100 School Words | Learn English Pronunciation | Practice Drill

{“en”:”Hello guys! My name is Fanny. Welcome to this pronunciation drill. Watch this video if you want to improve your pronunciation very quickly. And in today’s video, I have 100 words on school. All the words that you need to know. Now, don’t forget, it’s very important to for you to repeat after me. Let’s get started. Thank you guys. I’m sure you do a great job. If you think the video went too fast, or you want to do it again, Please, do it again! Watch the video over and over. Don’t stop practicing. Practice will make you better. Also you can watch my other pronunciation drills. They will be very helpful if you want to improve your pronunciation skills. See you next time! Thank you guys so much for watching my video. If you’ve liked it, please show me your support. Click ‘like’.

Subscribe to the channel. Put your comments below. And share the video. See you!. “}

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Neuro Linguistic Programming in Brighton

English Conversation Study in COLORADO – American English

{“en”:”In this American English pronunciation video, youu2019re going to come with me and my parents to Colorado. Youu2019ll get to see some of the natural beauty of this state, and study American English pronunciation in real life. Todayu2019s topics: How to pronounce u2018riveru2019, gorge, the noun and the verb, the idioms u2018to keep your eyes peeledu2019 and u2018keep an eye outu2019. Also, the pronunciation of u2018mooseu2019 and u2018elku2019. >> One neat feature of Colorado is the Colorado river. Now, it might not look like too much here, but this is the river that carved out the Grand Canyon in Arizona. I was lucky enough to visit the Grand Canyon on my Epic Road Trip Across America this summer. >> The word u2018riveru2019 is a two-syllable word with stress on the first syllable. DA-da. River. It begins with an R consonant.

When the R comes at the beginning of a word, the lips to make a tight circle for that, rr, and the tongue is pulled back. For me, the middle part is touching the roof of the mouth about here, rr, the tip isnu2019t touching anything. Then we have the IH vowel, so the jaw will drop just a bit and the tongue will come forward. Riv-. >> Then for the V, the bottom lip will come up and make contact with the bottom of the top front teeth. Riv-er. Then we have the schwa-R ending, so the tongue will come back into position for the R. The jaw doesnu2019t need to drop.

River, river. River. >> Weu2019ve stopped here to take a look at the Byeru2019s Gorge. A gorge is a deep, rocky ravine. And, as you can see, we have these nice, beautiful rock faces going up on either side. And I think itu2019s just beautiful. In this case, the Colorado river is whatu2019s flowing down, uh, in the middle. I suppose it is what has worn the edges of the mountains down. >> Gorge is sort of a tricky word. It starts with the G consonant, then it has the AW as in LAW, but the tongue must pull straight back for the R consonant, gor-, gor-, -ge.

And it ends with the J as in JAR consonant sound. Gorge. Itu2019s gorgeous! >> Well gorge also has the meaning of eating too much food, when you gorge out. >> Thatu2019s true. >> On a bunch of food. >> Thatu2019s true. So this is the noun gorge, and the verb gorge: stuffing your face, basically. >> Thatu2019s right. >> Yeah. >> And itu2019s sort of funny in that, in the one, gorge is hollowing out, cutting away >> Right.

>> u2026this big ravine >> Yeah. >> u2026 in the mountains, and on the other, gorge is filling up. >> Right. Stuffing! >> Way too much. >> Thatu2019s interesting. So, gorge the noun is a narrow valley, like you saw, typically with rock walls and a river or stream running through it. The verb has a completely different meaning, to eat a lot of food, to stuff yourself. The word comes from a word meaning throat. Next we drove to Rocky Mountain national park to see elk and moose. >> Okay, so keep your eyes peeled for both elk and moose. Keep your eyes peeled means to watch for something. We use it with u2018foru2019, which you know we like to reduce. Keep your eyes peeled for moose and elk. >> So keep your eyes peeled for both elk and moose. >> Dad, whatu2019s the other idiom we came up with for this? >> Uh, keep an eye out for elk and moose.

>> Yes. As we drive, weu2019ll keep an eye out for moose and elk. >> Keep an eye out for elk and moose. >> Yes. Keep an eye out is not the same thing as keep an eye on. >> No. Thatu2019s correct. >> If we had some elk here, we could keep an eye on them. But since we donu2019t have any and weu2019re looking for them, weu2019re keeping an eye out for them. Keep an eye on means to watch or pay attention to something. For example, keep an eye on the time so youu2019re not late. >> Elk has the EH as in BED vowel. A lot of jaw drop. Then the Dark L, so the back part of your tongue has to pull back, el-k. Then the K. So lift your tongue to the soft palate, and release. Elk. >> Itu2019s fun being able to get so close. Thereu2019s two here, which brings me to the point that the plural of elk is elk.

You donu2019t add an S or anything. One elk, two elk. We got lots of good views of elk. But I really wanted to see a moose. I only saw them at a distance, sitting down. We had been looking the whole day, and I was starting to think I wouldnu2019t see one. Then, just before it was dark outu2026 >> I feel very luck to be seeing my first moose. Moose is an easy pronunciation. Itu2019s the M consonant sound, the OO as in BOO vowel, and the S consonant sound. Plural, just like u2018elku2019, adds no s. Itu2019s still just moose. One moose, a herd of moose. Isnu2019t it beautiful? This is a female, so it doesnu2019t have the antlers. I hope you enjoyed this study of real life American English in the beautiful Rocky Mountain National Park.

Thatu2019s it, and thanks so much for using Rachelu2019s English.. “}

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Hypnotherapy in Brighton

Can these English teachers fool you?

{“en”:”Ready for an April Foolu2019s Day lesson? Wait. Does everyone watching know what April Foolu2019s Day is? I can sum it up in a single line: itu2019s a day when people play silly jokes on one another. Right. We try to fool friends and family. Itu2019s all done in fun. And when people discover that itu2019s a joke, the joker can say, u201cApril Foolu2019s!u201d So five of us teachers have come together to see if we can fool you. Weu2019re each going to ask a true-false question. Some of us will tell the truth. Others are going to try to fool you. Do I look like a person who can handle weapons? Actually, I know how to use three types of weapons. True or false? True. I briefly studied tae kwon do.

And thatu2019s when I learned how to use a long staff, a short stick, and nunchucks. Double and single. Did you hear how I stated my list? A long staff, a short stick, and nunchucks. A common pattern is to use rising intonation on all but the last item of a list, as in one, two, and three. We use falling intonation on the last item. For more information and practice, please check out my lesson on intonation patterns for stating lists and presenting alternatives. I’m from the United States of America but do you know which state I currently live in? Well, if you follow ‘go Natural English’ you probably know the answer.

I live in Missouri. True or false? The answer is false. I made one of the Go Natural videos in Missouri when I was visiting family. My father lives there. But I am not from there and I don’t currently live there. But you can see the video I made and learn about how to use words stress correctly to sound more like a natural English speaker. I went to graduate school to study Linguistics. True or false? False! I went to graduate school to study opera singing. Check out this video I made about intonation in American English and how it can help you sound more native. I have a short clip of me singing opera in that video! Iu2019m British and this is my husband, Jay.

Heu2019s American. Thatu2019s true! So he says tomahto and I say tomayto. Is that true or false? Itu2019s false! Itu2019s the other way round. I say tomayto and she says tomahto. So watch our video on British and American pronunciation differences to learn more. Check this out. I used to work at a fish market. True or false? True! Actually I worked at a fish market for six summers when I was a teenager. Did you notice the rhythm while I was speaking? Did you? When we speak, we stress the words that are most important for people to understand. Those words are on the beat in English. The other words – usually little grammar words – they shrink, they get smaller, or link together. That’s the shrinking and linking. If you’re interested in this topic – so important for practicing English, please check out this video I made.. “}

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Study English in London

English Conversation Study

In this American English pronunciation video, we’ll go for a hike in Colorado. My dad and I discussed the hike and we’ll talk about interesting pronunciations and vocabulary words that come up in real English conversation. This hike is called Chihuahua Gulch. Chihuahua. Have you heard this word before? It’s a teeny tiny breed of dog. The spelling is pretty strange in American English because this word comes to us from Spanish. The breed originated in Mexico. This hike is called Chihuahua Gulch and it’s about seven miles roundtrip. Roundtrip. The opposite of this phrase is one way. So when you go somewhere and come back, that’s roundtrip. Notice how the D is dropped. Roundtrip. We often drop the D when it comes between two other consonants. Roundtrip. Roundtrip. It’s about seven miles roundtrip and it goes up about 1,900 feet. So this hike ends at a lake? Yeah. You go… you start off going uphill about thirty minutes, then you go through this long valley. Notice how my dad really stretches out the word ‘long’. Why does he do that? When we want to really stress words, we make them longer, and you might do that especially with the word ‘long’ making it longer for dramatic purposes.

Long Valley. That took a long time. That test was so long. through this long valley with a lot of gorse and little lakes and— Gorse. Hmm…do you know that word? I didn’t either. Let’s find out what it means. With a lot of gorse and little lakes and little streams. Gorse. Gorse are these bushes. Oh! I didn’t…didn’t know that. And you sort of go to the end of the trees where the jeep road ends. Did you understand what he said there? He called this road ‘jeep road’. So a jeep is a really rugged vehicle that has a high clearance. That is a lot of room between the ground and the bottom of a car. You would not be able to drive a regular car on this road. Where the jeep road ends and then it’s just a single path. And you end up at a mountain lake.

And you said that mountain lake: “Eh, if you’ve seen one, you’ve seen them all.” You’ve seen one. You seen them all. This is a phrase you might use to say that something isn’t special. Now the full grammatically correct pronunciation of this phrase would be ‘If you’ve seen one, you’ve seen them all.’ but that’s not how we pronounce it. We like to reduce things in American English especially familiar words and phrases and this is a familiar known phrase.

You’ve seen one, you’ve seen them all. We dropped the word ‘if’, we reduce ‘you’ve’ to just ye– and we reduce ‘them’ to ‘um’. You seen. Seen um. You’ve seen one. You seen them all. Another scenario where you may use this: do you want to visit Paris? Nah, I’m not that into cities. You’ve seen one, you’ve seen them all. Eh, You’ve seen one, you’ve seen them all. A lot of them are pretty similar. A lot of them. My dad also reduced ‘them’ to ‘um’. This is a really common reduction just like in the phrase ‘you’ve seen one, you seen them all’. A lot of them. A lot of them. Practice that with me out loud, smoothly connecting all the words. A lot of them. A lot of them. A lot of them are pretty similar. But you do have a great view? You can see a long way out over the… a couple of different mountain ranges. A couple of different mountain ranges. My dad reduced the word ‘of’ to just the schwa. Uh. A couple of— We do this so much in conversation especially with this phrase: a couple of— A couple of different mountain ranges.

And the lake itself is probably— Probably— This is how we pronounce ‘probably’ most of the time in conversation. You can do it too. It simplifies the word and makes it easier to say. Try it now. Probably. Probably. Probably. Itself is probably hundred yards across and maybe 200 by 400. Does anyone ever swim there? I did see somebody swim in there once.

– Very cold. – Ice cold. Really cold. Listen to the different ways we describe how cold it is. – Very cold. – Ice cold. Really cold. Really cold. Ice cold. Very cold. ‘Really’ and ‘very’ are words we use before adjectives to say there’s a lot of something. Really cold. Very cold. A high amount of coldness. Ice cold is another great way to describe something being very cold. Now this lake is not ice, its water, it’s very cold water.

So describing it as ice cold is an exaggeration, a hyperbole. I know it’s not actually ice. I know it’s just extremely cold water. – Very cold. – Ice cold. Really cold. I had no temptation to do that. Yeah, I don’t think I will either. This is just… you can’t design a better day. There’s not much wind, hardly any clouds, cool but not cold, and this time of year, you have a lot of aspens turning yellow. This time of year. Another example of reducing the word ‘of’ to just the schwa in natural conversation. This time of year. This time of year, you have a lot of aspens turning yellow and these bushes, I mean, they would be green and in the summer. Yeah it looks awesome. I mean, I love, I love the view. Yeah. Sweeping views. And we have seen wildlife along here. Yeah, just a couple hundred yards down. Once, there were four moose. Moose. These animals are fairly rare to see in the wild. One other time when I was in Colorado, we saw one. Click here or in the video description to see that video.

There were four moose grazing right by the path. Further down yet, we saw heard of maybe 10 or 15 antelope. – Wow. – Galloping along. You often see deer. You often see. My dad reduced ‘you’ to ye, changing the vowel to the schwa. This is also a common reduction. Why do we do this? Because in American English, the contrast between stressed and unstressed syllables is really important. So if we can make unstressed syllables even shorter by changing something, then we do that. You often see. You often see deer up here and then on the rocks, you can see marmots sometime and pike which are little tiny animals like and they squeak. How many times have you done this hike? Probably five or six. Probably. There’s another probably to probably reduction. Probably five or six. And to me, it’s the most scenic hike around here especially in September. Scenic. This is a great word you can use to describe a beautiful landscape.

Scenic. Scenic. To me it’s the most scenic hike around here especially in September because the aspen are turning yellow and a lot of these bushes are turning red and in June, July, it’s just the waters too high you’d have to take off your shoes and put on sandals and just wade through. So usually, we wait till August or September to do this one. Wade. This is what you do when you’re walking through water. So you’re not swimming. You’re walking like through a creek. If the water is too deep, then you can’t wade. You have to swim. Take off your shoes and put on sandals and just wade through. Here is David walking over the creek that dad says you have to wade through when the water is higher. We didn’t make it to the top.

Yeah but we got to a good turning around point and we had a fantastic view, we had lunch looking out down the long valley. Couldn’t have been better. Couldn’t have been better. A word here is being reduced to just the schwa. What word is it? We noticed before that the word ‘of’ reduces to just the schwa. But here it’s the word ‘have’. Yes, the word ‘have’ can be changed to just the schwa sound: uh in conversation especially after could, couldn’t, should, shouldn’t, would, wouldn’t.

I’ve actually seen native speakers mess this up and write ‘should of’ instead of ‘should have’. It makes sense because ‘of’ and ‘have’ can both produce the same single sound, the schwa. Shoulda. But if this sound is following could, couldn’t, should, shouldn’t, would, wouldn’t, the word is definitely ‘have’ and reducing ‘have’ to just the schwa after these words will help your English sound natural. Practice. Couldn’t have. Couldn’t have. Notice I’m dropping the T in the contraction. This is how native speakers will say this phrase. Couldn’t have. Couldn’t have. Special thanks to my dad for being in yet another Rachel’s English video. To see more videos that use real English conversation for teaching, check out my Real English playlist..

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English Phone Conversation: How to Start and End

You asked for it. So in this American English pronunciation video, we’re going to do a Ben Franklin Exercise where we take real American English conversation and analyze the American accent to improve listening comprehension and pronunciation skills. First, let’s listen to the whole conversation. I’m going to call my mom. No idea if she’s home. Let’s see, it’s her time. We’ll see if she picks up. She’s not answering. Hey mom! What’s up? – Not much. How are you? – Pretty good. – What are you doing? – Roberta and Ernie are here.

Oh, that’s right! Now, for the analysis. What would you say about the stress of those first two words? Hey mom! Hey mom! To me, those sound like they’re both stressed. Hey– mom! Hey mom! Hey mom! They both have huh— huh— a little bit of that up down stress in the voice. Hey mom! It’s hard to hear my mom’s response because it’s through the phone. What’s up? What’s up? What’s up? With the intonation going up. What’s up? Very smooth and connected. The TS connected to the UH vowel. What’s up? Not much. How are you? Not much. How are you? I made a Stop T at the end of ‘not’. We do this when the next word begins with a consonant. Not much. How are you? How did I pronounce the word ‘are’? Not much.

How are you? I reduced it to the schwa R sound. Howwer– howwer– and connected it to the word before. Howwer– howwer– Not much.How are you? How are you? How are you? With the pitch going down. Not much. How are you? Pretty good! Pretty good! How are those Ts pronounced? Pretty good! Pretty good! Like a Flap T or D. Pretty. Pretty. Pretty good! These phrases are typical of starting a phone conversation. You ask a person how they are. How are you? And they ask you how you are. What’s up? Generally, you give little generic responses. Not much, pretty good. This is small talk. Hey mom! What’s up! Not much. How are you? Pretty good! What are you doing? Roberta and Ernie are here. Oh, that’s right. Again, the word ‘are’. What are you doing? I reduced it to the schwa R sound whatterr– whatter— So the T became a Flap T between vowels. What are you doing? Whatter– it sounds like one word, water.

Water. What are you doing? I dropped the G to make just an N sound instead of an NG sound. What are you doing? What are you doing? Roberta and Ernie are here. The word ‘and’ was reduced to nn– Roberta and Ernie are here. Nn– Roberta and Ernie Roberta and Ernie are here. Again, R reduced to the schwa R sound Ernie -err– Ernie -err– Roberta and Ernie are here. Oh, that’s right. How is the T pronounced in ‘right’? Oh, that’s right! –that’s right! It was a Stop T. So we make a Stop T, unreleased, when the next sound is a consonant or at the end of a sentence or thought. Oh, that’s right. That’s right. Alright, well have a good dinner tonight.

Okay, we’ll have fun. And now, phrases we use in getting off the phone as you wrap up a conversation. Alright, well, have a good dinner tonight. Okay, we’ll have fun. It’s common for people to ‘have fun’ or ‘have a good time’ with what they’re doing next. Here, I’m commenting on their plans for dinner tonight. Alright, well, have a good dinner tonight. In order to make this first word very quickly, I dropped the L and make a Stop T.

Alright, well, have a good dinner tonight. Arright– arright– arright– I also don’t put these commas in, do I? Alright, well, have a good dinner tonight. I go straight to them without a pause. The first syllable of ‘dinner’ is stressed. Have a good dinner tonight. Have a good dinner tonight. Have a good dinner tonight. And it’s the clearest syllable in that phrase. Notice ‘tonight’ is pronounced with the schwa. We want to do this all the time. Tonight, tomorrow, in both of those words, the letter O makes the schwa sound. Tonight. How is the T pronounced? Have a good dinner tonight. Tonight– Another Stop T at the end of a sentence. Here again we’re entering small talk to get off the phone. I tell my mom to have a good time. She responds ‘okay, we’ll have fun.’ Alright, well, have a good dinner tonight.

Okay. We’ll have fun. The intonation of ‘okay’ goes up. It shows that she’s not done talking yet. She’s gonna saw one more thing. Okay. We’ll have fun. The word ‘fun’ then goes down in pitch. So I know it’s the end of her thought. Okay. We’ll have fun. Alright, well, talk to you guys soon. Enjoy New York. I will, thank you! My next phrase again starts with ‘alright, well’ Alright, well, talk to you guys soon. And again, to make that first word very fast, I drop the L and make a Stop T. Alright well– alright well– Alright, well, talk to you guys soon! Talk to you guys soon. Talk and soon, both stressed, both have the up-down shape. Talk to you guys soon.Talk to you guys soon. Talk to you guys soon. The less important words like ‘too’ are very fast. I reduced the vowel into the schwa. Te– te– talkte– talkte– talk to you guys soon. More small talk. Now, my mom is wishing me well and telling me to enjoy what I’m doing.

Alright, well, talk to you guys soon. Enjoy New York. Enjoy, have fun, these are the kinds of phrases we say when ending a phone conversation. Enjoy New York. I will, thank you! Bye. Alright, bye! And I just respond generically with a confirmation ‘I will.’ I will, thank you. I will, thank you. I will, thank you. Bye. My mom actually says b-bye, doesn’t she? She makes the B sound twice. B-bye! This is short for ‘bye’. Bye. Just another way to say ‘bye’. -Bye! -Alright, bye! I must really like the word ‘alright’ at the end of the conversation because I say it one more time. Again, dropping the L and making a Stop T. Bye. Alright, bye. Bye. With the up-down shape of the voice. I will, thank you. Bye. Alright, bye. So in starting a phone conversation, we use small talk asking someone how they’re doing and responding. Hey mom! What’s up? Not much, how are you? Pretty good.

And in getting off the phone, we use small talk often telling someone to have fun with what they’re about to do and saying bye. I will, thank you. – Bye. – Alright, bye. Let’s listen again following along with our marked up text. You’ll hear two different speeds. Regular pace and slowed down. Hey mom. What’s up? Not much. How are you? Pretty good. What are you doing? Roberta and Ernie are here. Oh, that’s right. Alright, well, have a good dinner tonight. Okay. We’ll have fun. Alright, well, talk to you guys soon. Enjoy New York. I will. Thank you. Bye. Alright, bye. Hey mom. What’s up? Not much. How are you? Pretty good. What are you doing? Roberta and Ernie are here.

Oh, that’s right. Alright, well, have a good dinner tonight. Okay. We’ll have fun. Alright, well, talk to you guys soon. Enjoy New York. I will. Thank you. -Bye. -Alright, bye. We’ll listen one last time. This time, you’ll repeat. You’ll hear each sentence or sentence fragment three times. Repeat exactly as you hear it. Paying attention to intonation, sounds, and stress. Hey mom! What’s up? Not much. How are you? Pretty good. What are you doing? Roberta and Ernie are here. Oh, that’s right. Alright, well, have a good dinner tonight. Okay. We’ll have fun. Alright, well, talk to you guys soon. Enjoy New York. I will. Thank you. Bye. Alright, bye. Now, the conversation one more time. Hey mom! What’s up? Not much. How are you? Pretty good. What are you doing? Roberta and Ernie are here. Oh, that’s right. Alright, well, have a good dinner tonight. Okay. We’ll have fun Alright, well, talk to you guys soon. Enjoy New York. I will. Thank you. – Bye. – Alright, bye. Great job. If you liked this video, be sure to sign up for my mailing list for a free weekly newsletter with pronunciation videos sent straight to your inbox.

Also I am happy to tell you my book, American English Pronunciation, is available for purchase. If you want an organized step-by-step resource to build your American accent, click here to get the book or see the description below. I think you’re going to love it. That’s it and thanks so much for using Rachel’s English..

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English Conversation Study: Introducing Tom and HaQuyen – American English

You asked for it. So in this American English pronunciation video, we’re going to do a Ben Franklin exercise where we take real American English conversation and analyze the American accent to improve listening comprehension and pronunciation skills. First, let’s listen to the whole conversation. R: HaQuyen, this is Tom. HQ: Hi. T: Hi. HQ: Nice to meet you. T: How are you? T: Nice to meet you, too. R: Have you guys met before? HQ: Um… T: I don’t think so. HQ: No, not, not in person.

But you’ve told me about him. R: Okay. It seems like you have because I’ve known both of you for so long, but … T: Yeah. R: Never overlapped. T: Yeah, well, it’s about time! Now for the analysis. R: HaQuyen, this is Tom. Did you notice how the second syllable of ‘HaQuyen’ and the syllable ‘Tom’ were the most stressed? They had that up-down shape.

Especially ‘Tom’, which came down in pitch at the end of the sentence. R: HaQuyen, this is Tom. We want this shape in our stressed syllables. The two words ‘this is’ were flatter and quicker. R: HaQuyen, this is Tom. [2x] HQ: Hi. T: Hi: Both words, ‘hi’, ‘hi’, ‘hi’, had that up-down shape. Hi. Hi. HQ: Hi. T: Hi. [3x] HQ: Nice to meet you. These two phrases happened at the same time. HaQuyen said, “Nice to meet you.” What’s the most stressed word there? HQ: Nice to meet you. [2x] ‘Meet’. ‘Nice’ also had some stress, a little longer.

Nice to meet you. The word ‘to’ was reduced. Rather than the OO vowel, we have the schwa. Nice to, to, to. HQ: Nice to meet you. [2x] Nice to meet you. What did you notice about the pronunciation of this T? HQ: Nice to meet you. [2x] It was a Stop T. Meet you. There was no release of the T sound. HQ: Nice to meet you. [2x] Tom’s phrase, “How are you?” How are you? T: How are you? [2x] He stressed the word ‘are’. How are you? T: How are you? [2x] You’ll also hear this with the word ‘you’ stressed. How are you? T: How are you? Nice to meet you, too. Tom really stressed the word ‘too’. T: Nice to meet you, too. [2x] It was the loudest and clearest of the sentence. T: Nice to meet you, too. [2x] He, like HaQuyen, also reduced the word ‘to’ to the schwa. To, nice to, nice to meet you. T: Nice to meet you, too.

[2x] Also, again like HaQuyen, he made a Stop T here. He did not release the T sound. Meet you. T: Nice to meet you, too. [2x] R: Have you guys met before? I put a little break here, between ‘guys’ and ‘met’, while I thought about what I was going to say. R: Have you guys met before? Did you notice my pronunciation of T? A Stop T. R: Met before? We tend to make T’s Stop T’s when the next word begins with a consonant. Or, when the word is at the end of a thought or sentence.

R: Met before? [2x] R: Have you guys met before? What do you notice about the intonation of the sentence? How does it end? R: Have you guys met before? Before? It goes up in pitch. R: Have you guys met before? That’s because this is a yes/no question. A question that can be answered with yes or no goes up in pitch at the end. Other questions, and statements, go down in pitch. T: I don’t think so. I don’t think so, I don’t think so. Again, there was a clear stop in sound here. I don’t think so. T: I don’t thinks so. [2x] I don’t think so. The words were not connected. I don’t, I don’t, I don’t think. I don’t think so. ‘Think’ was the most stressed word there.

I don’t think so. Feel your energy to towards it and then away from it in the sentence. I don’t think so. T: I don’t think so. HQ: No, not, not in person. The first ‘not’ was a Stop T, as HaQuyen did not continue. Not, not. Not in person. The second T, though, was a Flap T because it links two vowels together. The AH vowel, and the IH as in SIT vowel. Most Americans will make the T between vowels a Flap T, which sounds like a D between vowels. Not in [3x]. Not in person. HQ: Not in person. [2x] ‘Person’ is a two-syllable word. Which syllable is stressed? HQ: Not in person [2x]. The first syllable. PER-son. The second syllable doesn’t really have a vowel in it. It’s the schwa sound. But when the schwa is followed by N, you don’t need to try to make a separate vowel, -son, -son, person, person. HQ: Not in person [2x], but you’ve told me about him. How is the T pronounced in ‘but’? HQ: But you’ve told me about him.

[2x] It’s a Stop T, but you’ve, but you’ve. What’s the most stressed, the most clear word in this phrase? HQ: But you’ve told me about him. [2x] It’s the verb ‘told’. But you’ve told me about him. The sentence peaks with that word. HQ: But you’ve told me about him. [2x] HaQuyen dropped the H in ‘him’. We do this often with the words ‘him’, ‘he’, ‘his’, ‘her’, for example. Also, ‘have’ and ‘had’. HQ: But you’ve told me about him.

[2x] Now the T comes between two vowels. What’s that going to be? A Flap T. About him, about him. Just flap the tongue on the roof of the mouth. HQ: But you’ve told me about him. [2x] R: Okay. I didn’t really pronounce the OH diphthong here, it was more like a schwa, okay, okay. ‘-Kay’ had the shape of a stressed syllable. Okay. R: Okay. [2x] It seems like you have… In the first part of this sentence, what is the most clear, the most stressed syllable? R: It seems like you have [2x] It’s the word ‘seems’. It seems like you have [2x]. R: It seems like you have [2x] because I’ve known both of you for so long, but. What about in the second half of the sentence. What’s the most stressed syllable? R: because I’ve known both of you for so long, but.

[2x] Known. Because I’ve known both of you for so long. ‘Long’ is also stressed, it’s also a longer word. R: because I’ve known both of you for so long, but. [2x] Even though this sentence is very fast, it still has longer stressed words, ‘seems’, ‘known’, ‘long’. It’s important to keep your stressed words longer, even when you’re speaking quickly. This is what’s clear to Americans. R: because I’ve known both of you for so long, but. [2x] The less important words, the function words, will be less clear and very fast. And sometimes, we’ll change the sounds. For example, in the word ‘for’. That was pronounced with the schwa, for, for, for.

It’s very fast. R: For so long [2x], but. How did I pronounce the T in ‘but’? R: For so long, but. [2x] It was the end of my thought, it was a Stop T. But, but. I stopped the air. R: For so long, but. [2x] T: Yeah. Tom’s interjection, ‘yeah’: stressed. Up-down shape. Yeah, yeah, yeah. T: Yeah. [2x] R: Never overlapped. Can you tell which is the stressed syllable in ‘never’? Which is longer? R: Never overlapped.

[2x] It’s the first syllable. Ne-ver. What about in the next word? R: Never overlapped. [2x] Again, it’s the first syllable. O-verlapped. Never overlapped. Uh-uh. Never overlapped. R: Never overlapped. [2x] Notice the –ed ending here is pronounced as a T, an unvoiced sound. That’s because the sound before, P, was also unvoiced. Overlapped, overlapped. R: Never overlapped. [2x] T: Yeah, well, it’s about time. Did you notice that Tom didn’t really make a vowel here. Tsabout, tsabout. He connected the TS sound into the next sound. T: Well, it’s about time. [2x] How is this T pronounced? T: Well, it’s about time. [2x] A Stop T, because the next sound is a consonant. T: Well, it’s about time. Let’s listen again, following along with our marked up text. You’ll hear two different speeds, regular pace, and slowed down. R: HaQuyen, this is Tom. HQ: Hi. T: Hi. HQ: Nice to meet you. T: How are you? T: Nice to meet you, too. R: Have you guys met before? HQ: Um… T: I don’t think so. HQ: No, not, not in person. But you’ve told me about him.

R: Okay. It seems like you have because I’ve known both of you for so long, but … T: Yeah. R: Never overlapped. T: Yeah, well, it’s about time! R: HaQuyen, this is Tom. HQ: Hi. T: Hi. HQ: Nice to meet you. T: How are you? T: Nice to meet you, too. R: Have you guys met before? HQ: Um… T: I don’t think so. HQ: No, not, not in person. But you’ve told me about him. R: Okay. It seems like you have because I’ve known both of you for so long, but … T: Yeah. R: Never overlapped. T: Yeah, well, it’s about time! We’ll listen one last time. This time, you’ll repeat.

You’ll hear each sentence or sentence fragment three times. Repeat exactly as you hear it, paying attention to intonation, sounds, and stress. R: HaQuyen, this is Tom. [3x] HQ: Hi. T: Hi. [3x] HQ: Nice to meet you. T: How are you? [3x] T: Nice to meet you, too. [3x] R: Have you guys met before? [3x] HQ: Um… T: I don’t think so. [3x] HQ: No, not, not in person.

[3x] But you’ve told me about him. [3x] R: Okay. [3x] It seems like you have [3x] because I’ve known both of you [3x] for so long, but … [3x] T: Yeah. [3x] R: Never overlapped. [3x] T: Yeah, well, it’s about time! [3x] Now the conversation, one more time. R: HaQuyen, this is Tom. HQ: Hi. T: Hi.

HQ: Nice to meet you. T: How are you? T: Nice to meet you, too. R: Have you guys met before? HQ: Um… T: I don’t think so. HQ: No, not, not in person. But you’ve told me about him. R: Okay. It seems like you have because I’ve known both of you for so long, but … T: Yeah. R: Never overlapped. T: Yeah, well, it’s about time! Great job. If you liked this video, be sure to sign up for my mailing list for a free weekly newsletter with pronunciation videos sent straight to your inbox.

Also, I’m happy to tell you my book American English Pronunciation is available for purchase. If you want an organized, step-by-step resource to build your American accent, click here to get the book, or see the description below. I think you’re going to love it. That’s it, and thanks so much for using Rachel’s English..

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Say what you mean! Simple English words that learners often say incorrectly

Hi there. My name is Emma, and in today’s video I am going to teach you how to improve your pronunciation by looking at pronunciation problems. A lot of students confuse words; or sometimes two words, they sound similar, and students confuse the pronunciation of those words. Okay? So in this video we’re going to look at five different sets of words, and I’m going to explain how to pronounce them, and: What are the differences in their pronunciation? So let’s get started. The first word that I want to practice is the difference between “word” and “world”. Okay? I know a lot of students have a lot of difficulty, especially with “world” because you have the “r” and the “l”, which is really challenging for a lot of students. So let’s learn how to pronounce these two different words. With “word”, I’ve written here the International Phonetic Alphabet spelling.

If you know this, great; if you don’t, don’t worry about it. This is just, if you do know this, this is how the word is in the IPA alphabet, the International Phonetic Alphabet. So if you want to pronounce this word, the first thing I want you to do is make an “er” sound. Can you do that? “Er”. “Er”, kind of like: “her”, “er”. Okay? Now what I want you to do is say the word: “were”, “were”, “they were”, okay? Now, if we add a “d” here: “werd”, “werd”. Okay? Can you say that? “Werd”. One thing that can help you sometimes is with rhymes.

If you know something that rhymes with the word it can also help you with the pronunciation. So this is the past tense of “hear”: “I heard”. Can you say the word: “heard”? “Heard”. “I heard the word”. So you see these have the same sound: “word”, “heard”. So the very basic part of this is if you can make the “er” sound, that’s the very basic part of it: “er”, “word”. This is also a kind of short sound: “word”. Now, I want you to compare that to this sound: “world”. Okay? This sound is a little bit longer for this word. “World”. So I have it here in the IPA or the International Phonetic Alphabet. Now, again, these two have the same vowel sound: “er”, so I want you to start with the pronunciation of this word by making this sound: “er”, “er”. Okay? Now, again, I want you to make the sound: “were”, “were”, “they were”. Okay, now here’s where it might get a bit tricky for some of you because of the “l”, I want you to add an “l” to this sound.

“Werl”, “werl”. Okay? And at the very end, your tongue when you make the “l” should be touching the roof of your mouth: “werl”. Okay. Now we’re going to add the “d”: “werld”, “werld”. Okay? So now let’s compare these two. I want you to say after me: “word”, “world”, “word”, “world”. Do you hear the difference? Okay. So this is something you can practice. Again, start with the “er” sound, that will really help you in the pronunciation of this. Now let’s look at some other words that are commonly confused.

Okay, so the next sounds or words that are very commonly confused in their pronunciation are the words: “walk” and “work”. Okay? Many students pronounce these as the same, but they’re quite different. So let’s look at “walk” first. Okay? So, again, I’ve written the International Phonetic Alphabet, if you know it; and if you don’t know it, that’s totally fine, you don’t need to know it for this lesson. This is just if you know it. So, one of the main mistakes people make with the word “walk” is with the “l”. Okay? Some students, they try to pronounce the “l” and they’ll say: “wallk”. The “l” is silent; we do not say the “l” at all. Okay? So, imagine this is the word “walk”… Well, it is the word “walk”. I’m just going to remove that.

So, it looks more like: “w-a-k”, “wak”. Okay, so the first sound I want to practice is the vowel sound because this is where a lot of students have problems, is with the vowel sound. It’s an “aw” sound, okay? So, I want you to remember when you last went to your doctor. Okay? So imagine you’re at the doctor’s and they want to look inside your mouth, you have to make a sound, you say: “Aw”. Right? When you go to the doctor’s you say: “Aw”.

I want you to make that sound: “Aw”, “aw”. Okay? Notice my mouth is very open for this sound. It’s not closed. It’s: “aw”. Okay, so you need to make that sound to make this word. Now I want you to say: “wa”, “wa”. All right? It’s not a relaxed sound. Your mouth is very… It feels like you’re doing work with it: “wa”, “wa”. Okay? Now I want you to add the “k”: “wak”, “wak”. All right. Now, again, your mouth for this… This is my mouth, these are my lips, it’s very open, but it’s not wide, it’s narrow: “walk”. Okay? Again, if you have trouble with these words, it’s sometimes a good idea to practice in front of a mirror. Okay? So, see what your mouth is doing in front of a mirror, that can help you. Now, I want you to compare this with the vowel sound in: “work”.

Okay? Does my mouth open up a lot? “Work”, “walk”. No. There’s a big difference in what my mouth is doing. So, with “work” we need, again, to make this “er” sound: “her”, “er”. Okay? So I want you to make that sound: “er”. Now I want you to say the word: “were”, “were”. So similar to what we just did with “world” and “word”: “were”. Okay. Now I want you to add a “k” to this: “werk”, “werk”. Okay? “Work”. Now let’s try to compare the two sounds. Can you say this one? “Walk”, “walk”, “work”, “work”. Okay, so again, main difference is in what your mouth is doing. In this your mouth is very open, and in this one it’s not really that open.

All right, so now let’s look at some other words that are commonly mispronounced or confused in their pronunciation. Okay, so the next two words that many students make mistakes when they’re pronouncing is: “bird” and “beard”. Okay? So a “beard” is on a man when they have this… Like, hair coming down from their chin. This is a beard. Okay? Whereas a “bird”, you know, there’s different types of birds, they’re a type of animal. So I’ve noticed many students want to say: “bird”, but they say “beard” instead. Okay? So let’s look at the difference in these pronunciations. So let’s start with “bird”. Okay, so to start with this sound I want you to make an “er” sound. Again you’ll notice a lot of these words have the same “er” sound. “Er”. “Ber”, “ber”, “berd”, “berd”. Now, I want you to really look at my mouth. Am I smiling when I say this word? “Bird”.

No, I’m not smiling. Okay? So you do not smile when you say the word “bird”. You have a very small mouth, in fact: “bird”. And it’s kind of serious looking: “er”, “bird”. The sound is also very short. We’re not saying: “biird”, no, no, no. It’s short: “bird”. Now compare this to: “beard”. Okay? In this word we do smile, and that’s one of the big differences. You do not smile with the word “bird”, but you smile with the word “beard”. Okay? So, to start with I want you to make an “e” sound: “ee”.

This is usually the sound we make when we’re having our picture taken. Sometimes we say: “Cheese”, “ee”. Okay? “Ee”, now I want you to say: “bee”, “bee”. “Beer”, “beer”. “Beerd”, “beerd”. Okay? And you’ll also notice this sound is a lot longer than this sound. “Bird”, “beard”. Okay? This sound kind of makes your mouth feel a little bit tired after because it’s very tense. Your mouth is not relaxed. “Beard”. Okay? So I’m really using my muscles, whereas for this sound: “ber”, no, your mouth is very small, you’re not really using so many muscles.

Okay? So, this is something a lot of students should really practice, especially if you have trouble with your… This sound: “er”, with “ee”. Okay? So now let’s look at some other words to pronounce. Okay, so our next word is: “man” and “men”. Many students confuse these two things. “Man” is one person, “men” there’s more than one; you can have two men, three men, four men. So, they mean the same thing, but the difference is this means multiple people… Okay? So I’ll show multiple men, versus one. Okay, so now let’s look at the pronunciation of these two words. “Man”. To start with I want you to practice the name: “Anne”. Okay? And notice my mouth, it’s big: “Anne”. It’s almost like I’m eating a hamburger or something. “Anne”. Okay? My mouth is very wide and also very tall: “Anne”. Now what I want you to do now is just add an “M” to the name “Anne”: “Manne”. Okay? “Manne”. And, again, it’s great to practice this in front of a mirror.

“Manne”. Now, I want you to compare this sound to: “men”. Is my mouth really big for this one? “Men”. “Man”, “men”, no, there’s a big difference. For “man” I have a very big mouth, for “men” my mouth is quite small. So, to start with the pronunciation of this sound, I want you to say the letter “n”, “n”. What letter is this? This is an “n”. “N”. Now, I want you to add an “m”, so this becomes “men”. “N”, “men”. “Men”. If you have a lot of trouble with this and you can never remember: “Oh, which one do I have the big mouth for, which one do I have the little mouth for? I’m so confused.” If you can say this word, the number “ten”, you can say this: “men”. You can remember: There are ten men. Okay? And that makes sense, because “men” is plural. Ten men. They rhyme, so that can help. So again, this one is a smaller mouth.

So let’s quickly say the two words and just, you know, practice the pronunciation. “Man”, “men”. Okay? So now let’s look at our last pronunciation problem. Okay, so our last words are: “woman” and “women”. A lot of students make mistakes with these two words. A lot of students will actually say: “Whoa man”, which is not correct. So, a lot of students they don’t even know they’re making this mistake, but it is a very common mistake students make. So let’s learn: What are the correct pronunciations of these words? So let’s get started with “woman”. So I’ve drawn here a woman and I’ve drawn here women so you can remember this is for one person, and this is for multiple people. Okay? So, I have, again, the IPA written. So I guess to begin let’s talk about this “o” sound. A lot of students think that when they pronounce this they should make an “o” with their mouth: “o”.

You do not make this sound with this word. You do not say: “whoa”. Okay? What you actually do is it’s a kind of smaller sound. I want you to think of the word “book”, “uh”, “book”. Or: “cook”. Now, notice my mouth. It’s not as big as “o”. Mm-mm. “Uh”, “book”, “cook”. If you’re a Star Wars fan, you can also remember the sound if you think about the character Wookie, Wook, Wookie. Okay? So same sound that’s in “woman”. Okay, so I want you to say: “uh”, “book”, “uh”. “Wuh”, “wuh”. Okay. Now, if we look at the word “min”, like “minute”, that’s for… We don’t say “man”. It’s more a softer sound, like “in”, “min”. “Wuh min”, “wuhmin”. Okay? So I want you to repeat after me: “wuhmin”. And again, make sure you’re not making an “o”.

You should not make an “o”. “Woman”. Now, I want you to compare this with: “women”. Okay? So there’s a difference here. For this sound I want you to start with the word “in”, “in”. “Im”, “im”. Okay? Now you can say: “wim”, “wim”. Okay? And notice my lips, they’re not rounded. Okay? They’re kind of: “im”, so they kind of look like… Not the greatest artist, but this is my mouth. Actually it’s smaller than this: “im”, “im”, “wim”. Okay? You can also think of the word “win”. “I win”, “wim”, very similar sounds. So now I want you to say: “wim”, “wim in”, “wimin”. Okay? All right, so now let’s compare these two sounds. “Women”, “women”, “woman”, “woman”. Okay? Now, if you’re not getting this right away, that’s okay. Number one thing: Try not to say: “Whoa man” because that sounds really strange.

So: “woman”, they’re softer pronunciations, and “women”. This is really good to practice in front of a mirror and to actually watch what your mouth is doing to make sure you’re not… You know, you don’t have a giant… Like, a very widely-opened mouth. It’s good to check in a mirror to make sure you’re doing the pronunciation correctly. I also recommend visiting our website at www.engvid.com. There, you can actually take a quiz to practice the different pronunciations we’ve learned today, so I highly recommend you visiting our website and taking that quiz. Until next time, take care..

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How did you first study English? YOUR VIDEOS!

Let’s enjoy this English language learning community. Sit back, relax, and watch all of the videos that you guys made about learning English. Two weeks ago, I asked you all to make a video in English talking about how you first started studying English. Wow! You guys are so wonderful. So dedicated. Everyone went from not knowing a thing about English to being able to make a video in English talking about learning English. It is so fun learning more about you, your language journeys, and your lives. You all really impress me. How and where did people in this community first study English? Let’s find out! But first, quickly, if you didn’t know about this challenge and you want to participate in the next one, be sure to sign up for my mailing list. You’ll get an email every week with the latest news on what’s happening in this English language learning community. It’s free. RachelsEnglish.com/newsletter. Now, your videos!.

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Video challenge! How did you study English?

Hey everyone! It’s time for another English video challenge! How brave are you feeling? I miss you guys! I haven’t heard from you since March. I think I’m going to start doing four challenges a year. So I get to see you and know more of you. It’s time for all of you wonderful, amazing, awesome English speakers to make me a short video in English. This time, the topic is how and where did you first study English? Did a parent teach you? Did you learn in school? Did you study on your own from books or a podcast? Make a video of yourself, just a couple of sentences, and let me know! Practice your English, then I’ll take all your videos and put them into one big video here on my channel. Those videos are so fun because we all get to see and learn so much about others in this Rachel’s English community. You are not out there alone. If this is your first time thinking about it and you want some inspiration, you can see all of these other challenge videos that people have made in the past.

They’re really good! And when you’re done getting your inspiration and you think ‘yes I want to do this’, this is what to do. Step one, record a video. Keep it on a short side. There’ll be an order from shortest to longest in my video. Please don’t add any music to it that might be a copyright issue. Or also don’t add any video that’s not yours. Step 2, post to YouTube. It’s okay if you make it unlisted but make sure it’s not private. Step 3, email it to me at this address by June 23rd 2017. If it comes in after that, it probably won’t go in my video. And that’s it! How and where did you first study English? Easy! Thanks in advance to everyone who makes a video like this.

It brightens my day! That’s it and thanks so much for using Rachel’s English!.

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