ready for your day and you have some time alone in your head. So there’s nothing to distract you! Now thinking in conversation is really great because you’re asking the questions then thinking of answers to those same questions and also ways to keep the conversation going, so it’s really great conversation practice.

Now, if talking to yourself in your head sounds strange or silly… well I guess it probably is! Get one of your friends to help. And no, I don’t mean ask one of your friends to have a shower with you, that would get maybe a little bit weird and awkward. You might not have the same relationship again after that. I just mean, imagine that they are part of the conversation in your head, so when you’re asking the questions, how would they answer? What would they think about the things you’re saying? As you’re walking down the street, in your head you could be saying “It’s so hot today, isn’t it?” “Yeah it is! I wish I brought my hat, that sun is scorching! It reminds me of a week that I spent in Dubai actually.

It was over 40 degrees Celsius!” “Hey are you sure that Sally’s meeting us here? We’ve been waiting for so long now!” Practising this skill and doing it regularly will help train your brain to think in English. I recommend that you find a time in your day where you always do this every day. So for example, every morning after you brush your teeth, spend five minutes thinking in conversation or planning your day.

Or it could be on your lunch break. Work on it every day and you will make it happen! You will train your brain to think in English so that when it comes to speaking in English, it flows naturally. Your words flow naturally because you’re not translating in your head. You’re thinking in English. Now, there’s heaps more videos to watch on my YouTube channel and if you sign up for my emails on my website, you’ll get five free pronunciation lessons so visit www.mmmenglish.com/signup See you soon!

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