8 Tips for British English Pronunciation

{“en”:”Hi, everyone. I’m Jade. What we’re talking about today is some pronunciation tips for British English. Some of them are tips; some of them are observations that you might be interested to know. We’ve got eight of them, so let’s get started. Pronunciation of-ed word endings. This is not specifically a British English issue. If your preference — I don’t know why I can’t speak suddenly in an English pronunciation video, but that’s how it is. If your preference is American English, this also applies to American English. So what I hear a lot at, sort of, around intermediate level — sometimes upper intermediate level if you haven’t had someone to correct you — -ed word endings sound like this.

I can’t even do it because it’s so unnatural for me. “Excite-ed shout-ed, remind-ed.” It’s so unnatural for me. But in fact, it’s not like that. It doesn’t sound like an -ed. It might sound like an /id/; it might sound like a /t/; or it might sound like a /d/. So I’ve got some examples here. This word, even though it’s spelled -ed, makes an /id/ sound. It becomes “excited”. “I’m really excited.” “Shouted.” “He shouted at me.” “Reminded.” “I reminded you to do your homework; didn’t I?” And — yeah.

So now, we can talk about the ones that finish with a t sound. “Finished. Dripped. Laughed.” They don’t have the-ed sound. So that’s an important thing to know about pronunciation. Even if it’s spelled-ed, it doesn’t mean it sounds like that. And what about the ones that end with a d sound, a “duh” sound. “Remembered.” “I remembered what you said to me.” “Called.” “I called you. Didn’t you hear your phone?” “Imagined.” “I imagined a better future for everyone.” So with those, it’s a D sound. How do you know for each one? Go with what feels most natural when you’re saying the word.

The main thing is don’t force the -ed sound at the end of the word because it’s that that gives you an unnatural rhythm when you’re speaking English. So moving on to — this one’s an observation, really. British English pronunciation. We have so many different accents in England. But one of the biggest divisions in our accents is — it’s between the north of the country and the south, and it’s our pronunciation of these words: “bath” and “laugh”, as I say them. I say them in the southern pronunciation. But if I were from the north — if I were from the north of the country, I’d say “bath” and “laugh” because they have a different accent up there. Well, they’ve got loads of different accents, but they don’t speak in the same way as me. So let’s break it down into the actual sound. So if you’re from the North, you say, “a”. But we, in the South, say “au”. So you say “bath”, we say “bauth”. And you say “laf”; we say “laugh”. And you can also hear it in these two words. It doesn’t have to be the first or only a vowel in the word.

In the southern pronunciation, this is “commaund”. But in the northern pronunciation, it’s “command”. And the southern pronunciation of this word is “caust”. The northern pronunciation is “cast”. The cast of Brookside came to London.” “Brookside” was an old soap that’s not on TV anymore, and it was people from Liverpool. And I was just doing the accent. Probably that’s really irrelevant to you.

You will never see that show, but anyway. You know, now. Next tip. I don’t hear this that often, but when I do, it sounds really, really, really wrong. And I think this tip generally — generally a good example of how — just because we write something one way doesn’t mean we say it that way. So in English — American English, too — W sounding words are the same as the “wh” sound in words for spelling. It actually sounds the same. So we’ve got two words here, “wine” and “whine”.

One is spelled with WH, and one is just spelled with I. “Whine” is a kind of moan or a kind of cry. Sometimes, young children whine. Sometimes, women who are upset about something are said to be “whiny”. So we don’t really say that men whine. That’s probably a bit sexist. But, yeah. The point is they sound the same but are spelled differently. So I’ve sometimes heard people try to make the “wh” sound like “hwhine” or something like that or in these words, “which” and “witch” are the same. Some people might say “hwhich”. And that used to be a feature of British English. If you listen to some speakers of British English from a long time ago, like around the 1920s — T.

S. Eliot, although he wasn’t British, he did acquire a really strange British accent. And when he spoke English, he would make the “hwhich” sound. And that was a standard feature of the accent then. But if you say it now, it just sounds a bit weird. So don’t be making the “hwh” sound. And here, two commonly spoken words with that “hwh” sound that you shouldn’t say — so you should say “what” without “hwhat, hwhat, hwhat do you want?” That would be awful.

And “hwhere” — don’t say that. Just say it without the H sound. Let’s take a look at the pronunciation of -ing word endings. So in just relaxed, informal speech, I feel that a lot of dialects don’t pronounce the G. So it would be like this. “I was listening to some music.” You don’t hear the G there. But if we’re making an effort to speak properly and with very good enunciation, you would hear the G slightly. It would sound like this, “I was listening to a wonderful lecture yesterday.” And you hear my G. It’s very soft, but it’s there. Something to say about British English pronunciation is — again, this is a north-south difference — is that they, up there, some of the accents ring the G, so it’s, like, “listening, speaking.

I was speaking to him.” And if that’s a feature of your accent, that’s a feature of your accent. But in standard English, you don’t ring it. You don’t make an extra “guh” or “juh” sound at the end. So the standard way to make the G sound, “reading.” But I’m just letting you know that in relaxed and informal speech, many times, we don’t hear the G. So when we come back we’ll look at the other four rules or tips — tips, really. Tips and observations about pronunciation. Tip No. 5, when we’re saying a word with two or more syllables, very often, the second syllable is not stressed, and it’s what we call a “schwa”. So even though all these words have a different spelling for the second syllable, they become a schwa.

So what some people do is they’ll say the word. And a good example is this word. They will say “En-gland”. But actually, it sounds like this “England”. So the vowel changes to a schwa, and then, it’s — another way to look at it is it becomes a softer sound. So let’s say some of the words. “London”, not “Lon-don”. “London, England, together”, not “togeth-er”. “Together”. “Button”, not “butt-on”. “Button”. “Cousin”. So that’s the schwa, and supposedly the most common sound in the English language, and it’s a pretty confusing sound as well because it’s always spelled in different ways, and it doesn’t actually sound exactly the same when it moves around into different words. So not an easy one to get familiar with. So the main thing to take away from it is that don’t put that very big stress on all your syllables in the word. It won’t sound right.

No. 6, tip No. 6, British English is a non-rhotic accent. This is the sound /r/. In your language, maybe you do that thing where you roll your tongue which I can’t do. I just — I so can’t do it. So like how I can’t do that sound, you might find it really hard to make that sound without rolling your tongue. Okay. It’s hard. Pronunciation is not easy. But you can always work at something and train yourself. So when we make the R sound, the position of the tongue is quite far back in the throat. R, R, R. And it doesn’t have that rhotic sound. And in some dialects, for example, in Scottish, you do hear it. So I’m going to say this sentence in a Scottish accent, “The murderer wore red.” Sorry, Scottish people. But they put the R sound in. I kind of did it then. Maybe I can do it after all. But in my accent, I would say, “the murderer wore red.” So we don’t roll our tongues. And that’s something — if you want to speak standard British English, you could work on that R if you do it.

So if you’re Arabic or if you’re Spanish, Italian as well, you could work on that sound. No. 7, now. So this is a hard sound. I’m going to have to be honest with you. It’s a hard sound for me because I’m a Londoner, and I’m from South London, and we’re not very — we don’t like this sound very much. We like to replace it with an F sound. I’m not too bad making this sound at the beginning of a word, “three”, “thought”, “think”. But sometimes, it’s quite hard for me, like in this word. I want to say “birfday” with an F, but it should be “birthday”. It’s really hard for me. But it’s not just hard for me; it’s hard for people all over the world.

Maybe we should just get rid of this sound. We don’t need it anymore. Some people replace it with D. I’ve got an Italian student who replaces it with D. So he would say “dirty dree”. That’s not an Italian restaurant, but — restaurant? Italian restaurant? Why am I thinking about food? It’s not an Italian accent. Because he can’t say “th”, he replaces it with /d/. But other people might replace it with /v/ as well. So a tip for making the “th” sound, you put your tongue between your teeth. And it’s a kind of whisly sound without the /f/. Your lip is more pursed at the top. So you don’t want to do that when you’re making the “th”. Just try it. I’ll say the words for you. “Three”, “thumbs” — thumbs up if you can make that sound — “birthday”, “thought”, “think”, “bath”. It’s hard for me. I’m trying. I’m trying with you.

We’re learning together today. And rule No. 8, “can’t”. Oh, that’s meant to have that there. A lot of people get confused because sometimes they think, “Did you say a negative there, or did you say the positive?” They get really confused. In British English, we don’t always say the T. We don’t always pronounce the T in this word “can’t”. So it might sound like this, “I can’t understand you.” But it might also sound like this, “I can understand you.” And when I said it the second way, you didn’t hear the T. And the reason that happens is speech just become as little bit more fluid, a little bit more easy to say without the T.

But you don’t need to be confused because, actually, the opposite of “can’t” is “can”. And /caen/ is a different vowel. It’s /ae/, whereas this vowel is /a/. So they would sound completely different. It would be, “I can’t understand you.” Very different to “I can’t understand you” or “I can understand you.” So when you’re listening out for that negative sometimes, know that we might say it with or without a T.

So thank you everybody for watching today. You can do a little bit of extra practice on the EngVid site for this lesson. And if you do like my lesson, please do subscribe because I make lots of different lessons, not just about pronunciation but all other things about learning English as well that I think will be very education and very useful for you in your general development as a learner of English or someone who’s just trying to improve your English. And I’m finished now, so I’m going to go. I’m going to go now, okay? I’ll see you later.. “}

As found on Youtube

Neuro Linguistic Programming in Brighton

Learn English Grammar: Zero Conditional

{“en”:”Hello. We’re doing the zero conditional today. It’s a useful grammatical structure in English. Perhaps it’s used for, particularly to those who are rules-based people, who like knowing that A is going to result in B. My little nephew is like this. Hi, Alex. So, we’re doing the zero conditional. And this is about something that is generally true, like a scientific fact. If I press the toilet button, it flushes. Okay? “If”, condition, result. “If I do”, “If I play, this happens.” So this is in present simple, and the result also in the present simple. “If you heat ice, it melts.” So it’s like a scientific fact, it’s like something… This always happens in this same way. The condition always has the same result. Now, the result, this bit here, it can also be in the imperative rather than the present simple. So, I’ve put a little example here: “If you do…” “If you visit Devon,” -a place in the southwest of England-“go to Chagford.” Where I was born.

Okay? It’s a great place. So, it’s like “go to”, it’s an imperative. I’m telling you to do that. So this is a structure of command. “If you arrive late to my class again, you”, and then I’m going to need to… “You will have to go to the head master.” Okay? It’s the condition equals the result. It’s always the same. So if you’re late, you have to go to the head master. Okay? Condition, result, always the same relationship between the two. Now, we can have a couple of different, alternative options here. Instead of “if” we could also use “when” or “unless”.

I’ve written that unless… You know when… When’s talking about time, obviously. But “unless” means kind of if not, followed by the condition and result. Condition always in the present. So: “Unless if not he proposes”, obviously that’s quite weird, formal English. The translation would be something like… Or the simplification: “If he does not propose to marry you,”-to propose to marry you. Would you like to marry me?- “refuse to go on holiday with him again.” Okay? So: “refuse to go”, there you’ve got your imperative.

Okay? Now, we can change the order and put the result before the condition, and throw in a bit of “if” and “when” and “unless” right there in the middle just to mix things up, mix the bowl up. So, the result here is at the beginning. “The boss, my leader, the person who is in charge is angry” -again, notice present tense-“when I dance on my table.” Obviously, “when” could also be replaced by “if” there. “…if I dance on my table”. So, “when” would imply that I maybe dance on my table quite a lot. But “if”, I’m so scared of my boss that I don’t want to dance on my table. And “unless” would change it, so you’d have to have probably a different condition there. “The boss is angry unless I stay seated.” Okay, so let’s just have another quick recap. Something that’s generally true, like a scientific fact, like: “If I cross the road without looking, I get knocked over.” Sorry, that’s what the traffic’s like in London.

Pay attention. Look to your left, look to your right before it’s safe to go. “If”, condition, result. Present simple, present simple unless we’re using the imperative. “You will go to Chagford if you visit Devon.” And then we can mix in a bit of “when” and “unless”, meaning changing the positive, negative affirmation, so: “Unless he proposes to marry you,” blah, blah, blah, this will be the result. This will always be the result unless you do this. And then you can also have the result here and the condition here. The boss is angry if you don’t do the quiz right now and subscribe to my YouTube channel, and check out Exquisite English. Good night. God bless. See ya next time.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

English Books: How to learn English with Harry Potter!

{“en”:”Hey, everyone. I’m Alex. Thanks for clicking, and welcome to this important lesson on: “The Secret to Mastering English!” And the secret is… -“Where am I? And who are you?” -“You’re in Hogwarts, Alex. And I’m Dumbledore.” -“No you’re not. Dumbledore looks different.” -“I shaved. Listen, Alex. I have an important job for you. Can you do it?” -“Anything for you, Dumbledore. What is it?” -“Your engVid students want you to do a lesson on Harry Potter. Here, take this and teach them.” “Thank you.” “You’re a wizard, Alex. Now, go.” We’re back. So, today we are going to talk about Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, chapter one.

Now, I know for many of you, Harry Potter was the first book you read in English. And the reason it’s a really, really good book for you guys to read is that it is the most popular book series ever, which means that you can find it in many languages, there have been movies made about it, and you can find a lot of discussion about the characters, the dialogue, the story. So everyone knows pretty much what happens in a lot of these stories. Now, if you don’t have a copy of the book, what you can do is get a print version or an e-book version on Amazon attached to this video.

What I recommend, though, if you want a more interactive experience with Harry Potter is that you get the free audio book. Now, you can get a free audio book of Harry Potter, not just this one, the entire series, by signing up for the free trial at www.audible.com, which is attached to this video. When you click on the link, you will have to go through a couple of different pages and signups, but at the end you do get the book for free. So go through it, sign up, get the book for free, and it’s an excellent audio book. Highly recommend it. Now, why should we read Harry Potter? Well, it has interesting characters; Harry, Ron, Hermione, the Dursleys, Dumbledore who I met today.

How cool was that? It has great dialogue, great plot, and the language is pretty easy to follow, but of course, it still has a ton of useful vocabulary. Not just for non-native English speakers, but even for, you know, kids who are already native speakers of English. And finally, it’s just magical. It’s a magical story, a magical book. I love it. It’s one of my all-time favourites, so let’s start looking at chapter one. So what I’m going to do is look at the actual text from chapter one. Not every line, of course, but I’m going to pick some very specific lines that tell us important details about the story or that tell us some important vocabulary that I think is going to be useful for English students.

Now, you notice I gave a page number to start this. I am going to be looking at this hard cover version of the book. This was published by Raincoast Books in Vancouver, so this was published in Canada. Maybe your version is this one, maybe it’s not. Maybe you’re listening to the audio version, in which case page numbers are not important. But if you want to follow with a physical copy, this is the version that I am using. Okay? Let me put this down. Here we go. Page seven. So we start Harry Potter by learning about the Dursleys, Mr. and Mrs. Dursley, and their son, Dudley. First we have this line: “Mr. Dursley was the director of a firm named Grunnings, which made drills.” So, a firm is a company, and Mr. Dursley was the director of this company, and they made drills. Now, drills are a power tool. Think of the tool that allows you to put screws into things, like: “[Drilling noise]”. That’s a drill. Okay? So he was a director of a firm named Grunnings, which made drills.

Now, we have a description of him: “He was a big beefy man”, “beefy”, think of beef. So he was a little bit fat, and: “…with hardly any neck”. Now, “hardly any” means almost zero. So, he was so big and round that you couldn’t see his neck. Okay? Hardly any neck. “…although he did have a very large moustache”. So, moustache. Right? Everyone knows what that is there. And: “Mrs. Dursley”-Mr. Dursley’s wife- “spent so much of her time craning over the garden fences, spying on her neighbours.” So, here is a picture of a fence. In your backyard you have a fence that separates your house from your neighbour’s house, and here is a picture of Mrs. Dursley craning her neck. So, “to crane your neck” is to stretch it almost to the maximum point, and she’s spying on her neighbours. So Mrs.

Dursley is a very curious woman. “The Dursleys had everything they wanted” -I’m going to step off camera for this- “but they also had a secret, and their greatest fear was that somebody would discover it. They didn’t think they could bear it if anyone found out about the Potters.” So, they’re a very happy family, they have everything they need, but they have a secret, a family secret: They are ashamed of part of their family, and that part of the family is the Potters.

Now, here: “They didn’t think they could bear it”, so if you can bear something or you can’t bear something it means that you can’t handle it, support it, survive it. So they would not be able to handle it if someone, if their neighbours found out about the Potters, part of their family. So the Dursleys have a very clean image that they want their neighbours to follow. All right? Let’s keep going. And we’re back. So, continuing with page seven: “Mrs. Dursley pretended she didn’t have a sister”, so she has a sister and she doesn’t like her sister, but she pretended, she acted like she didn’t have a sister because… Excuse me. I like magic. “…because her sister and her good-for-nothing husband were as unDursleyish as it was possible to be.” First, some excellent vocabulary, here. A good-for-nothing person is someone who is good for nothing. So, this is an insult, a negative, very negative thing to say about someone.

So: “Your good-for-nothing son”, “Your good-for nothing sister”, etc. Her good-for-nothing husband, he had no value, no use, were as unDursleyish as it was possible to be. You will never, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever use this word outside of this book. So, Dursley is the last name of the family, and I guess, you know, if you act in a specific way you are Dursleyish. “Dursleyish” is kind of an adjective that J.K. Rowling made here. And if you are unDursleyish, you are not acting like a Dursley acts. Next: “The Dursleys shuttered to think what the neighbours would say if the Potters had a small son too, but they had never seen him.” So, they shuttered to think. If you shutter to think, it means you are just very afraid of what other people would say about you. They didn’t want to think: What would happen if their neighbours discovered that their, you know, Mrs.

Dursley’s sister had a son, and they had never seen Mrs. Dursley’s son, Mr. Dursley’s sister’s son. It’s a mouthful. Sorry. Moving on to page eight: “Mr. Dursley hummed as he picked out his most boring tie” -I’ll get off screen, here- “for work and Mrs. Dursley gossiped away happily as she wrestled a screaming Dudley into his highchair.” So this is the morning routine of the Dursleys. Mr. Dursley hummed: “Hmm, hmm, hmm, hmm, hmm, hmm, hmm, hmm, hmm, hmm, hmm, hmm”, this is humming, so he hummed as he picked out his most boring tie for work, and Mrs.

Dursley gossiped… Phrasal verb: “to gossip away”. So, “to gossip” is to tell secret information or kind of talk about people when they are not there. Say: -“Hey, did you hear that [mumbles]?” -“Oh! Did you hear that [mumbles]?” This is gossiping. So she gossiped away happily as she wrestled… “To wrestle”, think of wrestling. She has a small child, his name is Dudley, into his highchair. So, a highchair is what you put babies in or young toddlers in to feed them. So in this book, their son, you know, Dudley, is very, very small. He’s just a baby.

All right. Let’s keep going. Okay, to continue: “None of them noticed a large tawny owl flutter past the window.” So, “tawny” is a colour. It means light brown, or a mix of brown and orange. Okay? So a light brown, brown-orange owl flutter past the window. So, when you think of a bird and the wings going… Just swinging back and forth, the wings are fluttering. Okay? So the owl flutter… Fluttered, past tense, past the window. All right. “At half-past eight, Mr. Dursley picked up” -phrasal verb, “picked up”-“his briefcase,” -for work, his case for work with his papers- “pecked Mrs. Dursley on the cheek and tried to kiss Dudley goodbye but missed, because Dudley was now having a tantrum and throwing the cereal at the walls.” So, a lot of information here. So, Mr. Dursley is getting ready to go to work. He pecked Mrs. Dursley on the cheek. So this is your cheek, a peck can be a quick kiss, like: “[Kisses]”, that’s a peck.

Also think of birds eating seeds, they peck, peck, peck, peck, peck, peck, peck. Okay? So this action is quick movement of the mouth, is a quick peck. All right? On the cheek. He tried to kiss Dudley, but Dudley was throwing cereal at the walls. So, a tantrum is like an emotional episode, a period where a child or an adult sometimes is acting really, really emotionally and angrily, like: “Ah.” If you go to a department store and you see a child lying on the floor crying, and the parents are saying: “Come on, let’s go, let’s go”, the child is having a tantrum. It’s not a nice scene. And: “There was a tabby cat standing on the corner of Privet Drive. What could he have been thinking of?” So before this line it is important to note that now Mr. Dursley has left his house, he’s in his car, he has left his driveway, and before this line he thinks he sees a cat reading a map.

Okay? So he’s like: “There’s a cat reading a map. Wait, wait?” So he sees the cat reading a map, he does what he keeps doing, he looks back and then he says: “Okay, there was a tabby cat standing on the corner of Privet Drive.” This is the street the Dursleys live on. “Ah, what could he have been thinking of?” What could Mr. Dursley have been thinking of? He couldn’t have seen a cat reading a map, could he? So a tabby cat…

Tabby refers to kind of like the fur of the cat. Any cat that has a lot of stripes of different colours, and usually an “M” pattern on their forehead is a tabby. Many native speakers only think of orange cats as being tabby cats, but it’s actually all cats, so we learned something new today. Yeah, I love this book, too. Okay, we’ll talk later. Okay, see ya. All right. So: “Mr. Dursley couldn’t bear people who dressed in funny clothes – the get-ups you saw on young people!” So before this, Mr. Dursley is driving to work and he sees lots of people dressed in really bright cloaks, which are these kind of long robes. Okay? So he couldn’t bear… He couldn’t handle people who dressed in funny clothes. The get-ups you saw on young people today. So, a get-up is kind of like a costume. Okay? Or a funny uniform. So if I say: “That’s a nice get-up”, that’s a nice kind of uniform or costume, or something that is different than a regular set of clothes.

So he’s saying: “These people are dressed weird on the street today. I think I saw a cat reading a map. There are people running around. There’s an owl.” And then: “Mr. Dursley was enraged to see that a couple of them” -a couple of the people on the street-“weren’t young at all. Why, that man had to be older than he was, and he was wearing an emerald-green cloak!” So he thinks: “Hah, these young people today with their weird clothes.” But he said: “No! This guy is as old as I am or older, so what’s going on here?” And finally: “Mr.

Dursley”… After getting to work. Now he’s at work, he’s at Grunnings. He’s in his office, he said: “Mr. Dursley always sat with his back to the window”… I’ll move out so you can read this completely. So he: “…always sat with his back to the window in his office on the ninth floor. If he hadn’t, he might have found it harder to concentrate on drills that morning. He didn’t see the owls swooping past in broad daylight, though people down in the street did.” So here we have a conditional, so: “If he hadn’t sat with his back to the window, he might have found it harder to concentrate on drills that morning”, so this book is written in the past tense. Here, we’re using the third conditional, so: “If he had not sat with his back to the window, he might have found it harder to concentrate on drills that morning.

He didn’t see the owls”-hoo-hoo-“the birds that are flying everywhere, swooping past in broad daylight”. So, swoop. Okay? Kind of these motions. Swooping back and forth. In broad daylight, this means in the open day. So everyone can see. It’s sunny and there are owls flying everywhere, which is strange because owls are night animals. Right? Okay, let’s continue. So, it is now lunchtime for Mr. Dursley at his firm, Grunnings, and what he sees are a bunch of men in green cloaks still walking around, so there are people dressed strangely around Mr.

Dursley’s workplace. It says that Mr. Dursley: “He eyed them angrily as he passed.” So, “to eye someone” is to look at them like this. So if he’s eyeing them angrily, he’s looking at them angrily. Okay? Now, you can use this to say that you have been, for example, wanting to buy something for a very long time. So if you want a new iPhone, for example, you can say: “Ah, I have been eyeing that phone for a long time.” You’ve been paying attention to it and looking at it for a long time.

So, he eyed the men in green cloaks angrily. Now, here he hears these men talking and he hears them say something about the Potters, their son, Harry. Wait a minute, why are these men whom I’ve never met in my life mentioning my wife’s family’s name and a possible son? So: “The Potters… Their son, Harry.” They say this, and then: “Mr. Dursley stopped dead. Fear flooded him.” This doesn’t mean he died, it just means he’s walking, he hears: -“The Potters… Their son, Harry.” -“Why? Why are they talking about me?” So he stopped like he was dead. Okay? “Fear flooded him.” So fear filled him.

Okay? Now: “Mr. Dursley stood rooted to the spot.” This is after work now, he’s going home, and after being hugged by a man in a violet cloak after work. So, at lunch he hears these men talking about the Potters, their son Harry. After work, a man in a cloak comes up to him, gives him a hug. And Mr. Dursley stood rooted to the spot. So, “rooted”, think of a tree. All right? Here’s the ground, you have a tree, and this tree has roots under the ground. So Mr. Dursley stood rooted like his feet had roots in them into the ground.

He couldn’t move because he’s so uncomfortable by this man in a cloak hugging him. And then he goes home. We’re on page 11. And Mr. Dursley asks his wife if she has talked to her sister lately, because he’s thinking about the cat with the map, the men with the cloaks, the mentioning of Harry and the Potters, and he’s at home, he said: “Have you talked to your sister lately?” And: “Mrs.

Dursley”-the wife-“sipped her tea through pursed lips.” So she does not like her sister or hearing about her sister. She sipped, like I’m going to sip this hot coffee through pursed lips. So, pursed lips are like this. Like… Okay? So, okay? Like she doesn’t want to say anything. So she’s angry. Pursed lips. “While Mrs. Dursley was in the bathroom,”-later in the evening- “Mr. Dursley crept to the bedroom and peered down into the front garden.” So, “to creep”, the verb “creep” means to move very slowly and quietly, secretly almost. Okay, so he’s creeping through his house, and he’s peering. So, “to peer” is to look with intensity, but with a little difficulty, like he’s looking, he’s trying to see something, but he’s just not sure what he’s looking for because it has been a really messed up, weird day for Mr. Dursley. Now it’s nighttime, the Dursleys have gone to sleep. Everyone on Privet Drive is in their beds, and on the corner of the street there is a man, Albus Dumbledore.

This Dumbledore right here. The man I spoke to at the start of this video, apparently, so he says. He’s got magic, so I guess it was really him. All right, so: “Nothing like this man”, like Albus Dumbledore… “Nothing like this man had ever been seen on Privet Drive.” So here you have the past perfect. So remember this book is written in the past simple, which means if something happened before, you know, the present of the book which is written in the past, it must be spoken in the past perfect.

So: “Nothing like this man had ever been seen on Privet Drive.” No one had ever seen a man like Albus Dumbledore. Page 13. We have Dumbledore, he’s walking to, you know, around the Dursley’s house. He sees a cat, and he says to the cat: “Fancy seeing you here, Professor McGonagall.” And the cat is actually Professor McGonagall who is another person from, later we learn Hogwarts, the school of magic, that’s what it is. Okay. So, if you say: “Huh, fancy that, fancy seeing you here.” This means it’s a surprise to see you here. Wow, it’s cool to see you here. Okay? I didn’t expect to see you here. So if you see something shocking or surprising in daily life, and you say: “Huh, fancy that”, then that means: “Well, isn’t that a surprise?” So this is more of British English than North American English, which is why it’s in this book.

Now, Dumbledore says this, and then Professor McGonagall is talking about today and everyone talking about the Potters, everyone talking about their son Harry, and everyone talking about you know who. Now, “you know who” whose name is Voldemort, is an evil dark lord. So McGonagall says about today with people talking about him: “People are being downright careless out on the streets in broad daylight.” So she is talking about the community of wizards, magicians, witches, and it seems like they’re celebrating something, and she’s saying: “They are not being careful enough.” So, “downlight careless” means absolutely careless without any care, without being careful. They’re so excited about something today in the magician community. And then Dumbledore mentions Voldemort. Professor McGonagall refers to Voldemort as “you know who”, and Dumbledore says: “Use his name.

His name is Voldemort”, and Professor McGonagall flinched at the mention of Voldemort. So when you flinch you kind of, like, put your body back, close your eyes like this, like… Okay? So, if Voldemort is a name that’s scary, that is not supposed to be said and Dumbledore says: “Voldemort” and she says… Not says, but goes… She flinches. Flinch. If someone comes up to you, for example, I’m coming up to the camera and I go… Did you flinch? Because you thought I was going to like hit you or something. Maybe we have 3D laptops now and my fist is coming through the screen. I don’t know. I erased this with my back, that’s okay. Page 16. Now, we’re not finished yet with all the activity on Privet Drive. “A small rumbling sound had broken the silence around them.” Rumbling, something that vibrates a little bit had broken the silence around them, so it’s quiet and in the background they hear: “[Rumbling noise]”. “Dumbledore and Professor McGonagall bent forward over the bundle of blankets.” So, before this, the rumbling sound is actually Hagrid.

Now, Hagrid comes on a motorcycle and he has a baby in his hand. It’s Harry Potter. And when he shows the baby to Dumbledore and McGonagall they bent forward over the bundle of blankets. “Bent” is the past of “bend”, so they bent forward. Right? To bend forward over the bundle of blankets. So if a baby is wrapped in a lot of blankets, we call this a bundle. Okay? A bundle of blankets. Now we’re nearing near… Now we’re nearing near? We’re nearing the end of chapter one. Now, Dumbledore asks for Hagrid to give Harry to him. He says: “Well, give him here, Hagrid – we’d better get this over with.” So, this is a complete expression: “to get something over with”. If I say: “Let’s get this over with”, it means: “Let’s finish this, let’s end it”, even though sometimes it’s unpleasant. So you want to do something that you don’t want to do, but you have to do it, so you say: “Let’s get it over with.” Right? Let’s finish it.

Let’s just… Let’s do it. Okay? So, Dumbledore takes Harry, and then Hagrid says goodbye to Harry, and then: “Wiping his streaming eyes on his jacket”, so “wiping”, wipe, wipe, wipe. “Wiping his streaming eyes on his jacket sleeve, Hagrid swung himself on to the motorbike and kicked the engine into life.” So, “streaming”. He was crying because there was this little baby, he’s giving him away, and he’s wiping his streaming eyes on his jacket sleeve. This is a sleeve on a jacket. He’s wiping his eyes on the sleeve, and he swung himself… “To swing”, okay? A baseball bat, you can swing a baseball bat. Hagrid swung himself on to his motorbike, and he kicked the engine into life and he flew away because it’s a flying motorcycle. Pretty cool. Finally, page 18 of chapter one. Dumbledore and McGonagall, they have been saying and talking about Harry a lot. So apparently last night Lord Voldemort killed Harry’s parents. Killed Harry’s parents. Okay? However, he was not able to kill Harry.

And somehow for some reason Lord Voldemort, this evil dark lord disappeared after not being able to kill Harry. So, they leave him at the Dursleys house. Harry is now going to stay with the only family he has left, the awful Mr. Dursley, the awful Mrs. Dursley, the awful Dudley Dursley because he has no parents anymore, and this is his only family. So Dumbledore writes a letter, puts it in the basket with Harry, they leave him on the door, and Dumbledore says: “Good luck, Harry.” “‘Good luck, Harry,’ he murmured.” To murmur is to speak softly because it’s nighttime. Kind of like… Not a whisper. A whisper is like this. A murmur is like this. Okay? So: “Good luck, Harry. Good luck.” And finally, Harry: “He couldn’t know that at this very moment people meeting in secret all over the country were holding up their glasses and saying in hushed” -shh, quiet, hushed-“voices: ‘To Harry Potter – the boy who lived.'” So, what is happening here is that everyone is celebrating, magicians and wizards all over England are celebrating because Lord Voldemort is gone.

He’s dead, and it’s because of Harry Potter and Harry Potter is now going to stay with his family, with his aunt and his uncle who are not very nice people. From here the story only gets more exciting and more interesting. All right, so this was a very long lesson. If you’re still here with me, thank you, and I hope that you enjoyed it. If you did enjoy it, don’t forget to like the video, comment on it, subscribe to the channel, and check me out on Facebook and Twitter. Now, like I mentioned at the start of this video: If you want to have a really interactive experience with Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone or any of the Harry Potter books, I really recommend that you check out the link to audible.com attached to this video for the free audio book.

Now, again, you will have to click probably two or three links after the original link to get to the end, but after signing up, you do get the free audio book and that’s pretty cool. So, again, audio books are great ways for you to practice your listening, to practice your pronunciation, to hear the natural speed of English being spoken fluently. So I really recommend that you do that.

Till next time, thanks for clicking. Bye.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Steps to Learning English: Where should you start?

{“en”:”[Singing] Hi. James. Greer. James Greer. From engVid. [Laughs]. Not Bond, and I know you think I was going to say Bond. I know. But listen, Bond always has an important mission he’s got to do, right? 007. And so do I. Today we have a mission. We’re going to learn how to study English. I know in many places, many websites, they tell you, and to teach you grammar and idioms and phrasal verbs.

But then, there’s the big question of you, and: How do you study, and how do you choose what is important for you at this moment? Maybe you’re advanced. Maybe you’re a beginner. Maybe you know this, and maybe you don’t. After today’s lesson and we do our mission, you’ll know exactly what you have to do. Okay? So, we’re going to go to the board in a second, and take a look. What steps should we take in order to learn? By the time you’re done this video, you’ll know exactly… Or you should know where you are, where you need to go, and when you’re going to be done. Ready? Let’s go. E. E is standing here saying: “Where do I start? Grammar, vocabulary, or speaking?” Common, and seems to make sense, I mean, you go to learn a language-right?-you go on a website, they start throwing things at you. You go to a school, they say you need this, this, and this.

But you don’t really know. So, I’m going to give you the tools to decide that. First thing we’re going to do is: What’s the first thing you need? Grammar? No. What? Conversation? No. Vocabulary. What? Well, look. If you can’t say: “bathroom” when you go to a country, you’re going to pee yourself. Okay? “Hungry”, you won’t get food. You don’t need to know everything to get basic information done. And that’s what we should look at first. Basic information for a beginner really is vocabulary. And instead of all the fancy stuff you need, you don’t need much. You need you, and a little bit of time, and to have some fun. Why? I’m going to suggest: For basic communication, get vocabulary. I’m telling you right now if I see you or any English-speaking person sees you, and you see… You say: “Drink. Thirsty.” There’s no grammar, but they’ll go: “Oh, the bar is over there.” If you say: “Washroom. Please”, they’ll go: “Oh, toilet is over there.” They use sentence, you use words.

Sometimes you just touch your belly and go: “Ahh!” They’ll go: “Oh, you want food.” You don’t need all that stuff. People will tell you you need to learn grammar, and this and that. You don’t. And here’s how you get your first vocabulary. Do what you love to do. Play video games. I’ve had… I don’t know how many students play video games, say they learned how to fire, duck, words that we wouldn’t teach them for a while, because they were playing games. Other people come in: “Dah-dah-dah-dah-dah, [sings]”, singing. I go: -“What the hell?” -“I love to sing”, and they sing a song, they sound like they’re just, you know, from this country.

Then they speak very terrible accent. You know what I’m saying, right? [Laughs] But when they sing, it’s like the gods have come down. I mean, literally, you go: “Are you…? You were born here, right?” Cool slang. You know? YOLO, you only live once. Right? ASAP, as soon as possible. When you do these things, you’re learning because you want to learn. You’re not even realising you’re learning, and it’s going to make you want to learn more because… You know, we’ll get to the second one and you’ll understand. But you want to communicate in a much better way. Okay? So, get the meaning of basic words. “Hungry”, “food”, “toilet”, “money”. You know that one, right? You need those things. If you have those things, you can start your adventure in learning English. Okay? And you’re going to do it by doing things you love. Video games, music, cool slang.

Right? Come on. Now we’re making language fun and easy for you, and that’s what we should do, because you’ll learn it faster. All right? And then here’s the bad news: Hard work is on its way, so let’s move over to the intermediate. So if you’re still on vocabulary and you can’t put a sentence together, you’re a beginner. Okay? But at least you’re better than other people. You know words in a foreign language. Cool. Intermediate is when we start, and I think you should introduce grammar. This is when your vocabulary is rich enough that you can say things like: “Need water.” Where? It’s not a sentence, so you kind of sound stupid. I’m saying it right out. You sound stupid. Had many students, brilliant people, sounding like… I called them kids. And I loved them. I thought they were great people, but I would call them kids because they sound like two and five year olds.

“Mommy, water, now.” Understand. Sentence? Not really. Grammar. Some teachers don’t think it’s necessary. It is. It’s like a skeleton in a body. Right? When you’re crawling on the floor, you still need a skeleton, something to hold everything together, but really it’s the muscles and everything else that make you move. But the skeleton is necessary or needed. Those are those bones. Right? These are the bones of the language. You got, you know, your vocabulary, but these hold everything together, that skeleton. Now, when you learn grammar, we do this to be understood.

We said basic communication. To be understood we need grammar. This is sound… And you can sound like you understand. “Oh! I can’t have your girlfriend and all of your money? Oh. I didn’t know that. I understand.” You sound like you understand someone. You can communicate an idea. “I would like to be a millionaire, but I don’t want to work.” See? I’ve communicated: “I am lazy, but I still want to be rich.” Like everyone in North America. Okay, but we’re going to take our vocabulary…

See, this is when you have the vocabulary, you take it, and you put it with some muscle. You put vocabulary and function words. That’s what grammar is. It’s the words that function. It’s the verbs. Right? It’s the pronouns. It’s all these things that go together. It’s like making a hamburger. Okay? You got your meat. Now you need a bun, some lettuce, and everything else. This is your grammar. This makes it good. Okay? So, now you can sound pretty intelligent, not like a child, but some people have great grammar skills and good vocabulary, but-and this is where we go to the advanced-they don’t sound like us.

They still haven’t got it quite together. We know you’re not from here. This is change it all. And this is something that I find interesting. Some students don’t want to do, they think it’s a waste of time. And then I remind them: In your country, are there people who don’t know how to read and write? What do you call them? Some people say (this is a fancy word): “They are illiterate.” I say: “No. They’re stupid.” Because you say: “Hey, read this.” They go: “I cannot read.” You go: “You’re stupid. Didn’t you go to school, stupid?” Don’t be stupid. Learn to read and write. It’s not just for that reason, for your ego that people…

It makes you feel good. It’s also because it teaches you how to think in the language. Huh? Well, when you write something down, you have to remember the author wrote it three years ago. The author is the writer of the book, could be a male, female, or whoever made it. They wrote it three or four years ago, and you’re not there. So when they write about it, they have to think in a way that you would understand it three years later, and not have to ask questions.

Because if you have to say: “I’m confused. What does he mean? Let me call him up. Yo, E, on page 47 you wrote this thing. It’s an awkward phrase. You got a dangling modifier, so I’m not really sure…” It doesn’t work like that. They have to write it properly so you understand it. This is when we become advanced, because you learn logical thought, how we put it together. When we talk about logical thought, we talk about syntax; how the words go together , how things flow, how we think. Every language is different, and the syntax is a bit different. Okay? This will make you think like a native speaker. You have to put the words and even the sentences in a way that makes sense to us. Okay? Remember I said you sound…? Here I meant not stupid. That was it, you don’t sound stupid. Reading and writing makes you sound intelligent, and there’s a difference.

Suddenly, I want to hear what you have to say, because you seem to know what you’re talking about, and you present your ideas in a way I can understand. It also gives you the time to think about the language, so it goes on in your brain, so it knows how to analyze and present the language for us. This is something people skip, because they want to speak, and don’t realize this is a very important part. Reading gives you an understanding of how we’re thinking. You read, you get that. When you write, you have to write in a way that we would understand it. Powerful stuff. And how does it do that? Well, we have three components or three parts. Number one, the grammar. See? Grammar we talked about. Grammar has to be in something you write. Okay? Then it has to be true.

What you say has to make sense to us. It’s logical. I can’t be just: “I am an alien, and I live in the sea, and I have fins and baby-back ribs.” It doesn’t make any sense, even if the sentence is perfectly grammatically correct. It’s like: “This is not true. I will not listen to you.” And then finally we have to connect them, and this is what we talk about syntax, and when we put all of these things together, suddenly you’re speaking and people understand you. Accent or no accent, you are an English speaker. Not quite. Almost. When we put all these three together, and we go to speaking, and you master speaking, which will happen if you take these steps – you will notice you are being understood when you speak. Not five times: “Sorry? Huh? Sorry? Sor-, sorry? Oh, okay. Oh, I’m sorry. No. Sorry?” No. You will speak, you will be understood. When I speak, and some of you think I speak very quickly. And you’re right. My students actually often laugh go: “You don’t speak quickly on those videos.

You speak quickly in real life.” But I like it when people understand me. You will find that you understand me more. You will have more understanding what I say, and English people say. You won’t be guessing what they’re saying. You will actually understand them. Finally, you know that accent that you really don’t like, and you wish you could get rid of? You will. Speaking and using a practice of speaking helps you with proper pronunciation. That’s what helps you with being understood, and actually helps you with understanding other people, because you realize it’s not the absolute pronunciation, but where you put the stresses, what the meaning is. Right? All this comes with language or speaking. You can communicate and have mastered the language. That’s what we talk about by speaking, and I wrote that for a reason. When you are speaking, it’s right or it’s wrong. There’s no time to think about it. That’s what your practice in reading and writing is for.

Okay? So once you can actually speak, you’re done. Congratulations. You’ve learned a new language. Now, look. I want to do… I want to go through a couple of hints to help you out in a second or two, and then I want you to go out there and practice. Figure out where you are. You’ll know, because I’ve already told you. You’re either a beginner and you got to work on your vocabulary. That means most of what I said you didn’t understand. Or you’re intermediate, you got something out of what I’m saying, but you know you can’t express yourself that way. You’re advanced, you’re already smart enough to be writing every day and reading every day.

Or you’re basically fluent and native. Get outta here. Go outside and play. That’s what you should be doing. You ready? Let’s go through those helpful hints. [Snaps] So, we’ve talked about where you might be as a learner; advanced, beginner, or native. Now, I want to give you some more basic hints on acquiring or getting the language. Are you ready? Okay, basic hint number one: 30 minutes a day goes a long way. Whether you’re a beginner, intermediate, or advanced, 30 minutes. If you’re not willing to spend 30 minutes learning, you really don’t want to learn. All right? You need to practice regularly. Give you a good hint or a good example. When you were a baby, you were trying to walk. You would fall down. You would never stand and walk, you kept falling. But every day you tried, and sometimes hours, hours, hours.

Then one day, you started to walk, then you started to run. If you told that baby that 30 minutes a day was a lot of work, you’d be sitting in a chair for the rest of your life. Right? So, 30 minutes a day. Hey, an engVid video is 15. Boo, half your work’s done. Am I a genius? Yeah. Helped you out. Okay, so 30 minutes a day is a good thing to do. Okay? It goes a long way to help you retain or remember the information. Number two: Spend five minutes and review what you did the day before.

I know, it’s 35 minutes, but it’s still not an hour. Okay? So, before, you know, you do your new lesson, think for five minutes: “What did I do yesterday when I did English? Did I…?” Was it…? Were you reading? Did you write? What did you write about? Were there any things you wanted to change in your writing? Okay? So, remember, in your 30 minutes, that can be 30 minutes of writing, 30 minutes of reading, 30 minutes of going through the dictionary looking for words you need, basic words. Right? Or, I don’t know, listening to, like I said, an engVid video.

Watching it twice. The first time, you watch it; second time, make notes about things you want to learn .Right? That’s 30 minutes. Painless. Five minutes review is good, because it’s like eating food. If you take a burger, just put it in your mouth, it’s not as good as when you take it, and chew it and taste it. When you taste it, that’s where the joy comes from. That’s what you should do with language. Just taste it. Play with it a bit. Number three: Imagine yourself in a situation where you have to use the English you’ve learned. That could be part of your 30 minutes. Read for a little while, stop, put the story in your head, close your eyes, and imagine it. If you imagine it, it becomes real. When it becomes real, it becomes useful. Okay? If you just write some grammar down and you write some rules, and you never think about using it, then guess what? You won’t.

So, why don’t we take a couple minutes with our review? Imagine. Okay? “I just learned this new vocabulary. James said something about a pharmacy. Now, imagine I had to go… What did he say I have to say? ‘Can you help me with…?'” Now, imagine asking the… There you go. Next thing you know, you’re in the situation, the words come out of your mouth. Practice. Number four: Set goals. What do you want to do with your English? I know.

“I want to speak English today.” It’s not going to happen. Sorry. Okay? Just like if you want a burger, you have to actually catch a cow, kill a cow, bring it to the store, grind it up or make meat for it, then put it on the barbecue. It doesn’t happen. Right? There’s many steps to it. So, in this case, set goals. Maybe a five-minute conversation with a native speaker. Two-minute, one-minute conversation. Maybe it’s learn turn… Ten words really well. Okay? So you read a book, you pick out ten words you don’t know, go to the dictionary, write it out, then write out sentences with those words. Talk to…

Try and use them in a conversation with somebody so that they become something you’ve digested, that means taken in and you understand. Okay? You understand it completely. Apply for a job. Here’s one. You… It’s the 21st century, bub. Get on the internet. “I would like to work for your company.” Send it out. Right? See what responses you get back. Now, most of them will say: “Hey, your grammar is really bad.” Right? Or you can do a phone interview. Say: “Hey, can we do a Skype interview for this job?” Practice. Just because you’re not living here right now doesn’t mean you can’t put it into practice. And through your mistakes, you can learn, and then go back and use that for your 30 minutes of work. Right? “They didn’t like my accent. It was too strong. Okay, work on pronunciation. They said my grammar skills seemed to be a bit weak.

Okay, work on grammar skills. My vocabulary was limited. I noticed I kept repeating the same thing. Okay, work on vocabulary. Work on synonyms.” You will start making your own lesson plan based on you, not on what some book or some teacher tells you to do. Finally: Travel. I should do, like, say this. Right? Travel. I know. This is not easy. You don’t have money. Right? You don’t have time. But why are you learning it? Everything you really want, you have to do something. We call it a sacrifice. You have to give something to get something you really want. You want to eat, you buy food.

The food’s not free. Right? You want to really use your language, you got to travel. You don’t have to be… Do a big trip. You can find things on the internet where it’s exchange. Somebody’s family comes to your house, you go to their house for two weeks, or something like that. Governments do exchanges where there’s learning programs. Right? Hey, you can go to startup programs. “Hi. I want to learn English. Send me to a country.” Some people, if you give a good enough story: “I live in a farm out in Lithuania.

My family is, you know… Always wanted me to do better with my life, and we know English is important. So, my father’s willing to give up three cows to have me go to Canada.” Put it out there. Somebody will go: “Oh, come on, man. I’ll give you the money.” You know, miracles happen. Things can happen, but you got to do something. Travelling is the one thing that makes you go out there, because you got to do something. You can’t pretend you want to learn, because you have to put your money there. That will be hard, and I admit that. But once you do, if you’re doing all of these things, there’s nothing sweeter than getting off a plane, and saying: “Hi. Can you help me this? I’m looking for a friend of mine”, and the other person going: “Sure, no problem.

Let me take you.” And you’re understood. Right? Cool? I think it’s cool. Anyway, where do I start? You know where to start now, whether you’re a beginner, intermediate, advanced, or you’re native. I’ve given you some helpful hints that you can use starting right this minute. Right? You’re watching one video, so 15 minutes of your time is done. Hit the next one, or go do the quiz.

All right? Cool. Listen, hope I’ve done my part for you. Now it’s time for you to do your part. Study, practice, review. And when you can and if you can, and if you can get the help, travel, see the world. All right? Listen, I got to go. You have a great day. All right? Don’t forget to do the quiz. Where? www, eng, as in English, vid, as in video. I probably did that backwards. Right? engVid. Doesn’t matter. You know. Go to www.engvid.com. Don’t forget to subscribe. It’s somewhere around here. Somewhere. Subscribe. And once again and always, thank you very much for being a part of our family. All right? Have a good one. Ciao.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Studying English at a Language School

{“en”:”Hello, folks. So this morning, we’ve come along to a very good language school in London because we want to have a look at what it’s like to be a student in one of these schools. Come, and let’s find out. — Hi, Lee. — Hi, Ben. — So our viewers are learning English on the Internet. What would be an advantage of coming to a language school for a time to learn some English? — I think the key difference is that when you’re at a language school, then you are part of a whole experience. If you’re learning online, it’s great, but it’s for an hour or two, and that’s it.

Whereas if you come to the school, then you have complete immersion in a whole day of English if you like. If you’re staying with a host family, you have English experience before you come to school. All day, you’re speaking English, and if you take part in our social activities in the evening, then you’re carrying on. So it’s constantly learning and taking in and processing of new information. — Sure. So if someone was studying here and staying with a host family, they might share meals with the family. — Yeah. — And I guess there are students coming from many different countries. — Exactly. And of course, then you get this interaction with loads and loads of different students from all over the world, which, again, really challenges you in different ways when you’re learning English, I think. — And do students come here for a couple of weeks? — Some do. Some students come for a couple of weeks. Some students come for a year. It depends on what that student is looking for, what they need, what their plans are. So it can be either-or.

— And I guess it’s very exciting being here in London. You know, we’ve got a lot of English culture around us. — Of course. I mean, the history, the art, the literature, the theatre scene is just really advantageous to learning English. It’s just an amazing city. So to come and study here is a really good thing, I think. — Yeah. I mean, I guess the student can learn more the more they put themselves in an English environment, the more they speak.

— Exactly. If you immerse yourself in something completely, then you’re going to get more out of it, I think. — Cool. Well, is it possible to go and have a look at a class this morning? — Yeah. Absolutely. I think Dan is waiting for you upstairs. — Great. Thank you very much. –You’re welcome. –Let’s go upstairs. So let’s go and have a quick look now at a general English class and what that looks like in a language school. Okay. Come have a look. — Hi, there, Dan. — Hi. — Hi. We’ve just come to have a look at your general English class today. — Hello. — What exactly are you going to be doing in class today? — Today, we’re looking at the difference between literal and non-literal meanings of nine elements of vocabulary.

I was just asking Nir what he thought about the difference between “enough food” and “too much food”. So, sorry. — I think it depends. — Okay. In this meaning, do you think that it’s — if there is “lots of”, is it good or bad? — Yeah. It’s good. — Good? Would you agree, guys? It’s good? — I think it’s bad. — Okay. Hands up if you think it’s good. Nir, you stand alone, my friend. I’m sorry. Hands up if you think it’s bad. — In fact, that’s what I looked like last night at about 10:30. But what other words? Fly. That’s what I’m looking for, “fly”. Read the sentences with your partner.

I want you to decide two things. No. 1, which sentence is the literal meaning? Which sentence is the non-literal meaning. No. 2, what do you think the non-literal meaning means in other languages? Okay. Good. So it’s a word. You can use it, but it doesn’t mean what you think it means here. In this case, you mean “hard”, not “hardly”. — “To question.” “Question” can be a verb? — Yes. Of course. “I question.” Yeah. Good guess. Well done. So that was a great lesson from Dan. They’re really engaging in the teaching, and the students were obviously enjoying it. We’re going to go down to the lunch hall now and grab a bit of lunch. And then, we’ve got a couple of students who we’ll be talking to. They’re from different parts of the world. So I’m hungry. Let’s go and eat. [Crowd chatter] Well, that was a delicious lunch. And we enjoyed having a look at Dan’s class. Now, we’ve got three students at the London School of English here. And firstly, folks, could you tell me what course you’re doing and how long you have learned English for? So starting with Takami.

— I’m taking a Cambridge English examination preparation course. It’s called FCE. So just this course I have studied three weeks. Yeah. I have another five weeks. — Okay. And before, when you were in Japan, how long did you learn? Like, one year, two years learning English? Or — — Honestly, no. Nothing. — Nothing at all? Okay. Wow. Very interesting. Okay. Thanks. And Veronica? — I’ve done the general course for one month, and then I’ve started three weeks ago the CAE course, which is the Cambridge Advanced Exam. And that last — — Why did you choose this course? — The CAE? — Yeah. — Because I needed to get into university, and I’ve also heard that this academy prepares very well students to pass the exams. And I’ve been — — So you’re hoping to study in a university in England? — No, not in England, in Switzerland.

— Okay. — And they are asking for a B in CAE. And yeah. They’ve told me that this academy really will help you to pass the exam successfully. — Good luck to you. — Thank you. — And Francis, tell me, how long have you been learning English, and why did you decide to come and study in England? — I started English in secondary school and some more in university. And I decided to come here because I want to improve my English a lot. But only for pleasure. And for me, the best place to learn English is in London.

— Sure. — So I come here, and I’m learning here in this school. — Cool. Veronica, had you been studying in Spain how to speak English? — I’ve studied English in Spain, but with au pairs. At school as well, but the level in my school was pretty low. So yeah. The au pairs have helped me to get this fluency. — And how do you find the teachers different in London and in a language school compared to in a school where you’re from? — Well, I think that teachers here have more experience, and they do really know which mistakes do students make. Whereas the teachers in Spain, obviously, they are experienced as well, but not as much as a language teacher would be. — So they’re more specific? — Yeah. More specific. They know the mistakes that people from different countries make, and yeah. I think that’s the main reason, I think. — So Takami, do you feel you’re improving your English in a good way? — Yeah.

Just getting better. But of course, I need to more improve. But I feel that day by day getting my English better. — Cool. And so for all of you, it’s been stimulating; it’s been an interesting time being here? You’re obviously making really good friends here. Is it something you’d recommend to people? — Absolutely. You should go. — Yeah, definitely. Yeah. I’ve already spread it all over. — You should come here. It’s a life experience. You have to do it once at least in your life. I enjoy it a lot. I improve my English a lot. I make a lot of friends from different parts of the world.

So it is amazing. I enjoy it a lot. — So guys, I’ve lived in London for six years. And I feel I know it well, but for you coming to London, is it a good place to come to? Is it easy for you to speak to people and practice English being here in London? — Yes. I met some very friendly people in the pubs or wherever you are. And yeah. It’s very easy. For me, as I said, it’s a life experience to be here. So London, for me, it’s the capital of the world. — Wow. — It’s not the United States; it’s not Washington. It’s London. Very cosmopolitan. — London’s on the map. — Yeah. Absolutely. — And are there enough things for you to do? — Definitely. — On the weekends, for example, are there opportunities to do things? — Yeah. You won’t run out of chances or different activities to do.

One weekend, you can go and see a theatre play, a musical, and then visit different areas from the city. It is a very versatile city. You can go to the north of London, and it’s completely different from the south of London. So you won’t ever — — I feel like I’m in a different country in some parts. — Yeah. It’s like a country. So you won’t ever get bored of living here. — Great. So the best way for you guys to learn English, is it from reading? Is it from listening? Is it a mixture? What’s the best way? — I think it’s a mixture because you learn the grammar basics in class. Then, afterwards, you can socialize at lunch. And then afterwards, with the social program, you’re able to talk to everyone and get to know everybody and talk about your country, their country.

You learn different cultures. You — yeah. You get to socialize. — Is it difficult for you to speak English to someone from Spain? — Well, if we — — It was easy the first day that we met each other, so it’s easy. Yeah. If you met someone and you start speaking English, it’s easy to ongoing with that. — And if both of us want to speak English, then it’s okay. Because I know other Spanish students here that they feel that they want to speak Spanish with me, for example. But don’t do that because we are all here to improve our English, and we are interested in learning English, not in speaking our native language. — It’s true. — And here, you have the possibility to speak 24 hours. — That’s why it’s the best way.

— So after school, you can go to the pub. — No sleep. — Exactly. — We are trying to speak English even with same country people. — That’s cool. — It’s important. — Well, thank you so much for coming in and speaking today. It’s been really useful. And I hope there’s been something for you to learn back home. Thank you, guys. — Thank you.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Improve your English the CRAZY way!!!

{“en”:”Hi, there. Are you having problems or difficulties, or do you find it difficult to practice speaking English? Maybe you live in a country where nobody around you speaks English, or you’re the only person you know that speaks English. I’ve got some advice for you. So, how to help you improve your speaking or your talking in English. Goin’ crazy. Usually in English, we never say: “going” or “trying”. We say: “goin'”. So, any time in English you see this, we’re actually missing the “g”. So, probably you should say: “Going crazy trying to speak or practice English”.

But, in slang when regular speech, we say: “Goin’ crazy tryin’ to speak or practice English”. So, I want you to think about one thing. Crazy people, there’s one right here. I’m crazy, little bit. But when I say “crazy people”, I mean people who are mentally disturbed or have something really wrong with their brain. And we like to categorize people as being crazy, but they really are not insane. They just make crazy noises. So if someone is considered crazy, what do they do? Crazy people usually talk to themselves, they hear voices, especially if they’re psychotic, and they will take to anyone or everyone that will listen to them. So, my advice to you, secret number 42 of how to speak English, is act like you’re crazy, or just go crazy learning English.

The first one: crazy people talk to themselves. You are going to talk to yourself. If you want to really put… Bring this off and do it well, you could go on the bus [giggles] or on any kind of trans… Public transportation, go on the street in your city and just talk to yourself on the street. I don’t really recommend that. If you want to do that, you can. But talk to yourself, but record it. So when you do this, you’re actually listening to your English so you can catch your mistakes and you can listen to your pronunciation. And, really, what do you sound like in English? So, rule number one: you’re going to talk to yourself, but you’re going to record it so you can check your mistakes and you can see just how well you do speak. Because I bet you, you speak better than you think. Next one: crazy people talk about hearing voices. Now, I know you inside have a voice. You, like I, have an inner being, a voice inside your head.

Crazy people are known to have more than one voice. If you have this, you might want to seek some help. But when you hear voices, I want you to talk to yourself inside your head in English. When I lived in Japan, I learned to speak Japanese. I didn’t take a course. I don’t like studying. But my inner voice spoke to me in Japanese. So I would come back to Canada or I would go travelling, and I would actually speak to people who spoke English, they would ask me a question, I would answer them in Japanese because my inner voice was still talking to me in Japanese.

So, one really, really important and great thing that you can do is make your inside voice speak to you in English. This sounds crazy, but I guarantee you that it’s one of the ways that you know if you are coming actually bilingual (means you can speak two languages) or trilingual. So, if your inside voice can talk to you in two different languages, this is really amazing, and it means that your English is improving. Everyone has a different timeline. Some people can do this within a year, some people within months, some people it takes three or four years to do this, but once you have achieved this, woohoo, you’re almost there. And the last one: you’ll notice that if you see crazy people on the subway or you see crazy people in your city, they’re going to talk to any or… This means “or”, by the way. Everyone. They don’t care who it is. They’re not going to be picky and go: “I don’t want to talk to that person. I want to talk to everyone.” So, the more people that you can speak to in English, the better.

You don’t have to be picky. That means you don’t have to choose. Is it a beautiful girl? A handsome boy? Young people, old people, babies, children. Anyone that you know that speaks English, try and talk to them. Even in your country, you think: “Ronnie, there’s no one in my country that speaks English”, you might be surprised. You can find people on websites, and you can find other English speakers to talk to. So, go crazy, speak as much as you can, and learn English with me. I’m Ronnie, and I’m crazy. Good bye.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Answering Your Questions on Learning English (Part 2) – Can You Understand This Real Conversation?

{“en”:”- Favorite thing in the whole world. – Hello everybody. This is Jack and… – Kate. – from ToFluency.com. Welcome to this live lesson here on YouTube. We are going to answer your questions about learning English, and if you have any questions, please ask us, whether you’re here live or watching the replay. Kate, what should they do (laughs) if they are new here? – Subscribe. – Subscribe. If you are new, subscribe and turn on notifications because we release conversations talking about different topics in English now on a regular basis, right? – Yes, uh-huh. – And I’ve left a link to all those conversations in the description. So, I’m just going to say goodbye to Facebook. Come join us on YouTube. Okay.

So, so, so, so… What have we done so far today, just to give people some context? – Sure. Well, we woke up at about five o’clock because– – Yeah. – Yeah. It’s actually been a long morning despite the fact that it’s not that late, and I then went back to sleep. (laughs) – You went back to sleep, which is very nice. – It was extremely nice, and then we had a babysitter come over to spend some time with our son and daughter, and we went and got coffee. – Yup. What kind of coffee did you get? – I got my first gingerbread latte of the season. – Your first one? – Yes. – Oh yeah, because normally you get the pumpkin spice. – Yes, pumpkin spice season is over.

It’s gingerbread latte season now. – Oh, that’s interesting. I just got a regular coffee with cream. Look at all these people joining online. – Oh wonderful, that’s exciting. – If you are watching live or watching the replay, please hit that like button so more people can find this. I’m just going to read some of the comments, and let’s see if I can do this. If we slide over a little bit Kate, other way. (laughs) There we go. So, we can read some comments live. – Okay. Hold on, let me just- – And everyone watching live can see them too. So, come say hi and tell me where you are watching from. Also, leave your questions in the live chat too. Adam, “Give us good free solutions to learn English.” – Ooh, that’s a good one. – So, free ways to learn English. – Well, one of the free ways is obviously just what we’re doing right now.

The more that you tune in to free content on YouTube, and other, and Facebook is a great way to get some practice listening and speaking. – Yeah, could you just lower your chair a little bit. (laughs) – I was just thinking that. I was just thinking, “I’m taller than you, and I kind of like it.” (laughs) – Yeah, I know you do. – I’ll put my chair down. I know. – Yeah, so listen. Listen as much as possible. – Okay, the elevator is going down. – You ready? That’s better, isn’t it? So yeah, listen as much as possible.

Watch English lessons on YouTube, but also watch things that aren’t made for English learners. – Yes. – In a way, I want you to go find other podcasts and YouTube videos where you can listen to anything that you’re interested in, and I think a good idea, as well, is to learn in English. – Yes, and that’s absolutely been proven true. If you’re both learning new content and English at the same time, that strengthens everything. It just helps your brain make the connections. And also, when you switch to regular content that’s made for English speakers, sometimes the pace is a little bit fast, the vocabulary is more rich or specific, there’s more jargon, so sometimes you just have to just be a little bit patient with that and repeat.

Pick out phrases that you think are interesting. I told you what I think my number one trait in successful English learners is, curiosity. I think that that is just the most important thing to learn anything. You have to be curious. You have to wonder about things, ask yourself questions, and then as you experience English, you can kind of start to fill in the blanks and learn. – What do you think the number one trait is in English learners? – To really want to learn. – To want to learn, yeah. – Because I’ve talked about, in the past, how if you say you’re too busy to learn English, a better way to frame that is to say, “It’s not one of my priorities right now.” And this could be a good thing or a bad thing. If you have children, that’s more of a priority, but a lot of the time, we can always do more.

And if you really want to do something and if you love doing it, then you’re going to do it. You’re going to find the time to do it. – Just thinking about that, I have some knowledge of Spanish and a little bit of French, and I want to continue learning, and I think that right now, our children are probably my number one barrier because I can’t just sit down, and find content, and learn online the way that I did before we had Thomas and Emma, who are our kids. But at the same time, maybe we can look for resources so that we can learn together. I just found some apps on my phone that I’ve been sharing with Thomas, and we’ve been kind of learning together at the same time, which is really neat. – Yes, yes. I have mentioned this before too when it comes to… If you have children, then watch TV shows in English. You need to find time to study and exercise. – Yes, (laughs) that’s multitasking. I’m not sure that I could do that.

(laughs) I’m very impressed. – Yeah, that such a great comment. I’m going to bring the comments up again. We’ll go through some of them quite quickly now. “I like the interaction of live lessons,” says Mariam. “I’m curious, Katy.” – Uh-oh. – (laughs) Let’s see what else other people are saying. “I don’t have anyone to have conversations with, so can you give me a suggestion?” This one here. “I can learn to speak English by myself. “Is it possible?” – Ooh, good questions. – Well, I have a method for this if you go to ToFluency.com/speaking. There will be a link in the description too. Because there are two main ways you can improve your speaking. Obviously, we need to learn grammar and vocabulary, but there’s natural practice, and then there’s something that I call the LRRC method. Do you know what that stands for? – Oh, my goodness. I’m on the spot here. – Sorry, I put Kate on the spot.

– No, no, I should know. I’m sorry. – Listen to a phrase, repeat it, record yourself repeating it, and then compare your version to the original, and then you get long-term repetition too, so you can improve your speaking from anywhere in the world. And a lot of people complain that they don’t have anyone to practice with, but you can do online language exchanges, you can pay a teacher to have a conversation with you, and make friends. – True. – Make friends. – Yeah. – Yeah. – Cool. Let’s go back to the comments. “Do you speak Arabic?” – I do not. – Do you speak Persian? – No, I do not. – (speaks in foreign language). (both laugh) – Jack has a very dear friend who is originally from Iran, and we tried to learn some phrases to surprise him, but I think we just confused him. (laughs) – Yeah, he didn’t understand what I was saying, unfortunately. “Do you have any idea about English films or series?” – Ooh. – I guess maybe a suggestion for people who want to learn English through movies or TV.

– Ooh, that’s an interesting one. I think I might have to think about that a little bit more, but if anybody’s had any TV shows or films that have really helped them, feel free to chime in. – Yeah, chime in to leave a comment in this situation. Yeah, what are we watching at the moment? – Well, we’re still watching Stranger Things. – Yeah. It only came out about a month ago, the second season. – But I like to do something called binge watching because the end of an episode always ends on a little bit of a cliffhanger, so the characters are in trouble, or something’s about to happen and you want to know what happens next, so I tend to sit down and just watch episode after episode, and then come back to it the next day. You can kind of space it out a little bit more, but life has just been a little bit hectic. We haven’t been able to watch TV as much as possible. – No. Yeah, so episodes end on a cliffhanger, which means it’s like in the middle of a story, an important part of it, and you really want to know what happens next.

– I’m excited. There’s a new series out on Amazon called Victoria. – Is it similar to Elizabeth? – The Crown, yes. – The Crown, right. – And there’s another season of that too, which I like that. I tend to like historical… – Historical shows. – Shows, yes. – Yeah, they’re fun. Let’s see. “I tried to do a language exchange, “but many people don’t correct you.” Oh, Esther is here. Esther is a long-time viewer. – Hello, Esther. – I think from Argentina. Let me know if that’s not correct. Some people are talking in French. “I can see what a beautiful day in your city.” What is the weather like today? – Beautiful. – Beautiful. – You’re correct. – Yeah, sunny. It’s warm. – Yeah, it is. It’s very warm. – For this time of year, yeah. “Watching movies can help us a lot as well.” – I prefer a TV series because you get more repetition in the language, and movies can be very artistic, and the dialogue is very quiet at times. It can be more difficult.

But I think TV series, it’s more conversational, especially when you think about something like Friends, everyday English. There’s so much in there. Denise is here. Good to see you, Denise. “What do you think about reading “classic books to improve English?” This is your topic. – Yes, this is something I’m really passionate about because I was an English literature teacher for several years. And I think that reading is a really interesting way to improve your vocabulary because there’s just so much richer language in novels, so novels are generally a much higher Lexile level than we speak in conversation. However, that can be a little bit of a trap in terms of your conversational English because, a lot of times, there is vocabulary in literature and grammar structures that we don’t actually use in everyday speech.

– Fantastic. – So, I think that reading is a wonderful way to improve your vocabulary, but it doesn’t always translate into speaking. One way to kind of get around this when you have enough of a level in English is to look into audiobooks, and the Lexile level is obviously the same, but you’ll actually get a sense of the rhythm of the language when it’s spoken, and so that can help. Yes. – Sorry, Lexile level? – Yes. – Explain. – It’s just basically, it’s kind of an arbitrary– Not arbitrary, but it’s a measure of the level of vocabulary, the complexity of the language, and the way that it’s used. – It’s just like how hard the book is. – How hard it is, and higher is not always better. – I agree, I agree. I made a video on comparing… I think it was maybe Pride and Prejudice with the original version and the graded reader, and a graded reader is an adaption of a book for English learners. – Yeah, so an adaptation that’s made just for English learners? – Exactly. And a lot of the time, if someone is an English learner…

And maybe you have felt like this too that, “Oh, I don’t want something that is adapted,” but it is very useful for English. – One thing, which is actually… I will completely admit this. I read a lot when I was younger, and so I had a vocabulary level that was a lot higher than my speaking level, if that makes sense. – It does. – And English is one of the only languages where we borrow from so many different languages, and there’s no standard English pronunciation, which I’m sure you have figured out, so when an English person or a native English speaker reads a word for the first time, they don’t know how to pronounce it, necessarily. – Exactly. – So, it’s interesting because we take pronunciation rules from so many different languages, which I think is really fascinating. So when I was little, I would mispronounce words a lot, especially longer words that I’d never heard used before, and so that’s one way to tell that people have learned a lot from reading, even native speakers. – Very good. That’s such a good point on audiobooks. So, let’s have a look. Let’s do some more questions.

– Ooh, are there any questions that are less about learning and more personal? Or not personal, but… – Oh, yeah. Yeah, feel free to ask us anything. – Within reason. – Within reason. – Yeah. Let’s answer some of these quickly now. So, (mumbles) “How writing should be used to improve English?” Or how can you improve your writing? I think write as much as possible, and I like a method where you copy. – Oh, okay. – So, you take a book, or an article, or a conversation, and you just copy it. – Copy it, okay. – Imagine drinking some tea with classical music and just copying. It’s nice and relaxed. – I think I’m really into the tea and the classical music, so that kind of connects the dots.

Actually, writing is really neat, the way that it can help you learn and reinforce what you’re learning because when you write, you’re using your body in a way that helps you make those connections. So actually, when you’re writing, you can have more deep, complex thoughts than you can without writing it down, so writing is a tool that helps us kind of go deeper into our thoughts and realize things, so as an English learner, if you just sit down and try to write in English, you will actually kind of help yourself learn the language a little bit more deeply.

So, when I was teaching middle schoolers, I would always have them… There’s two different ways to think about it. It’s writing to learn and learning to write, and so obviously, these two go together, but a lot of times, when you’re just writing in a way where you’re not worried about grammar or spelling, you’re just getting the words onto the page, that’s helping you learn at a deeper level. – Yeah, I love that. I write something every day for a good– – You do? – I journal. – You journal? Oh, neat. – Yeah, yeah. – I did not know that about you. I honestly didn’t know. – I do, I’ve journaled for two years every day, and I’m just going to show you what it’s like. – I promise, we’re actually married. We do know each other. (both laugh) – Look, Thoughts. I’ve just got this thing called Thoughts, and I just write my thoughts every day. – Is there a thought that you could share? – Yeah, okay. This is on the 23rd of November. “235 pounds on the dead lift. “Felt great, getting heavier and heavier. “Got four, will add five pounds next week.” Just very simple, but just talking about my progress in the gym, all those different types of things.

What? (Kate laughs) Kate’s prodding me. She’s pushing me, and I don’t know why. (laughs) – It’s the light. – Well yeah, so you want me to… – To come forward just a cinch. – Yeah, okay. (Kate laughs) So, Kate kept pushing me. (laughs) That reminds me of… I won’t say your specific example, but there are so many times in a restaurant or a bar, and I’m telling a story and Kate pinches me. (Kate laughs) It’s a pinch under the table, and I say, “Why are you pinching me?” But she’s doing that so I stop saying something. – Telling the story. Because usually you’re telling some story that’s really embarrassing for me, and so I’m like, “Jack, stop telling this story, stop.” But inevitably, instead of stopping, you turn around and go, “Why are you pinching me?” (laughs) – Exactly, exactly, when I should just stop saying what I’m saying.

– (laughs) Well, I think I also maybe need to be a little bit less sensitive. – Right. Shall we go quickly? – Okay. – “When will you guys go live again?” – Ooh. – Maybe next week? – Yeah, maybe – “What do you think about reading the Harry Potter books to improve vocabulary?” – I am all for it. (laughs) – I have never read a Harry Potter book. – You know what? I think that we will read them with our son eventually because they’re great, and I really like the way that JK Rowling, she uses the English language in really interesting ways. So, everything that she names that’s imaginary is really kind of clever. – Very good. “You use pounds?” So yeah, I was talking about pounds for weight.

I do now, because in the UK, we use usually stone but kilograms too, but I’m used to pounds now. – In my head, whenever you say stones, I’m like, “What stones?” – It’s confusing. – Like, I’m trying to imagine an actual stone. – Well, it’s like cups in America for measuring things. But yeah, here’s a great phrase. I used to use pounds, but now I am used to… No, I used to use kilograms, but now I’m used to pounds. Used, use, used, use. I made a video on that as well. I’ll leave a link below. “Could… (laughs) “Could Kate beat you up?” (Kate laughs) Probably. You’re very feisty. – I am feisty, but I don’t know if I could beat you up. I don’t think I would want to, in any event. – “How to get rid of shyness when speaking English?” – That’s hard. – Get out of your comfort zone, I say, little by little. I was so nervous about making videos at first, and I made a video and shared it with a few people, but you have to make that effort to get out of your comfort zone, to do something that’s a little bit uncomfortable, and then you can build on that, and it soon becomes normal.

– I have a couple of ideas as well to help that because that’s something that I really struggle with too, especially in foreign languages. And my first suggestion is to just try to make it a situation where you feel the most comfortable speaking. So, if you’re somebody that really likes to have kind of quiet conversations, see if you can find a language exchange. If you’re somebody that’s comfortable in crowds, maybe join in a YouTube conversation or a language community to practice speaking.

And then, this is actually something that really doesn’t apply to everyone, but if you are somebody who does drink alcohol or feels comfortable drinking alcohol, they actually came out with a study that you speak better in a foreign language when you’ve had a drink or two, and I think that’s because… And this is true for everybody. There’s inhibitions. We’re kind of held back from speaking in a foreign language, and alcohol lowers that just a little. So, it’s not necessary by any means, but that is something that you can try. Like, you think that you’re speaking better, and you might actually be speaking better. – Yeah, because your confidence increases too, definitely. And a lot of the time, people don’t speak because they’re worried about making mistakes. It’s so common that people stop themselves from speaking because they don’t want to make those mistakes, and I felt this in a huge way in Spain where you don’t want to talk about things. But also– – And sometimes, you actually are making mistakes, and that’s okay too.

– Exactly. – And those are the funniest stories. I’m not sure if I’ve told this story before, but when we were living in Spain, I went to get new contact lenses for my eyes, and basically, I went in and I said that I needed “lentejas,” which are lentils, little tiny beans. I was like, “I need lentils to put in my eyes.” And I’m so glad that I had the confidence to just go in and ask because it’s the funniest story now. But you know, when you think about it in your head, what’s the worst that could happen? – Yeah, definitely. – You have a funny story. – And we don’t care if someone makes a mistake. – Oh, not at all. I think that the fear in your head is 100 times greater, and you think that people are so worried about you making mistakes, but the reality is that most of that is just in your head. Nobody cares as much as you do, if that helps.

– Very good. Israel says, “Listening is very hard for me.” Kate mentioned something before, which is repetition, and I’m going to start talking about repetition a lot. Do you understand? (laughs) – You’re going to repeat and repeat? – Yeah, exactly. I’m going to keep repeating– – Keep repeating. (laughs) – how important repetition is because it is vital. So, what I want everyone to do as well is to watch this lesson again because you’ll understand so much more the second time. – And just something that can help with listening, especially if you find reading easier, is to watch things with subtitles, not in your language but in English.

And sometimes your brain will translate that back, but that’s a way of reinforcing the language, and then eventually you can get to the point where you take the subtitles away and you just listen to the language on the screen and help your brain make those connections. I have found that really helpful in the past. – So, here is a good strategy. You can watch it the first time without, second time with, and then without. – Or two times with and two times without, but that progression from with English subtitles to no subtitles can be really helpful. And a lot of times you know a word because you’ve read it, but you don’t know how it sounds in conversation, especially with relaxed pronunciation where the words kind of go together, et cetera.

– “I’m gonna wanna to go soon.” – Yes. – “I’m gonna wanna to go.” – Oh, I thought you meant right now. (laughs) – No, no, that was an example. – I was like, “Okay, okay, we’re ready, let’s go.” – I was very relaxed. I’ve got an answer for this. Breezy day, “What is the hardest thing “about English grammar?” What’s the hardest part of English grammar? For me, English grammar isn’t hard or easy. It’s just whether you have had repetition with it because people say irregular verbs are hard, but everyone here, I’m sure, can say “I am, you are, he is.” That’s an irregular verb, but you say this all the time, therefore you can use it. And it’s the same with phrasal verbs. I imagine people can say, “I wake up, I wake up at” because of the repetition of this.

And that’s what I teach in my method, so go to ToFluency.com/speaking to learn more about this. There’ll be a link below. “Use subtitles in YouTube, I do also.” Yeah, I add the subtitles to most videos because I know how important it is. (laughs) I don’t know what you’re laughing about. – I don’t know. – (laughs) I’m laughing too. Valdinei, “I have just shared your video on my Facebook.” – Thank you. – Thank you so much. Yeah, if you are enjoying this, then please share it. You can also, you know, on YouTube, you can share it through messenger or your messages, or WhatsApp, so you can send it to individual people too.

“Do you want your children to learn another language?” – Yes, very much so, and I think that this is just going to be an ongoing process because we had intentions to help our son by raising him bilingually in Spanish and English. But even though we had that intention, it hasn’t quite turned out that way, so we’re just continually working to try to expose him to different languages and to work with that because that is such a gift to be able to speak another language, not only to communicate with everyone else, but also just to have a brain that can understand other cultures and other ways of thinking about the world and speaking. – Yeah, so Kate used a few good phrases there.

It hasn’t turned out that way, which means like… How would you explain “turn out”? – “Turn out”? Just the end result. – The end result, perfect. I need you here. (both laugh) So yeah, the end result at the moment isn’t what we intended in the past, but there’s still time. And he is learning English. Sorry, Spanish, at school. – He is. – Because he says, “Buenos dias,” doesn’t he? – He does, it’s adorable. – Sometimes, “Uno, dos, tres.” Someone had a question. “Do you guys have any habit phrases “that you use a lot in conversation?” In my program, the ToFluency program, that’s what I give you, over 1000 fluency phrases that we use. They’re from the conversations that we have, and I give them to you in audio format and also as memory cards, memory cards so that you can get that repetition.

– Like flash cards? – Yeah. – Cool. – I call them memory cards. Maybe I should change that name. – That’s okay. – Also, if you can think of a better name for the LRRC method, let me know. – (laughs) Okay. – Yousef, “The first time I’ve joined your channel.” Thank you so much for being here. If you are new here, subscribe and click that notification bell. So, Dylan is here. “Love your lessons. “I’ve studied in Australia for more than two years.

“Most of the time, I stay here except for the holidays.” You’ve been to Australia. – I have. – Yeah, I want to go. “How can I be fluent in English without phrasal verbs?” – Just… – I think it’s… To be honest, phrasal verbs end up being a big part of fluency. – “End up.” – Yes, for example. (laughs) So, it’s just something to keep working on and to be curious about like, “Oh, that’s an interesting way to use that verb,” and just to remember it and to be open to it. It’s like, is there… I don’t know if there’s a name for this phenomenon, but once you’re aware of something, you see it everywhere.

– Confirmation bias, right? – Oh, it that what it’s called? – Oh, I think that’s … No, conversation bias is when you are looking for anything that supports your argument, so I guess it’s true. It’s similar, isn’t it? But it’s like when you get a new car, you’re looking at other cars. You get new shoes, you’re looking at everyone’s– – You see everyone else’s shoes. You get new phrasal verbs, you hear them everywhere. (laughs) – Yeah, definitely. “I feel bored with memory cards. “Is it okay for me to keep the LRRC method without it?” Definitely. The other thing with memory cards is delete the ones… If a card is boring, it means you know it, so delete it, and then you can use the ones that will help you. – Yes. – Got some nice comments. – Woo-hoo, thank you. – “Recommend to improve pronunciation, “Listen and try to repeat several times?” Yeah, and record yourself because then you can notice the differences between how you say it and how the original audio says it too. And then, it’s important to know the sounds and how to make them, and this is inside the ToFluency program too. – And that’s part of that confidence too.

And actually, sometimes when I hear my own recorded voice, I think, “Oh no, it that what I sound like?” Because in my head, I just sound so confident and so… – Sassy. – Sassy and so, I don’t know, so grown up, and then I hear my voice, and to me, it sounds like, you know, not that way. And so, but the more that you speak and the more that you hear your voice recorded, just like I’ll hear this voice recorded, you build your confidence. – “The way you speak is beautiful,” Khadija. – Thank you. (laughs) – Yeah, and also, you do sound different when it’s recorded. – Yes, your recorded voice is different. – Yeah, it is. But I’m also… I talked about this in the car. I don’t know if you were listening, but– (laughs) – How rude. I always listen to you.

(laughs) – I bought some courses on Black Friday to help me improve my speaking voice. – In Spanish? – No, English. – Oh, okay. See, everybody’s learning. (both laugh) – Yeah, but it’s more about the way you speak and breathe, and like coming from the diaphragm, and I’ve learned that there are different types of voices. There’s the nasal voice, the throat voice. – The throat voice. – The chest voice. – The chest voice. – And then, the diaphragm voice. – The diaphragm voice. (laughs) – Kate can’t do it. – I need to take the course. (laughs) – But it’s really interesting. And also, they have different warmup exercises for your mouth. – They don’t say “Benedict Cumberbatch”? – Benedict Cumberbatch, Benedict Cumberbatch. – I love it. (laughs) – What is that article? – If you are not familiar with the work of this very talented actor from Great Britain, he also has one of the most ridiculous names, and if you Google it, you will see all of the ways that people have messed it up, and I love it. – He’s from Sherlock. That’s how most people– – Know him. – He’s Sherlock Holmes. Margarida, who is a ToFluency program member, “I love memory cards.” – Oh, great.

– Yeah, and also, you can make them enjoyable if you have fun with them because you get a flash card, and if you just read, it’s boring, but if you repeat it and say it with some enthusiasm, an intonation, stress, then you’ll enjoy it, but also you’ll improve too. – Are you speaking from your diaphragm right now? – No. No, I need to practice. So you breathe in for five seconds, and then you hum. (both hum) Deeper. (Kate hums) – I’ll make a video on it. – Okay. – Basma, “Do you know, “I found formal English, it’s too hard.

“It’s harder than slang words.” Interesting. – Yeah, interesting. – Here’s a quick question. What is a new slang term that you have learned recently? – Oh, my gosh. I feel like I’m constantly learning slang terms and also abbreviations. – Abbreviations? – Mm-hmm. Like, for the longest time, I didn’t know that SMH stood for “shake my head,” so when you’re feeling– – You asked me that.

– I did. (laughs) – Yeah, and I think I– – Jack knows more about those kinds of things, so I just never knew what people were talking to. It means, like (sighs). – Have you listened or watched any videos from young YouTubers or Instagram people? – No. – Because that’s how you learn, and it confuses me. Everyone says “bro” these days. – “Bro”? – “Bro” or “bruh.” – “Bruh.” Or “Bae.” – Or “bae,” yeah. It’s quite crazy. “Is it a problem if we mix British with American English?” I don’t think so. – I guess we kind of do it all the time. – I do it all the– I don’t know which one is which anymore. – Yes. (laughs) – And because I have lived in America with kids, but I haven’t lived in the UK with kids, then there are certain terms that I don’t know what they are in British English.

– Yeah, or you know them, but you don’t use them. – It sound strange. – Like pacifier instead of dummy or crib instead of cot. – Diaper instead of– – What do you say? – Nappy. – Oh yeah. That’s neat. – Stroller and a pram. We’ll make a video on that. Hello to Indonesia. “Do you have any grammar lessons?” I do, and I have another one coming on Thursday. The difference between “will be going to” and the present continuous.

– Ooh, that’s one of my favorites. – (laughs) Really? Have you seen it? It’s very good. It’s the one where you criticize my hair hypothetically. – (laughs) I don’t criticize your hair. – No, but the hypothetical one. “I’d love to join your program, “but I still don’t have my blue card, payment card.” Just get in touch when you get that. – In the meantime, there’s a lot of resources that are available on YouTube and on Jack’s website too. – Definitely. ToFluency.com/speaking. I should give away some free memory cards. Do you think so? – Yeah, to give people a taste of kind of what’s inside your course? I think that would be a great idea. And to see whether the method is a good fit for what they need to practice speaking. – Yeah, definitely, definitely. Well, shall we wrap it up? – Yes. – We have another conversation coming very soon, next week. So again, if you’re new, please subscribe and click the notification bell, so then you’ll get an email from YouTube.

Do you get notified from my channel, Kate? – I do. – Yeah? As soon as you see the notification, do you swipe and watch the video? If you’re in it? (laughs) – Well… Yeah, and I think if anyone has– Because we probably did not get to all the questions, so if you have– And if you have any questions that you haven’t typed in, feel free to leave them and we’ll try to address those questions in our next video. – Oh, and do you want to ask a question for everyone, Kate’s question? – Yes. Because we’ve been speaking a lot about speaking, is there any English phrase, for whatever reason, that you particularly like to say? – I love that.

– Like, your favorite phrase to say in English. – It’s the one that you have in Spanish. – I’ll have to think about that. – We used to like saying “es que” all the time, “es que, bueno, es que.” (both laugh) What else did we used to like to say? – Let me think. I remember in Valencia, everyone used to say “mira.” – “Mira.” – “Mira,” like “look.” (laughs) It was something that was said with some attitude, and I really enjoyed saying that. I think I had a little bit of a different personality sometimes when I spoke in Spanish. – Definitely. – I was much more assertive, much more aggressive, and so maybe you’ll find that you have a secret English personality when you speak English a lot, which is different from your language. – Yeah, and that’s a really good point. Find your personality and be that personality when you speak in English. It’s a great opportunity to… – Be someone new. – Be someone new. And obviously, you’re still the same person, but just a little bit different. Okay. Everybody, if you have enjoyed this… Go on, Kate. What should they do? (laughs) – Subscribe. – Subscribe, like, share, and answer Kate’s question, which is, “Is there a particular phrase “that you like using in English?” Something that you just enjoy.

– Or a word that you think sounds really cool? (laughs) – Yeah, and please let me know if you have learned any new slang terms recently because I’m learning too. Fantastic. And if you want to watch more lessons, then I’ll leave some on your screen now. Thank you so much for being here. We’ll see you in the next conversation. Bye for now.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Learn English with Alex

{“en”:”Hey guys. I’m Alex. Thanks for clicking on my channel. If you’re here, it’s probably because you’re interested in improving your English in some way. You’ve come to the right place. Down below, you will find many videos about English grammar, English vocabulary, pronunciation, writing skills, speaking skills, and a wide variety of things related to the English language. So if you never want to miss a video, please subscribe to my channel and I’ll always be here! Thanks, guys. Good luck, and take care!. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Learn English Speaking American Pronunciation Lesson 2 with Steve Ford

{“en”:”Hello! Hello! Hello Everybody! My name is Steve Ford and welcome to today our two words that are very similar in pronunciation are look and Luke They sound kind of similar but there are some differences so let’s take a look under the English speaking microscope to see what’s going on so for Luke we have the “ew” sound and I’ve explained in other Youtube lessons that “ew” is the sound that we make here in North America if we see something disgusting Ew!!! That’s gross! Ew!!!!!!!!!!! that’s also the same sound in boot or suit so you wanna say “Lu”, there’s that “ew” sound, “Lu” so Luke, now if we go to “look”, this sound gives a lot of people a lot of problems and that sound is you can hear other words like book, took can you hear the difference? now to make things more challenging for some of you very advanced students out there and I mean super-advanced in American English often they won’t pronounce the consonant at the end of the word, so they’ll say and this is what makes it even more difficult because we actually don’t pronounce the entire word we drop the “K”, Loo(k) so I’m gonna add one more word into the mix here and that word is tuque a hat that we wear here in the winter in Canada so you could say, “look, Luke took my tuque” now that’s hard OK so let’s do the Learn English Speaking Quiz (to) see if you understand everything that I’ve explained today and I will post the answers for this quiz in our next Learn English Speaking Lesson Bye for now!”}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Parts of Speech: Nouns, Pronouns, Determiners – English Grammar Review (1/3)

{“en”:”Hi everyone. It’s Jennifer. Since I’m an English teacher, it won’t surprise you to know that I love grammar. But I know that many others don’t love this subject. In fact, some people react very negatively to grammar terminology. So starting off this lesson immediately with examples of determiners and noun modifiers won’t excite the majority of you. So let’s try to ease into this grammar lesson, okay? Tell me what’s the best vacation you ever had? Here are some photos from one of my more recent family vacations. Do you recognize any of the places? People say that a picture is worth a thousand words, and while it’s true that an image can be very powerful, photos can’t completely replace daily communication like email and phone calls. And no university professor is going to accept a photo instead of a written essay, just as no boss is going to accept a series of photos instead of a written report.

We have to use words like these And we have to put them in the right order to build sentences. Understanding syntax, helps me build this sentence: Last summer my family visited a few national parks in South Dakota and Wyoming Knowing how to put words in the proper order is called syntax If you want to be effective in your communication, take the time to learn syntax. To help you, I’m going to review all the parts of speech in English. We’ll break each category down, and I’ll give plenty of examples.

This lesson will be about how words function in a sentence. If you understand the function of a word, you’ll be more confident about the word order in every sentence you say or write. Let’s start. I don’t want to overwhelm you with terminology, so we’ll break this lesson into three parts. In part one, we’ll talk about nouns, pronouns, and determiners. In part two, we’ll look at verbs, adjectives, and conjunctions. In part three, we’ll look at adverbs, prepositions, and interjections. I should note that some sources don’t include determiners. That’s why you may hear about eight parts of speech rather than nine. I feel determiners are important, and I’d like you to understand what they are and what they do, so I’m including determiners in my list. Let’s begin our review. Every conversation is about something or someone. We need to talk about people and things, so we use nouns. Nouns are the subjects of our sentences. Nouns can be people, places, animals, or things — either concrete or abstract. As subjects, nouns can begin a sentence. Proper nouns are names of specific people and things. Proper nouns must be capitalized. Common nouns are names of everyday things.

These nouns are not capitalized. Here’s another way to look at nouns. They can either be countable or uncountable. This is important to understand because the number of things influences other word forms in a sentence. Here’s a quick check. Can you sort the nouns into two groups, countable and uncountable? Here are the answers. If you need more practice, you can watch my lessons on countable and uncountable nouns. I’ll put the links in the video description. If a noun is countable, we can use either the singular or plural form. Plural nouns can be either regular or irregular. I’ll include a link to an odor lesson that I have on the pronunciation of regular plural endings -s and -es. “Tourists” is an example of a regular plural noun. “Buffalo” is an example of an irregular plural noun. We can also talk about collective nouns. They refer to a group, but collective nouns function as singular nouns. At least, that’s true of American English.

“Family” is a good example. We haven’t talked about all the parts of speech yet, but I need to state briefly now that nouns can also function as objects. That means that nouns can also follow verbs and prepositions. The object of a verb is called a direct object. The object of a preposition is called an indirect object. When we speak or write at length we don’t usually repeat the same noun over and over again: Buffalo are large animals. Buffalo can run very fast, and when buffalo run, buffalo are very dangerous. That sounded wordy, right? Instead we use pronouns. Pronouns are words that replace nouns, so we sound less repetitive. We can only use pronouns when the reference is clear. So first we use a noun, and as we continue to speak or write, we can refer back to that person or thing with a pronoun Pronouns can be subjects or objects, just like nouns. Let’s talk about personal pronouns first.

Subject pronouns are: Object pronouns are: We also have possessive pronouns: Can you identify the types of pronouns I’m using? Do you understand what each pronoun refers back to? Look. Here’s an interesting note: The subject pronoun IT doesn’t always refer back to something. IT can be a “dummy” subject. It’s just a placeholder. Sometimes we need the subject pronoun to make a statement about something that simply is It’s three o’clock. It’s cold outside. It’s time to go. We also have reflexive pronouns: And we have demonstrative pronouns: Demonstrative pronouns can easily function as subjects or objects: This is fun. I love this. But reflexive pronouns are a bit different. They can be objects. For example: Reflexive pronouns can also help us emphasize a subject For example: Do you know what reciprocal pronouns are? Don’t worry. If you don’t know the term.

I bet you know these pronouns. It’s a very short list. each other / one another Reciprocal pronouns help us explain actions that are given and received equally. For instance: And finally, we have relative pronouns, like who, which, and that. I hope you’ve watched my series on adjective clauses to understand how relative pronouns function within a sentence. Okay. We’ve covered nouns and pronouns. Let’s take the time to talk about determiners. Before I start naming different determiners, let me show you some more photos from my family vacation. Determiners tend to be short words that help us determine what or who we’re talking about. We place a determiner before a noun. Determiners include articles. numbers and quantifiers, demonstrative determiners, and possessive determiners. Articles include the indefinite article and the definite article. As for the indefinite article, remember we use A before consonant sound and AN before a vowel sound. As for the definite article, we say THE (“thuh”) before a consonant sound and the (“thee”) before a vowel sound. Sometimes we use no article, so we can talk about a zero article.

I have a series of lessons on articles, so you may want to check out the video description for those links. Numbers and quantifiers help us talk about how much or how many? Some quantifiers can only be used with countable nouns like MANY and SEVERAL. Other quantifiers can only be used with uncountable nouns like MUCH and A LITTLE. Demonstrative determiners are also called demonstrative adjectives. You know these words: this, that, these, those. Remember we use THIS and THESE for things that are close to us in time or space. We use THAT and THOSE for things that are more distant. We’ve already talked about THAT, THIS, THESE, and THOSE as pronouns, so you can see that some words fit into more than one word class Finally, we have possessive determiners, which some call possessive adjectives. They include: Help me build some sentences with determiners.

Put the missing words in the right place. Note that once we put a determiner together with a noun, we have a phrase. A phrase is a group of words that functions as a unit in a sentence. For example, we can have a noun phrase. That noun phrase can be a subject or an object. For example, in sentence 1 “my daughter” is the object of a preposition. Okay. I think that’s a pretty good start. We’ll continue with more parts of speech in part two. If you’re eager to continue this grammar lesson, please like this video. As always, thanks for watching and happy studies! Become a sponsor of English with Jennifer. You’ll get a special badge, bonus posts, on-screen credit, and a monthly live stream. Click on the link or look in the video description for more information. Note that sponsorships are not available in every country at this time Join me on my YouTube community tab for special posts each week. If you haven’t already, please subscribe to my channel. That way you’ll get notification of every new video I upload to YouTube.”}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London