Study English – Series 2, Episode 17: Naturopathic Medicine

{“en”:”Hello. I’m Margot Politis. Welcome to Study English, IELTS preparation. Today on Study English, you’ll have the chance to practice your reading comprehension skills. These are important skills, not just for the IELTS reading test, but for general academic studies as well. Today, we’ll focus on the skills you need to answer the range of question types in the IELTS reading test. Let’s begin by taking a look at the text. So there’s our comprehension piece. It seems quite long. But let’s start at the beginning. Read the title. We know that the passage is about naturopathic medicine. Do you know anything about the subject? You know the word medicine, but maybe not naturopathic.

It’s OK if you don’t. You don’t need to understand every word. We can probably figure out the meaning by paying attention to the context the word is used in, or by looking closely at the parts of the word. We know that naturopathic is an adjective, because it qualifies medicine. Now, let’s break naturopathic down. The first part naturo- sounds like nature.

The ending is the suffix -ic. Do you know other words that end in -ic? How about photographic or historic? The suffix -ic means relating to or of. So we could guess that naturopathic means something like relating to nature. Then we can guess that the meaning of naturopathic medicine is something like medicine that heals in a natural way. Can you think of any words you know that might belong to this subject? How about: herbs plants health healing or disease Let’s look at the text again. After you’ve looked at the heading, look for some other clues as to what it is about.

Are there any illustrations or diagrams? What’s the layout like? All these things will help your understanding of the subject. What kind of text do you think this is? It doesn’t look like a newspaper article or an instruction manual. It’s not an advertisement or a timetable. It’s probably an article from a journal. We can tell by the style, the subject and the way it looks. Did you notice the asterisk near the end of the text? When an asterisk is used like this, extra information or explanation is given at the bottom of the page. What we’ve just done is to use the skills of previewing and predicting. We put together all the information we could about the text we are reading.

We looked for a title, a diagram or any other information set apart – like the asterisk at the end of the text. We also made some educated guesses about what is in the article, by predicting some common words we might expect to see. Previewing and predicting before you start reading can help you process information quickly, because you know what to expect. It can also help you to follow the author’s ideas better, because you’ve prepared yourself for the text before reading it. Let’s get back to the text. How is it organised? It’s divided into paragraphs. Here, we have 2 paragraphs: paragraph A and paragraph B. Usually, a reading passage would have an introductory paragraph, several body paragraphs and a conclusion. Each paragraph should have a topic sentence. The topic sentence will give the main idea or subject of a paragraph. The skill of skimming involves reading over a paragraph very quickly to get a general sense of what it is about.

When you skim a text, you just want to get a general idea of the content. You’re not trying to read every word. If you just read the first and last sentences, you can often get a good idea of the main subject of the paragraph. Let’s try with paragraph A. Naturopathic Medicine Since the earliest beginnings, every known culture has been treating disease with natural therapies. So what is the main subject of paragraph A? Well we read about: the early beginnings of cultures types of natural therapies and cultures and natural therapies Can you choose which one of these things tells us what the text is about most accurately? Number one talks about beginnings of cultures. The text is probably not about that. It’s a bit too broad to be the topic sentence. So you might think it’s number 2 – types of natural therapies. This choice is too narrow. The text is about more than just natural therapies.

It’s number 3 that covers the idea of the whole paragraph. It is about cultures and natural therapies. This is what the topic sentence is expressing. You will be tested on your understanding of main ideas, so it’s a good idea to practice matching headings to paragraphs. When you need to look for specific information, like a name, date or place, you can scan a text. When you scan, your eyes move across the page very quickly looking for specific information. You can then skip over less important words. Let’s try to scan over the text to find answers to some short answer questions. Here’s our question: The early books of which countries mention natural healing methods? We’re going to scan the text, looking for the key words. The first known medical books of China, India and Greece all mention formulas used in healing. So we can answer by writing: China, India and Greece Let’s try another short answer question. Who was the father of Western Medicine? Here are the key words. Let’s scan the text. Hippocrates is the father of Western Medicine.

You can also use these skills when you need to answer multiple-choice questions, label a diagram or complete a table. Let’s take a quick look back over the skills we’ve used today: We looked at using previewing skills to predict what the text was going to be about. We talked about looking at the title, diagrams and style of the layout for clues to what the text might be about. We practised predicting the topic and guessing vocabulary that might be in the text. Next, we practiced skimming to find the topic sentence of the paragraph. Finally, we talked about scanning for keywords. And that’s all for today, but you can try out these skills and more on the Study English website. I’ll see you next time. Bye bye.. “}

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Neuro Linguistic Programming in Brighton

Study English – Series 3, Episode 2: Writing Task Response

{“en”:”Hello, and welcome to Study English, IELTS preparation. I’m Margot Politis. Today we’ll look at the Writing Task in the essay section of both the general and academic IELTS tests. IELTS essay topics are of general interest and relate to current issues in society. You can expect to be asked about: The media, education, environment, health, communication, technology and society. Being familiar with issues in these general areas is important. Listening to English language media will help you develop a bank of ideas on topics like this. An issue in health could be about children eating too much and not exercising enough. You could be asked to discuss a statement such as: Children’s eating habits and lifestyles today are more likely to be harmful than beneficial. You should know the essay instructions. These tell you how much time you have and how much you need to write. You are instructed to spend about 40 minutes writing the essay, which has to be at least 250 words.

With practice you’ll know without counting what your 250 words look like. You will also be asked to give reasons for your answer and include any relevant examples from your knowledge or experience. This is one of the instructions, so you need to follow it. Reasons are saying why you think something is true or not. You could write: An increasing number of children are becoming obese because they are eating too much junk food. Reasons are supported by examples, like this: For example, aggressive marketing of such foods towards children is one of the contributing factors. Relevant examples are examples like this that are clearly connected to the question. Now let’s look at an essay question, and how to analyse it before you write your answer. How well you do this will help with your task response, which is one of the criteria used to assess the essay. Let’s look at a question topic. Here’s a typical statement: The ageing populations of more developed countries are going to cause social and economic problems for society in the future, especially for the younger generation.

With this is something called the question task: To what extent do you agree or disagree with this statement? The essay question is always presented in this way as a statement followed by the question task. First, let’s look at the statement. Read it carefully. The ageing populations of more developed countries are going to cause social and economic problems for society in the future, especially for the younger generation. You should ask yourself ‘who or what must I write about?’ Here, you have to say something about ageing populations, developed countries, society in the future and the younger generation. Highlight these and any other key phrases, such as ’cause social and economic problems’. Think about what these phrases mean. Thinking of synonyms or words that mean something similar can help you do this. And you will need these synonyms later in your essay. Synonyms for ageing populations are: the elderly, retired people, the aged and pensioners.

They’re the people living longer or ageing. Developed countries – refers to modern industrial societies that have to financially support retired people. Synonyms are: western countries, first world countries and advanced economies. Social and economic problems are two kinds of problems. Social problems are problems that affect people, perhaps in areas such as health and education. Economic problems are problems to do with the economy of a country and its ability to pay for the services it provides. Society in the future means the country or nation or state in the future. And the younger generation are younger people or people who work. They’re the people who are not yet part of the ageing population. So you can rephrase or paraphrase the question like this: The younger generation will experience social and economic difficulties because people are living longer. The next thing to look at is the question task: To what extent do you agree or disagree with this statement? ‘To what extent’ means by how much. Here you’re being asked to give your opinion about the statement. You might agree with it or you might think it is wrong.

It’s a good idea to reword this type of question into a ‘yes/no’ question like this: Do you agree that the younger generation will experience social and economic difficulties because people are living longer? Yes or no? You could think, yes, I agree completely or perhaps yes, I agree with some of this, but disagree with other parts of it. But keep in mind that asking how much you agree or disagree tests your ability to look at 2 sides of an issue and present a balanced argument. Even if you say yes and agree completely, you still have to look at the other side of the argument and think about why someone would disagree. You would need to write two body paragraphs in an essay of this type, one saying what you agree with and one saying what you disagree with. In the conclusion of your essay you would state your position on the topic.

Let’s look at another question. Internet access should be under government control to avoid any potential harm to children. Who or what must you write about? The internet, government and children. Now highlight other key phrases – under government control, avoid any potential harm. Let’s think of synonyms. We know what the internet is, but what other words can we use? – the net, the web, online, cyberspace.

Under government control means controlled by the government. Other words for government are the state or the administration. Potential harm means bad things that might happen. Synonyms for potential are possible or likely. And other words for harm are: damage and hurt. So we could paraphrase this statement as: The state should control access to the web to avoid possible damage to children. The same question task we looked at earlier can be used: To what extent do you agree or disagree with this statement? You are being asked for your opinion. What you need to do here is say what you think.

The state should control access to the web to avoid possible damage to children. Yes or no? Now you should think about reasons for your point of view and why you don’t agree with the opposite view. So, to recap. The way you respond to the question and the instructions is part of what you are being marked on. The examiners call it task response. Make sure you follow the instructions and write the correct number of words.

That’s all for now. Don’t forget to visit our website at: australianetwork.com/studyenglish for more. I’ll see you next time on Study English.. “}

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Hypnotherapy in Brighton

Study English – Series 2, Episode 6: Lasers

{“en”:”Hello. I’m Margot Politis. Welcome to Study English, IELTS preparation. Today we’re going to learn about lasers – what are they, and how they work. We’ll also practice structuring a description of how something works, and we’ll work on our vocabulary for describing colours. Let’s begin by listening to Imogen Jubb talk about the history and the science of lasers. Lasers are used in all sorts of settings like welding, cutting, surgery, communications, reading bar codes at the supermarket or reading the information stored on a CD or DVD. There are many types of lasers but they all have 3 main parts to them. They all have an energy source, such as a lamp, some sort of feedback mechanism, like this pair of mirrors, and also some medium, like the ruby crystal, which can amplify the light. Now the first laser was built in the 1960s. It was made from a ruby crystal, some lamps and 2 mirrors, one on either side of the crystal.

I’ve got a sort of model of it here. The lamp shines white light onto the crystal, which is represented by this tube. Pumping energy into the crystal actually gives off light at a particular frequency to produce a particular colour. Some of this light bounces backwards and forwards between the two mirrors, and passes through the crystal each time. Each time the light goes through the crystal, it gets amplified, stimulating the same energy release in other parts of the crystal. So after many times in between the two mirrors, and many reflections passing through the crystal, you end up with a very strong, narrow beam of light that is just one colour.

One of the mirrors is only partially reflective, so some light passes out as the laser beam. Before Imogen explains the laser to us, she starts with an ‘introduction’, or ‘orientation’. That way, we know what to focus on. If you’re describing a device or a tool, it’s a good idea to introduce it by naming it and describing what it’s used for. This is useful in spoken English, and it’s also a good way to begin if you are writing in formal English. Listen to how Imogen introduces the laser. Lasers are used in all sorts of settings like welding, cutting, surgery, communications, reading bar codes at the supermarket or reading the information stored on a CD or DVD. She talks about the function of the laser and lists a few of the things we use lasers for today. In formal writing, if you were to introduce a discussion of lasers, you could structure your opening paragraph in a few ways.

One idea would be to start like this: A laser is a device designed to intensify a beam of light. Or, you might choose to write: The diagram is of a laser designed to scan barcodes. But Imogen chooses to begin by telling us what lasers are used for. She begins: Lasers are used in all sorts of settings. In your introduction, you could give some background about the device. Once the device has been introduced, you can talk about it in more detail. Let’s listen to Imogen describe the parts of the laser. How many parts are there and what are they? There are many types of lasers but they all have 3 main parts to them.

They all have an energy source, such as a lamp, some sort of feedback mechanism, like this pair of mirrors, and also some medium, like the ruby crystal, which can amplify the light. She talks about three main parts. All lasers have: an energy source, a feedback mechanism, and a medium to amplify light. In formal writing, we could structure this information in a number of ways. We might say that: A laser consists of a number of parts. Or: All lasers are comprised of three parts. Both of these sentences are structured to include a subject, a verb, and an object. You would then follow with a list or another sentence detailing exactly what the three parts are, in order: These are the energy source, the feedback mechanism and, finally, a medium to amplify the light. Imogen then explains how each part of the device functions.

Let’s listen as she describes each part. The lamp shines white light onto the crystal, which is represented by this tube. Pumping energy into the crystal actually gives off light at a particular frequency to produce a particular colour. Some of this light bounces backwards and forwards between the two mirrors, and passes through the crystal each time. Each time the light goes through the crystal, it gets amplified, stimulating the same energy release in other parts of the crystal. So you can see how Imogen has built up a clear image of the device. In formal written English, you might finish off by explaining the ‘purpose’ of the device. You could say: The purpose of the laser is to generate an intense beam of light. Let’s hear how Imogen finishes her description. So after many times in between the two mirrors, and many reflections passing through the crystal, you end up with a very strong, narrow beam of light that is just one colour. She finishes by talking about what the purpose of the laser is, what it produces. She says: You end up with a very strong, narrow beam of light.

So let’s review how Imogen has structured her explanation. First, there was an ‘introduction’ to the object. Imogen told us that we were talking about the laser and then gave us some background. She then moved into the ‘body of the description’. She told us that it is made up of three parts, and listed those parts. In your writing, you might write three separate ‘body paragraphs’ – one for each of the parts. Then, you’d finish off with a ‘statement of purpose’ – what the object’s overall purpose is. Now let’s finish by listening to Imogen one more time, and then we’re going to talk about colours. The lamp shines white light onto the crystal, which is represented by this tube. Pumping energy into the crystal actually gives off light at a particular frequency to produce a particular colour. When energy passes through the crystal, it gives off a particular colour of light. Light contains all the colours of the ‘spectrum’, or the ‘rainbow’. These are: red orange yellow green blue indigo violet We talk about shades of colour in different ways – most commonly by using light and dark.

For example: light blue dark blue Or sometimes we refer to nature, for example: sky blue forest green fiery red We also use precious stones to describe colour. For example: sapphire blue emerald green ruby red And that brings us to the end of Study English today. But for more information on structuring descriptions go to our website. You will find notes, exercises and quizzes to help you. Just go to abcasiapacific.com/studyenglish. And I’ll se you next time for more IETLS preparation. Bye bye.. “}

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Hypnotherapy for anxiety

Study English – Series 3, Episode 26: Giving Advice

{“en”:”Hello, and welcome to Study English, IELTS Preparation. I’m Margot Politis. What should you do to stay healthy? This is a possible question in IELTS. How might you reply to such a question – what language choices do you have? The language function required is “giving advice”. Today we’ll look at language choices in English for giving advice. First, let’s listen to someone giving advice about health: Having good health is something we all want. There are several things we should do to keep fit and healthy – eat well, exercise and get plenty of rest. If we have a good diet, lead an active life and get enough sleep, then we should stay healthy. If we get sick, then we need to manage our recovery. There is prevention, and there is cure – but prevention is better than cure.

“Prevention is better than cure”. This is a common saying that means it’s better to avoid getting sick than trying to cure the sickness later. So what does our advisor recommend we do to prevent getting ill? There are several things we should do to keep fit and healthy – eat well, exercise and get plenty of rest. If we have a good diet, lead an active life and get enough sleep, then we should stay healthy. What sort of language does she use for giving advice? First she uses the modal verb ‘should’. Listen again: There are several things we should do to keep fit and healthy – eat well, exercise and get plenty of rest. The word ‘should’ is used in a number of ways. Here it indicates advisability – there are several things we should do to keep fit. Listen to another use of should with this meaning: You should try to walk a couple of kilometres every day.

The negative form “shouldn’t” is often used to give advice about what not to do. There are three things that you shouldn’t do. You shouldn’t smoke, you shouldn’t eat too much junk food and you shouldn’t drink too much alcohol. There is another modal verb that is used in the same way as should, but is a more formal choice, ought. It’s used by this man in an interview about immigration to Australia and its impact on the environment: It’s an open question whether people are applying more strain on the environment if they’re living in a flood plain in Bangladesh than if they’re living in Australia. Secondly, I think that if you’re worried about the environmental sustainability of the pattern of economic growth in Australia – and there are good reasons why you might be – then you ought to be looking at policies to reduce, say, carbon dioxide emissions, water usage, regardless of how many foreigners you let in or don’t let in.

“You ought to be looking at policies”. You could also say you should be looking at policies. Advice is suggesting choices, so you don’t use the word must. There is no choice when you say must – it’s an obligation or something you have to do. Sometimes you need to suggest choices in a way that doesn’t upset the person you are advising. Instead of saying ‘You shouldn’t smoke’, you can express it as a question: Shouldn’t you give up smoking? A more formal way of saying this uses the word oughtn’t: Oughtn’t you give up smoking? In the next clip, listen to another way of using should: If we have a good diet, lead an active life and get enough sleep then we should stay healthy. Here, should expresses the idea that this is likely to happen if the condition – having a good diet – is met. This is called a conditional.

The negative form, shouldn’t, is used in a similar way here: In any case, lead a healthy lifestyle and you shouldn’t get sick. It is a common language feature to use conditionals when giving advice, like this: If we get sick, then we need to manage our recovery. If we get sick, then we need to manage our recovery. But you don’t always have to use ‘then’ after the ‘if’ clause: If you feel unusually sick, you need to consult a doctor. And the ‘if’ clause doesn’t need to be at the beginning of the sentence: You need to consult a doctor if you feel unusually sick. There is another structure in English using ‘should’: Should you have any questions, do not hesitate to ask. Here, should means ‘if’ – if you have any questions. It’s a polite invitation which you will often hear on planes. The cabin crew might say to passengers “Should you require any help” Now listen carefully to all the advice and concentrate on what tense is being used for the verbs: Having good health is something we all want. There are several things we should do to keep fit and healthy – eat well, exercise and get plenty of rest.

If we have a good diet, lead an active life and get enough sleep then we should stay healthy. If we get sick, then we need to manage our recovery. There is prevention, and there is cure – but prevention is better than cure. Make sure you have a balanced diet – don’t overeat and don’t eat the wrong foods. Eat plenty of fruit and vegetables for fibre, and get a good mix of proteins from fish and some meat, and reduce your intake of fatty food, sugar and salt. Exercise every day. You should try to walk a couple of kilometres daily. Playing sport, or going to the gym is an easy way to exercise your body. Exercise helps to relieve stress. You also need to rest. Health experts say we need about 8 hours sleep a night, but some people need less than this. If you feel unusually sick you need to consult a doctor. Avoid close contact with others when you are feeling unwell. Stay at home for as long as the doctor advises you. In any case, lead a healthy lifestyle and you shouldn’t get sick. Did you notice that many of the verbs were the base form, such as avoid or stay.

Listen again: Avoid close contact with others when you are feeling unwell. Stay at home for as long as the doctor advises you. In any case, lead a healthy lifestyle and you shouldn’t get sick. This is called the imperative form and it’s used for giving advice, and also to give orders. For example a teacher may say to a noisy class: Stop talking! Or Be quiet! You also use the imperative when you need to warn someone of danger: Watch out! There’s one more use for the imperative and that’s in instructions.

In the essay section of the IELTS Test you will read: ‘Write at least 250 words.’ In recipes you often see the imperative, like this: Fry the prawns. Chop the leeks. Add the noodles. The negative form of the imperative has don’t in front of it, like this: Make sure you have a balanced diet – don’t overeat and don’t eat the wrong foods. You’ll hear this structure a lot in English. You might hear people, such as parents to their children, say: Don’t forget to telephone. Or Don’t get lost. Finally, you should know the difference between the words advice and advise. Listen to the way they are used by this woman talking about generation Y or gen Y: The baby boomers still like to have face-to-face meetings. They like to chat about certain things. A gen Y would be just as happy for you to send them a text message and advise them of a change of roster at work or they’re quite happy to get advice about a new event that’s occurring by text or SMS or even an email.

Advise – spelled with an ‘s’ – is the verb form. Send them a text and advise them of a change of roster. Advice – spelled with a ‘c’ and pronounced with a shorter ‘i’ sound – advice – is the noun. They’re happy to get advice. Listen again: and advise them of a change of roster at work or they’re quite happy to get advice about a new event that’s occurring by text or SMS or even an email.

That’s all for now. For advice on the IELTS Test, visit our Study English website. We strongly advise it. Good luck with your studies. Bye.. “}

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Neuro Linguistic Programming in Brighton

Learn English | Basic English Conversation Course | 12 lessons

{“en”:”Hello. Welcome to our conversation series. These videos are for intermediate level learners of English. In these videos, we will talk about many expressions to help you communicate in English. When you watch these videos you should do 3 things to help you study. First, our teachers may say a word that you donu2019t know. Please take the time to find that word in a dictionary to help you understand the video. Second, you should always try to repeat after the teacher in the video. Whenever the teacher uses some new vocabulary or expressions, you need to repeat how they say it. Last, you should always review and re-watch the videos, and practice what you learned to help you understand the expressions being taught to you. It takes time and effort, but these videos will help you if you watch them with a sincere interest to learn English. Thank you and enjoy the videos. Hi, everybody. Iu2019m Esther and in this video, weu2019re going to talk about how to describe the cost or price of something.

Now this is important to people like me who like shopping. Rightu2026 So, for example, I like shopping, especially for dresses. So, I might say, the cost of u201cThis dress is affordable.u201d Oku2026 u201cThis dress is affordable.u201d u2018Affordableu2019 means that this dress is not too expensive. I have enough money and I can pay for this dress. I have enough money, I u2018canu2019 buy this dress. So, I would say, u201cThis dress is affordable.u201d I can also say, u201cThis dress is inexpensive.u201d We all know what u2018expensiveu2019 is, but we say u201cinexpensiveu201d, so thatu2019s the opposite. u201cInexpensive.u201d u2018Affordableu2019 and u2018inexpensiveu2019 have very similar meanings. Again, I have enough money to buy this. Itu2019s not too expensive. Then we have u201ccheapu201d. u201cThis dress is cheap.u201d Now u2018cheapu2019 is similar. It means itu2019s not expensive, but itu2019s a little bit more negative. If you say that something is u201ccheapu201d, people may think that the quality is not very good. Itu2019s not very nice.

Ok, now letu2019s look at the opposite. The opposite of these words is u201cexpensiveu201d. u201cThis dress is expensive.u201d It costs a lot of moneyu2026too much money. Maybe I donu2019t want to buy it. We can also say, u201cover-pricedu201d. u201cThis dress is over-priced.u201d That means the price is too high. So again, I donu2019t want to buy this dress. Itu2019s too expensive and over-priced. Ok, letu2019s look at some more examples together. Letu2019s look at some examples. u201cThe hat was affordable because it was on sale.u201d u201cThe hat was affordable because it was on sale.u201d Next. u201cI wish this bag was more affordable.u201d u201cI wish this bag was more affordable.u201d Next. u201cThis computer is surprisingly inexpensive.u201d u201cThis computer is surprisingly inexpensive.u201d Next. u201cThese shoes look beautiful, but they are too cheap.u201d u201cThese shoes look beautiful, but they are too cheap.u201d Next. u201cThat jacket is too expensive.u201d u201cThat jacket is too expensive.u201d And last. u201cI cannot buy this over-priced bag.u201d u201cI cannot buy this over-priced bag.u201d Ok, so in this video, we learned that when we want to describe the cost of something, as not too expensive, we say u201caffordableu201d.

Oku2026 Something is u2018affordableu2019 if itu2019s not too expensive. If I can buy it with the money I have. On the other hand, if something is not affordable, if the cost is very high, we say u201cexpensiveu201d or u201cover-pricedu201d. For me, ahhu2026I think some brands like H&M and Forever21 are affordable. Some people donu2019t think this way. They think itu2019s cheap. Uhhu2026sometimes, yes. Some of the items can be cheap. But for me, I like those brands because they are affordable. Ahhhu2026another store that I like, in Koreau2026itu2019s called Zara or uc790ub77c, in Korea as they say. Uhmu2026they have some items that are affordable and some items that are very expensive. Too expensive for me to buy. Ok, well thatu2019s what I wanted to share in this video.

Thanks for watching. Bye. Hello. Iu2019m Bill. In this video, weu2019re going to talk about something fun that people like to dou2026and thatu2019s vacation. We like to go on vacationu2026and we like to tell people about our vacations. Because, if we can make them jealous, thatu2019s even better. Now, thereu2019s two questions here that weu2019re going to use to talk about u2018vacationu2019. One question is u2018where we gou2019 for vacation. And the other question is u2018what we dou2019 when on vacation.

Now, the first question is, u201cDid you go anywhere for vacation?u201d So, vacation time is finished and itu2019s just time to talk about it. So, they ask this question. And thereu2019s different answers you can give. The easiest. u201cYes, I did.u201d But, thatu2019s boring. Easy is not always good because you want to be interesting when you talk. So, someone asks you, u201cDid you go anywhere for vacation?u201d Well, start by u2018where did you gou2019? u201cI went tou2026Busan.u201d Or u201cI went to Jeju.u201d Popular places people love to go to. Or, you could just say, u201cI went to the beach.u201du2026cause people like the beach. So, thatu2019s a place as well. Now, u201cwent tou201d is good to say. You can also go with u201cvisitedu201d. And again, just u2018what place did you visitu2019? We have, u201cI visited Halla Mountain.u201d Oru2026 u201cI visited Haeundai Beach.u201d Those are all good places to visit. But now, sometimes you canu2019t go on vacation.

Something stops you from going on vacation. And, if that happens, you can use this phrase. We have, u201cNo, I had tou2026u201d And we say, u201cI had tou2026u201d because that means something stopped you. So now, it could be, u201cNo, I had to work.u201d Ughu2026 Oru2026 u201cNo, I had to save money.u201d Because if you need to save money, vacation is not a good idea. Now, letu2019s look at some more examples of using these.

The question wasu2026 u201cDid you go anywhere on vacation this year?u201d Answers can beu2026 u201cI went to the U.S.A.u201d Oru2026 u201cI visited Beijing.u201d Oru2026 u201cI was too busy to go anywhere.u201d Ok, now that we talked about u2018where we gou2019 for vacation, weu2019re going to talk about u2018what we dou2019 when weu2019re on vacation. Alrightu2026 And so, when that happens, we have this question here: u201cWhat did you do on vacation?u201d Because we go somewhere, but now we have to do something. Now, the answers are notu2026like before, with the u201cI went tou2026u201d, u201cI visitedu201d.

Alrightu2026 You got to think a little more, but itu2019s still easy. You start with u2018Iu2019, of course. But now, u2018doing somethingu2019, you need a verb. So, you have to use u2018past tenseu2019 verb, because vacation, itu2019s finished. So you have to say things like, u201cI swamu2026at the beach.u201d Or, u201cI swam in a pool.u201d Somethingu2026something like, u201cI hiked on a mountain.u201d Alrightu2026 Just fill in what you were doing. Oku2026 Now, some people, when they go on vacation, they donu2019t like to do many things. For some, vacation is about being lazy. So some people may just say, u201cAhhh, vacation, I just rested.u201d Thatu2019s time to relax. Time to feel good again. Oku2026 Letu2019s take a look at some more examples of these. Now, this questions isu2026 u201cWhat did you do during your vacation?u201d You can sayu2026 u201cI swam at the beach.u201d Or maybeu2026 u201cI rode a boat to Jeju.u201d Oru2026 u201cI just relaxed and read a lot.u201d Ok, so there you have two good and easy questions about vacations.

You have the u201cDid you go anywhere for vacation?u201d, and then the u201cWhat did you do on vacation?u201d. Now, good to ask these questions to people, but itu2019s better to answer the questions because that means you had vacation. So, I hope you can talk about vacations and I hope you get to take many vacations yourself. Alright, see you next time. Thank you. Uhh, Hi. Iu2019m Bill and what I have for you right now are three questions you can ask a foreigner about their country. Because, I know this. People like to talk about where theyu2019re from. Itu2019s easy and itu2019s comfortable for us to do. Now, the first question we have here is this: u201cWhat is the food like in your country?u201d Now, many Korean peopleu2026they say, u201cOur food is spicy.u201d But now, some countries, they donu2019t eat a lot of spicy food. So, sometimes, they might say, u201cOur food is sweet.u201d Or even, they might answer, how do they make the food.

Something like, u201cOur food is grilled.u201d Or, u201cOur food is fried.u201d This is all possible answers. Now, another thing is about the foodu2026is they could talk about what food is popular. Oku2026 Now, just like this: u201cWe eat a lot ofu2026u201d Now, I know from living in Korea, in Korea, u201cWe eat a lot of kimchi.u201d Alright, itu2019s true. Everydayu2026even me. But now, other countries maybe, like America, u201cWe eat a lot of beef.u201d Itu2019s very popular. Oku2026 Andu2026almostu2026not every day, but almostu2026it seems like that happens. Or even, u201cWe eat a lot of eggs.u201d Just u2018what do you eat a lot of?u2019 Ok, letu2019s look at next question. Alright, now here is another question you can ask a foreigner about their country.

And it goes like this. u201cWhat is your country famous for?u201d This is just about what is popular in their country. What do people do? What do people know about? Oku2026 So now, Iu2019m an American, so if someone were to ask me u201cWhat is America famous for?u201d I could just answer like this: u201cMany people know Hollywood.u201d Ya, Hollywood, where America makes the movies. Oku2026 You can say, u201cMany people know Hollywood.u201d Or, itu2019s ok. u201cItu2019s famous for Hollywood.u201d Oku2026 Now, by u2018itu2019, I mean u2018my countryu2019. So, my country, u2018itu2019su2019 famous for Hollywood. We want to change it a bitu2026 We can talk about Canada.

u201cWhat is Canada famous for?u201d Well, thatu2019s easy, we could do, u201cMany people know maple syrup.u201d Very tastyu2026Canadian food. And also, u201citu2019s famous for maple syrup.u201d Oku2026 So, these are two things that are equal that you can use to answer this question. Ok, letu2019s look at the last question, now. Alright, now, hereu2019s our last question that will help you get a foreigner to tell you about their home country. And, it just goes like this: u201cWhat is there to see in your country?u201d Kind of what is famous, again, but something to see. Something to go see at. Oku2026 So now, what we have here isu2026the answer can gou2026 u201cPeople come to seeu2026u201d Now, if the person is form France, the easy answer is: u201cPeople come to see Eiffel tower.u201d Or someone from China.

u201cPeople come to see the Great Wall.u201d Or again, maybe a Japanese person is visiting. They can say, u201cPeople come to see Mount Fuji.u201d Now again, if you travel to another country and someone asks you about Korea, you can just say, u201cPeople come to see Seoul.u201d Or, u201cPeople come to see Kyeongbuk Palace.u201d The famous things to see. Alright, letu2019s take a look at some examples. Question one. u201cWhat is the food like in your country?u2019 u201cWe eat a lot of vegetables.u201d u201cOur food is mostly fired.u201d u201cWe donu2019t eat much fruit.u201d u201cWhat is your country famous for?u201d u201cItu2019s famous for ice hockey.u201d u201cMany people know about our mountains.u201d u201cItu2019s famous for beautiful beaches.u201d u201cWhat is there to see in your country?u201d u201cPeople come to see our old castles.u201d u201cPeople come to see our historical places.u201d u201cPeople come to see our modern cities.u201d Alright, so there you have three questions that you can ask a foreigner about their country.

Itu2019s a great way to start a conversation. And itu2019s also a great way to learn something about another place. I hope this helps you and I hope you can try it soon. Thank you.. “}

As found on Youtube

Neuro Linguistic Programming in Brighton

Study English – Series 3, Episode 23: Talking About Food

{“en”:”Hello, and welcome to Study English, IELTS Preparation. I’m Margot Politis. The topic of food and the customs around preparing food come up often in the IELTS Speaking Test. It is useful to look at this topic area and think about how to select language and organise a response if you’re asked to talk about food, cooking and diet. Let’s begin by listening to someone talk about the various meals she has during the day: I usually have breakfast every morning, and lunch in the early afternoon, a sandwich usually or some instant noodles, but the main meal of the day for me is normally dinner. Let’s go over the language of meals. She mentioned breakfast, the morning meal, lunch, the meal we have in the middle of the day and dinner, which is the evening meal. So what other words are there? In the United States and Britain another word for dinner is supper. In Australia the word supper isn’t used very often and usually refers to a light meal late at night.

In Australia the other word for dinner is tea. Tea can also refer to afternoon tea or high tea, a formal English meal of small sandwiches, scones and a cup of tea. A tea break or a coffee break is a short time during the working day when people have a break with a cup of tea or coffee. Food and drink consumed between meals during the day or night are called snacks. You might hear people talk about ‘brunch’, which is a mid morning meal that combines breakfast and lunch, a bit like the Chinese yum cha. Yumcha is quite familiar to westerners these days and it would be reasonable if asked what your favourite meal is to talk about it as the speaker does here: The family usually gets together on Sunday for a traditional Chinese banquet, or yum cha, either at home or in China town, but usually I eat on my own, or have lunch at work with a colleague. So what might you be asked about meals? You might be asked what you usually have to eat for breakfast or whether you eat breakfast at all. Another common question is ‘What is the main meal of the day?’ How does the speaker answer that? I usually have breakfast every morning, and lunch in the early afternoon, a sandwich usually or some instant noodles, but the main meal of the day for me is normally dinner.

Her answer is dinner, but, as would be expected, she expands her answer to talk about other meals too. It is important to distinguish between meal and staple. Staple means the basic food most commonly eaten. For most people in Asia this is rice as it is with our speaker: Rice is the main staple in my diet. Staples in other countries are potatoes, and wheat in its various forms such as bread, pasta or couscous. When preparing for the IELTS Test, it is important to brainstorm a variety of topics and issues – to begin to develop your own ideas, and build up possible responses.

You should: think of examples think of reasons think of useful vocabulary To start you could divide the topic of food into various aspects such as: meat, fish, vegetables and herbs and spices. Cooking styles: boiling, frying and steaming. Cuisines: Italian, Indian and Japanese. Cooking utensils: pots, pans and woks. Eating utensils: plate, bowl, knife, fork, spoon, chopsticks. There are many things to say and ask about these things.

With food types, you might want to say that you don’t eat meat and that you are a vegetarian. You may even avoid eggs, milk and fish as well, in which case you are a vegan. You could be asked why people choose to be a vegetarian or a vegan. A good reason to be vegetarian is that it is a healthy diet, something our speaker is aware of: I try and have a healthy, balanced diet – not much fried, fatty food, and a good mix of fruit and vegetables. You may be asked about what healthy food is or if junk food is bad for you and why. With utensils it’s possible that you may be asked to compare chopsticks with forks with a question like: Do you prefer to eat with chopsticks or a fork? Now let’s see if you can work out what question might have prompted our speaker’s reply. Listen to the clip, and think what question might have been asked.

Rice is the main staple in my diet. I try and have a healthy, balanced diet – not much fried, fatty food, and a good mix of fruit and vegetables. Perhaps she was asked: ‘Describe what you usually eat?’ That would require describing in the answer. Or ‘What do you usually eat?’, where you would have to identify what you eat. Which question is more likely? Listen again: Rice is the main staple in my diet. I try and have a healthy, balanced diet – not much fried, fatty food, and a good mix of fruit and vegetables. She’s identified or named the things she usually eats, so the most likely question would be: ‘What do you usually eat?’ Let’s try it again. What question? Think about the language function she uses: The family usually gets together on Sunday for a traditional Chinese banquet, or yumcha, either at home or in China town, but usually I eat on my own, or have lunch at work with a colleague.

What about: ‘Is it better to eat alone or with others?’ That needs you to give an opinion. She talks about eating alone, but doesn’t say that it’s better or worse than eating with others. So that’s not right. She explains who she eats with and when, so it’s more likely to be: ‘Who do you usually eat with?’ Does the answer fit? Let’s try it. The family usually gets together on Sunday for a traditional Chinese banquet, or yumcha, either at home or in China town, but usually I eat on my own, or have lunch at work with a colleague. Let’s try one more. What might the question be? I don’t cook much.

My mother is a good cook, and can create great meals just from a wok! We have many dishes including roast duck – my favourite. What about ‘Can you cook?’ She doesn’t really say if she can or can’t. She just says she doesn’t cook much. It’s probably: ‘Who does the cooking where you live?’ I don’t cook much. My mother is a good cook, and can create great meals just from a wok! We have many dishes including roast duck – my favourite.

These questions might be asked individually in Part 1 of the Speaking Test, or joined together in Part 2. Part 2 is the long turn, where you have to talk for one to two minutes in response to a prompt card like this: Talk about what you usually eat every day. You should say: what you eat who you eat with, and who does the cooking where you live Let’s listen to the response: I usually have breakfast every morning, and lunch in the early afternoon, a sandwich usually or some instant noodles, but the main meal of the day for me is normally dinner. That often consists of some meat, maybe grilled, some steamed vegetables and rice. Rice is the main staple in my diet. I try and have a healthy, balanced diet – not much fried, fatty food, and a good mix of fruit and vegetables.

The family usually gets together on Sunday for a traditional Chinese banquet, or yumcha, either at home or in China town, but usually I eat on my own, or have lunch at work with a colleague. I don’t cook much. My mother is a good cook, and can create great meals just from a wok! We have many dishes including roast duck – my favourite. That’s all for now. To find more information about the IELTS Speaking Test, visit our Study English website. Good luck with your studies.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in Brighton

Present Simple vs Present Continuous – Learn English Tenses (Lesson 1)

{“en”:”Hello everyone and welcome to the first instalment of our grammar lessons. As I said in the introduction, we’ll be starting with the tenses And you’ve guessed right. The first two to learn are Present Simple and Present Continuous. So, I’ve made a presentation for you, and I’m going to now take you through the examples on this presentation and explain the usage of these two tenses. So by the end of this session you know exactly when to say ‘I do’ and when to say ‘I am doing’. So, Let’s go over to the presentation now.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in Brighton

English Lesson 1 – Hello. What’s your name? | English with cartoons and songs from Gogo

{“en”:”Gogo’s adventures with English. Lesson 1. My name’s Gogo. Hello. Hello. My name’s Tony. What’s your name? Name? Name? Name? My name’s Tony. What’s your name? My name’s Gogo! Tony! Tony! Hello! Hello! My name’s Gogo. What’s your name? My name’s Jenny. Hello, Gogo. How are you? How are you? I’m fine, thank you. I’m fine, thank you. How are you, Tony? I’m fine, thank you. How are you? Tony. Jenny. What’s your name? My name’s Gogo. What’s your name? My name’s Tony. How are you? I’m fine, thank you. How are you? I’m fine, thank you. What’s your name? My name’s Jenny. What’s your name? My name’s Gogo. Tony, Jenny, Gogo! Tony. Jenny. Goodbye, Gogo. Goodbye, Gogo. Goodbye, Jenny. Goodbye, Tony. My name’s Gogo. What’s your name? My name’s Gogo. What’s your name? My name’s Jeeby. My name’s Jeeby. My name’s Tapy. What’s your name? What’s your name? Your name’s Pod. Hello. My name’s Jenny. Hello. My name’s Tony. How are you? I’m fine thank you how are you? I’m fine, thank you. Who are they? Look and say.

Page 3. Unit 1: Hello! Conversation. Listen and look. Page 4. Vocabulary. Listen and say. Page 4. Target. Listen and say. Page 5. Practice 1. Listen and number. Page 5. Practice 2. Your turn! Listen and answer. Page 6. Song. Listen and sing. Page 8. Alphabet. Number 1. Listen, point and say. Page 8. Number 2. Listen and chant.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in Brighton

Study English – Series 1, Episode 22: Finance Report

{“en”:”Hello. I’m Margot Politis. Welcome to another episode of Study English, IELTS preparation. Today we’re going to listen to a finance report. It’s filled with numbers and amounts, expressed in a variety of ways. It’s important to be able to understand and describe numerical data using decimals, fractions and currencies. Listen to the day’s finance report. The Australian dollar, today Tuesday the 11th of November, continues to rise against the US dollar, buying just over 70 cents, a 15 year high. Against other currencies, however, the trend is a little different, falling against the pound, closing at 0.425, a slight drop on yesterday, and euros.

The yen is also strengthening at 71.95, and considerably higher against the greenback at 1yen. The Dow Jones Index closed today at 9809.79, a fall of on yesterday’s trading. The Sydney Stock Market doubled its trading yesterday with BHP Billiton trading heavily. The latest retail figures showed that turnover grew by 3.2% in the June quarter, the fastest quarterly growth rate for five and a half years. At the same time, unemployment fell to its lowest level in twelve and a half years. OK, first we’re going to look at decimals, and how you express them. Listen carefully again. Against other currencies, however, the trend is a little different, falling against the pound, closing at 0.425, a slight drop on yesterday, and euros. The yen is also strengthening at 71.95, and considerably higher against the greenback at 1yen. The Dow Jones Index closed today at 9809.79, a fall of on yesterday’s trading. In English, decimals are written with a point, not a comma. So we write 4.25, 6.1. When you say the numbers after the decimal point, you say them all separately, as individual numbers. So we have: seventy one point nine five forty seven point one eight nine thousand eight hundred and nine point seven nine Notice that a zero is often spoken as ‘oh’.

Practice saying these numbers: three hundred and twenty six point oh one four point eight nine seven nine hundred and two point three oh eight Listen again: Against other currencies, however, the trend is a little different, falling against the pound, closing at 0.425, a slight drop on yesterday, and euros. The yen is also strengthening at 71.95, and considerably higher against the greenback at 1yen. The Dow Jones Index closed today at 9809.79, a fall of on yesterday’s trading. The Sydney Stock Market doubled its trading yesterday with BHP Billiton trading heavily. You can hear that when using numbers, there are often alternatives, and many choices you can make. So conversationally, we would usually say one hundred and eleven point oh three, but will also often hear one hundred and eleven point zero three.

Here, we could say: zero point four two five nought point four two five or even just point four two five Notice that in North America, people usually say zero, not nought or ‘oh’. OK, now the other way of expressing numbers less than one is using fractions. Listen to the fractions here. The latest retail figures showed that turnover grew by 3.2% in the June quarter, the fastest quarterly growth rate for five and a half years. At the same time, unemployment fell to its lowest level in twelve and a half years. She uses the most common fraction – a half. Listen to how we say common fractions: a half a third a quarter two thirds five eights three quarters Notice that once you understand the pattern, you can express any fraction you want. Try these: seven eighteenths 16 thirtieths 14 fortieths OK, now listen again to some of the report. Listen for different currencies: Against other currencies, however, the trend is a little different, falling against the pound, closing at 0.425, a slight drop on yesterday, and euros. The yen is also strengthening at 71.95, and considerably higher against the greenback at 1yen.

There were a number of different currencies mentioned in that clip: the pound; the euro; the yen; the greenback. Let’s have a look at them. Lots of countries use a dollar. In Australia, the Australian dollar is usually expressed with the dollar sign. But internationally, it’s written like this AUD. We read this the Australian dollar. In United States, they use the dollar as well. It’s the USD, the United States dollar. But often called the greenback, because it’s green. In Great Britain they use the pound. It is written GBP, but it’s often called the pound sterling. In the European Union, they use the euro dollar, written like this – EUR. In Japan, it’s the yen, written JPY. In China, it’s the yuan, written CNY, and the renminbi, RMB.

Notice that we write the currency before the number, but we say it after the number. So we read: two dollars. or four pounds fifteen. Notice also how we read longer numbers: three thousand, four hundred and seventy Japanese yen one hundred and ninety two Australian dollars Notice that when spoken naturally the one often becomes ‘a’ and the ‘and’ becomes squashed. We don’t say one hundred and ninety two but a hundred n ninety two. Try this one: a hundred and twenty seven thousand, three hundred and twenty two Hong Kong dollars OK, now let’s listen to the report again, and then we’ll look at another important use of numbers. The Australian dollar, today Tuesday the 11th of November, continues to rise against the US dollar, buying just over 70 cents, a 15 year high.

Notice that she says Tuesday the 11th of November. Saying simple things like the date can be confusing in English, as the way they’re said varies. In Australia, we say the 11th of November, or November the 11th. Notice that it’s written without the words ‘the’, or ‘of’. For the 13th of February 2005, Australians would write this: 13.05.2005. But in North America, they’d write it: 02.13.2005. You’ll need to learn these to make sure you don’t turn up somewhere on the wrong day! So remember that in Australia they write the date: day dot month dot year, but in North America, they write: month dot day dot year. And there is an international standard that says the format should be: year dot month dot day. With numbers, dates, times, there are all sorts of variations. Just make sure you understand the currency, the time and the date, or you could find yourself in all sorts of trouble! And I’ll see you soon for more Study English! Bye bye.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in Brighton

Theme 2. Time – What time is it? | ESL Song & Story – Learning English for Kids

{“en”:”Theme 2 Time What time is it, dad? It’s seven o’clock. Thank you. What time is it? It’s eight. Time for breakfast. Okay. Coming. Are you ready? Yes, we’re ready. Good. Let’s go to school. Let’s go home. Please wait for me. Okay. It’s late. Time for bed. Okay. Good night, mom. Good night, dad. Good night. Four tickets, please. Mom, I’m hungry. Mom, what time is it? It’s twelve o’clock. Time for lunch! Let’s go! What time is it? Oh, my… It’s one o’clock! We’re late. Let’s hurry! What time is it now? It’s ten o’clock. What time is it there, Hana? It’s six o’clock. What time is it now? It’s ten o’clock.

What time is it there, Hana? It’s six o’clock. What time is it now? What time is it now? It’s seven o’clock, seven o’clock, seven o’clock. What time is it now, Suho? It’s four o’clock, four o’clock, four o’clock. It’s five ten. It’s five twenty. It’s five thirty. Time for homework. Let’s go home. Yes! It’s nine thirty. It’s nine forty. It’s nine fifty. Time for bed. Good night. Good night. What time is it? Itu2019s 12 ou2019clock. Time for lunch. Cinderella, lunch time. Okay. Coming! What time is it? Itu2019s 5:30. Itu2019s party time. Letu2019s go. Please wait for me. Cinderella, close your eyes. Open your eyes, please. Wow! Thanks. Youu2019re welcome. Party time, Cinderella. Time for dancing. What time is it? Itu2019s 11 ou2019clock. Oh, no! Itu2019s late. Good night! Please wait for me. This is Cinderella. Nice to meet you. Nice to meet you, too. What time is it? Itu2019s twelve ou2019clock.

What? Oh, no! Is this yours? Yes, itu2019s mine. No, itu2019s not yours. Is this yours? Yes, itu2019s mine. Oh, itu2019s yours. I love you. It’s late, Toto! Yes, Mom. Toto! What time is it? It’s nine o’clock! Oh, my~! Coni, Coni! Wake up! OK. Ahhh~ Coni! Wake up! It’s late! Ahhh~ OK, Mom. Wake up! Mom, what time is it? It’s nine o’clock. It’s late. What? Nine o’clock? Oh, no! Oh, no! What time is it? It’s twelve o’clock.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in Brighton