Learn English: The 2 ways to pronounce ‘THE’

{“en”:”Hello. I’m Gill from engVid, and today’s lesson is about the little word “the”, and how to say it, how to pronounce it. You might think: “What? I know how to pronounce that word”, but there are two different ways of pronouncing it, and this lesson is designed to show you how to work out which way to say it. Okay. So, the simple rule is: Before a consonant you say “thuh”, but before a vowel sound you say “thee”. So it’s either “thuh” or “thee”.

So, let me just go through some examples to show you how that works. So, before a consonant sound: “thuh”. “The banana”, “the dog”, but then we get our first exception, which is confusing because this word begins with an E which is a vowel letter, but the way it’s pronounced, it has a “ya” at the beginning: “Ya. European. European”, so we say: “Thuh European”, okay? So that’s a slight confusion to be aware of. Continuing on: “The flowers”, “the house”, “the man”, “the people”.

Another exception again because this word begins with a U, which is a vowel letter, but the actual sound when you say this sound is a “ya”, “university”, “university”. It’s not: “university”, it’s “university”. So: “thUH university”, okay? And finally: “The woman, the woman”. So that’s “the” before a consonant sound. So, let’s have a look at the other column. Before the vowel sound we say “thee”, so: “The apple”, “the elephant”, “the ice cream”, “the orange”, “the umbrella”. You can see here “umbrella” also begins with a U, just like “university”, but it’s not pronounced: “yumbrella”, it’s pronounced: “umbrella”, so: “thee umbrella, the umbrella”. Okay. And finally, here’s another funny one, it begins with an H, so you might think: “Well, that’s a consonant”, but it is actually a vowel sound because we don’t pronounce the H in this word.

You may know the word “heir”, which we had in another lesson about using “a” and “an”. The heir is usually, well, male, and the heiress, female; but often the word “heir” is used for female as well nowadays for reasons of equality. So, but: “the heiress”, “e”, so it’s an “e”, “heiress”, so that’s a vowel sound, so: “the heiress”. Okay? So that’s another one to remember, along with the “ya” sound here. So, it’s purely the way you say it which decides whether it’s “thuh” or “thee”. Okay? So now we’ll move on to a second screen, and we’ll do some sentences for you to work out how to pronounce each time the word “the” or “the” appears, so… Okay, so what I should have said at the end of the last section was the word “heir” and “heiress”, I didn’t explain what they meant. So, if you hadn’t seen the other lesson you wouldn’t… You might not know that, so “an heir” or “an heiress” is someone who inherits something, often money or property, something like that. So, okay. Right, so here is the test for you of how to pronounce the word “t-h-e”: “thuh” or “thee”, and as you can see, we have some sentences here.

And every time the word appears I’ve underlined it in red just to help you to see it. So, first sentence: “The ferry crossed the Irish Sea.” So, how would you pronounce the word there? Okay. So: “thuh” goes before a consonant sound, so “f” is a consonant, so: “Thuh fairy. The fairy crossed”, and what about this one? “I” is a vowel sound, so it’s “thee Irish Sea, the Irish Sea”. So: “The fairy crossed the Irish Sea.” Okay? Next one: “The right way is the only way.” Okay, so how would you pronounce those two? So, “r” is a consonant, so: “Thuh right way. The right way is”, “only”, that begins with an “o”, which is a vowel, “only”.

So: “thee only way. The right way is the only way.” Okay? Next one, we have three examples in this sentence, so: “The answer is at the back of the book.” So, what would you do there? “The answer, the back, the book”, so “answer” begins with “a”, which is a vowel, so it’s: “Thee answer. The answer is at”. “Back” and “book” begin with “b”, which is a consonant, so: “Thuh back of thuh book.” Okay. Next one: “The fire hasn’t reached the upper floor”. “Upper” means at the top of the building, up at the top. Okay, so: “fire” begins with an “f”, so that’s a consonant, so: “thuh fire. The fire hasn’t reached”, “upper” begins with “u” which is a vowel sound, so it’s: “thee upper floor. The fire hasn’t reached the upper floor.” Okay. Right. Next one: “The girl felt at home in the empty house.” So if you feel at home, you feel comfortable, you like your surroundings.

Okay. So: “girl” begins with “g” which is a consonant, so: “thuh girl. The girl felt at home in”, “empty” begins with “e” which is a vowel, so: “thee empty house. The girl felt at home in the empty house.” Okay. Next one: “I will join the union in the morning.” So, “union” is a… To do with your profession, for your employment rights and so on, and you pay a subscription to join. So: “I will join”, “union” begins with a “u” which is a vowel sound, so…

Ah, no, hang on. This is one of those exceptions. “Yunion”, so… I nearly caught myself out there. It’s a “ya” sound, so: “thuh union”. It’s not “thee” onion, because “onion” is a different word altogether, with an “o”, an onion is a vegetable, so this is the union. Okay, so: “I will join thuh union in”, “m” consonant, “thuh morning, the morning”. Okay. So that’s a funny little exception, there. Next one, say you’re in a big department store with lots of floors and they have escalators going up and down, and you can’t decide which department to go to first, so you’re with a friend, you might say: “Shall we take the up escalator or the down escalator?” Okay, so which one would you use? “Thuh” or “thee”? So, before “up”, “up”, letter “u” is a vowel sound, “up”, so it’s: “thee up, the up”.

“Shall we take the up escalator or”, then before “down”, “d” is a consonant, so: “thuh, the down escalator”. Okay? And then finally, here’s another one, a little exception because there’s an “h” here, which is not pronounced. So the word “honour”, “honourable”, it sounds like an “o”, we don’t pronounce the “h”, so: “It’s the honourable thing to do.” Which? Which would you use there? Okay, so: “It’s thee honourable”, this one. “…the honourable thing to do”. Okay, so I’m sure you got those all right, and we also have a quiz for you to test that a little bit further on the website, www.engvid.com, so do go to that and try that, see how many points you can get. And see you again soon. Okay. Bye for now.. “}

As found on Youtube

Hypnotherapy in Brighton

Learn English Grammar: Zero Conditional

{“en”:”Hello. We’re doing the zero conditional today. It’s a useful grammatical structure in English. Perhaps it’s used for, particularly to those who are rules-based people, who like knowing that A is going to result in B. My little nephew is like this. Hi, Alex. So, we’re doing the zero conditional. And this is about something that is generally true, like a scientific fact. If I press the toilet button, it flushes. Okay? “If”, condition, result. “If I do”, “If I play, this happens.” So this is in present simple, and the result also in the present simple. “If you heat ice, it melts.” So it’s like a scientific fact, it’s like something… This always happens in this same way. The condition always has the same result. Now, the result, this bit here, it can also be in the imperative rather than the present simple. So, I’ve put a little example here: “If you do…” “If you visit Devon,” -a place in the southwest of England-“go to Chagford.” Where I was born.

Okay? It’s a great place. So, it’s like “go to”, it’s an imperative. I’m telling you to do that. So this is a structure of command. “If you arrive late to my class again, you”, and then I’m going to need to… “You will have to go to the head master.” Okay? It’s the condition equals the result. It’s always the same. So if you’re late, you have to go to the head master. Okay? Condition, result, always the same relationship between the two. Now, we can have a couple of different, alternative options here. Instead of “if” we could also use “when” or “unless”.

I’ve written that unless… You know when… When’s talking about time, obviously. But “unless” means kind of if not, followed by the condition and result. Condition always in the present. So: “Unless if not he proposes”, obviously that’s quite weird, formal English. The translation would be something like… Or the simplification: “If he does not propose to marry you,”-to propose to marry you. Would you like to marry me?- “refuse to go on holiday with him again.” Okay? So: “refuse to go”, there you’ve got your imperative.

Okay? Now, we can change the order and put the result before the condition, and throw in a bit of “if” and “when” and “unless” right there in the middle just to mix things up, mix the bowl up. So, the result here is at the beginning. “The boss, my leader, the person who is in charge is angry” -again, notice present tense-“when I dance on my table.” Obviously, “when” could also be replaced by “if” there. “…if I dance on my table”. So, “when” would imply that I maybe dance on my table quite a lot. But “if”, I’m so scared of my boss that I don’t want to dance on my table. And “unless” would change it, so you’d have to have probably a different condition there. “The boss is angry unless I stay seated.” Okay, so let’s just have another quick recap. Something that’s generally true, like a scientific fact, like: “If I cross the road without looking, I get knocked over.” Sorry, that’s what the traffic’s like in London.

Pay attention. Look to your left, look to your right before it’s safe to go. “If”, condition, result. Present simple, present simple unless we’re using the imperative. “You will go to Chagford if you visit Devon.” And then we can mix in a bit of “when” and “unless”, meaning changing the positive, negative affirmation, so: “Unless he proposes to marry you,” blah, blah, blah, this will be the result. This will always be the result unless you do this. And then you can also have the result here and the condition here. The boss is angry if you don’t do the quiz right now and subscribe to my YouTube channel, and check out Exquisite English. Good night. God bless. See ya next time.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Studying English at a Language School

{“en”:”Hello, folks. So this morning, we’ve come along to a very good language school in London because we want to have a look at what it’s like to be a student in one of these schools. Come, and let’s find out. — Hi, Lee. — Hi, Ben. — So our viewers are learning English on the Internet. What would be an advantage of coming to a language school for a time to learn some English? — I think the key difference is that when you’re at a language school, then you are part of a whole experience. If you’re learning online, it’s great, but it’s for an hour or two, and that’s it.

Whereas if you come to the school, then you have complete immersion in a whole day of English if you like. If you’re staying with a host family, you have English experience before you come to school. All day, you’re speaking English, and if you take part in our social activities in the evening, then you’re carrying on. So it’s constantly learning and taking in and processing of new information. — Sure. So if someone was studying here and staying with a host family, they might share meals with the family. — Yeah. — And I guess there are students coming from many different countries. — Exactly. And of course, then you get this interaction with loads and loads of different students from all over the world, which, again, really challenges you in different ways when you’re learning English, I think. — And do students come here for a couple of weeks? — Some do. Some students come for a couple of weeks. Some students come for a year. It depends on what that student is looking for, what they need, what their plans are. So it can be either-or.

— And I guess it’s very exciting being here in London. You know, we’ve got a lot of English culture around us. — Of course. I mean, the history, the art, the literature, the theatre scene is just really advantageous to learning English. It’s just an amazing city. So to come and study here is a really good thing, I think. — Yeah. I mean, I guess the student can learn more the more they put themselves in an English environment, the more they speak.

— Exactly. If you immerse yourself in something completely, then you’re going to get more out of it, I think. — Cool. Well, is it possible to go and have a look at a class this morning? — Yeah. Absolutely. I think Dan is waiting for you upstairs. — Great. Thank you very much. –You’re welcome. –Let’s go upstairs. So let’s go and have a quick look now at a general English class and what that looks like in a language school. Okay. Come have a look. — Hi, there, Dan. — Hi. — Hi. We’ve just come to have a look at your general English class today. — Hello. — What exactly are you going to be doing in class today? — Today, we’re looking at the difference between literal and non-literal meanings of nine elements of vocabulary.

I was just asking Nir what he thought about the difference between “enough food” and “too much food”. So, sorry. — I think it depends. — Okay. In this meaning, do you think that it’s — if there is “lots of”, is it good or bad? — Yeah. It’s good. — Good? Would you agree, guys? It’s good? — I think it’s bad. — Okay. Hands up if you think it’s good. Nir, you stand alone, my friend. I’m sorry. Hands up if you think it’s bad. — In fact, that’s what I looked like last night at about 10:30. But what other words? Fly. That’s what I’m looking for, “fly”. Read the sentences with your partner.

I want you to decide two things. No. 1, which sentence is the literal meaning? Which sentence is the non-literal meaning. No. 2, what do you think the non-literal meaning means in other languages? Okay. Good. So it’s a word. You can use it, but it doesn’t mean what you think it means here. In this case, you mean “hard”, not “hardly”. — “To question.” “Question” can be a verb? — Yes. Of course. “I question.” Yeah. Good guess. Well done. So that was a great lesson from Dan. They’re really engaging in the teaching, and the students were obviously enjoying it. We’re going to go down to the lunch hall now and grab a bit of lunch. And then, we’ve got a couple of students who we’ll be talking to. They’re from different parts of the world. So I’m hungry. Let’s go and eat. [Crowd chatter] Well, that was a delicious lunch. And we enjoyed having a look at Dan’s class. Now, we’ve got three students at the London School of English here. And firstly, folks, could you tell me what course you’re doing and how long you have learned English for? So starting with Takami.

— I’m taking a Cambridge English examination preparation course. It’s called FCE. So just this course I have studied three weeks. Yeah. I have another five weeks. — Okay. And before, when you were in Japan, how long did you learn? Like, one year, two years learning English? Or — — Honestly, no. Nothing. — Nothing at all? Okay. Wow. Very interesting. Okay. Thanks. And Veronica? — I’ve done the general course for one month, and then I’ve started three weeks ago the CAE course, which is the Cambridge Advanced Exam. And that last — — Why did you choose this course? — The CAE? — Yeah. — Because I needed to get into university, and I’ve also heard that this academy prepares very well students to pass the exams. And I’ve been — — So you’re hoping to study in a university in England? — No, not in England, in Switzerland.

— Okay. — And they are asking for a B in CAE. And yeah. They’ve told me that this academy really will help you to pass the exam successfully. — Good luck to you. — Thank you. — And Francis, tell me, how long have you been learning English, and why did you decide to come and study in England? — I started English in secondary school and some more in university. And I decided to come here because I want to improve my English a lot. But only for pleasure. And for me, the best place to learn English is in London.

— Sure. — So I come here, and I’m learning here in this school. — Cool. Veronica, had you been studying in Spain how to speak English? — I’ve studied English in Spain, but with au pairs. At school as well, but the level in my school was pretty low. So yeah. The au pairs have helped me to get this fluency. — And how do you find the teachers different in London and in a language school compared to in a school where you’re from? — Well, I think that teachers here have more experience, and they do really know which mistakes do students make. Whereas the teachers in Spain, obviously, they are experienced as well, but not as much as a language teacher would be. — So they’re more specific? — Yeah. More specific. They know the mistakes that people from different countries make, and yeah. I think that’s the main reason, I think. — So Takami, do you feel you’re improving your English in a good way? — Yeah.

Just getting better. But of course, I need to more improve. But I feel that day by day getting my English better. — Cool. And so for all of you, it’s been stimulating; it’s been an interesting time being here? You’re obviously making really good friends here. Is it something you’d recommend to people? — Absolutely. You should go. — Yeah, definitely. Yeah. I’ve already spread it all over. — You should come here. It’s a life experience. You have to do it once at least in your life. I enjoy it a lot. I improve my English a lot. I make a lot of friends from different parts of the world.

So it is amazing. I enjoy it a lot. — So guys, I’ve lived in London for six years. And I feel I know it well, but for you coming to London, is it a good place to come to? Is it easy for you to speak to people and practice English being here in London? — Yes. I met some very friendly people in the pubs or wherever you are. And yeah. It’s very easy. For me, as I said, it’s a life experience to be here. So London, for me, it’s the capital of the world. — Wow. — It’s not the United States; it’s not Washington. It’s London. Very cosmopolitan. — London’s on the map. — Yeah. Absolutely. — And are there enough things for you to do? — Definitely. — On the weekends, for example, are there opportunities to do things? — Yeah. You won’t run out of chances or different activities to do.

One weekend, you can go and see a theatre play, a musical, and then visit different areas from the city. It is a very versatile city. You can go to the north of London, and it’s completely different from the south of London. So you won’t ever — — I feel like I’m in a different country in some parts. — Yeah. It’s like a country. So you won’t ever get bored of living here. — Great. So the best way for you guys to learn English, is it from reading? Is it from listening? Is it a mixture? What’s the best way? — I think it’s a mixture because you learn the grammar basics in class. Then, afterwards, you can socialize at lunch. And then afterwards, with the social program, you’re able to talk to everyone and get to know everybody and talk about your country, their country.

You learn different cultures. You — yeah. You get to socialize. — Is it difficult for you to speak English to someone from Spain? — Well, if we — — It was easy the first day that we met each other, so it’s easy. Yeah. If you met someone and you start speaking English, it’s easy to ongoing with that. — And if both of us want to speak English, then it’s okay. Because I know other Spanish students here that they feel that they want to speak Spanish with me, for example. But don’t do that because we are all here to improve our English, and we are interested in learning English, not in speaking our native language. — It’s true. — And here, you have the possibility to speak 24 hours. — That’s why it’s the best way.

— So after school, you can go to the pub. — No sleep. — Exactly. — We are trying to speak English even with same country people. — That’s cool. — It’s important. — Well, thank you so much for coming in and speaking today. It’s been really useful. And I hope there’s been something for you to learn back home. Thank you, guys. — Thank you.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Classroom English: Vocabulary & Expressions for Students

Hi. Welcome again to www.engvid.com. I’m Adam. Today’s lesson comes as a request, because I know that there are actually quite a few of you who are teachers of English, and you wanted to know some classroom English. So, today, we’re going to look at classroom English. This is more for beginners, especially people who have just joined an English class, an ESL class, EFL class, etc. and you’re starting to get used to the classroom environment, and you’re not exactly sure what the teacher is saying, what you should say, etc. We’re going to start with the teachers. What do teachers say that you need to understand? Okay? [Clears throat] Excuse me. First, the teacher will take attendance, or the teacher will take roll call. Sorry, these are two separate words, “roll call”. Basically, they want to know who is here and who is not here. Okay? So, if a student is in the class, he or she is present. So, if the teacher says: -“Bill?” -“Present.” -“Mary?” -“Present.” -“Bueller? Bueller? Bueller?” Bueller is absent. He or she is not in the class.

So, “absent”, not here. “Present”, here. If the teacher has finished with attendance and starts to teach the class, and a student comes in then, that student is late. And they get a little check. Too many lates, you get into trouble. Now, you could be absent, but you can have an excused absent, means that you have a note from your parents, from your doctor, from your boss, or the teacher just knows that you’re not coming today and it’s okay; it’s excused.

Now, the teacher will give you commands. He or she will tell you to do things. Okay? So, it’s very important that you understand what to do. If a teacher says: “Put up your hand”, or: “Raise your hand to ask a question, to make a comment, to ask to go to the bathroom”, put up your hand. Raise your hand. Don’t speak out. Because if everybody speaks out, it’s just noise. Put up your hand, ask your question, get your answer. Okay? Then, the teacher will ask you: “Take out your notebooks. Take out your pens.

Take out your earphones.” Basically, get them ready, we are going to use them. Okay. “Take your seats.” Basically means sit down, sit. Okay? So, he’s trying to get organized, or she is trying to get organized. Next, they’ll say: “Take out your book. Turn to page 37.” Means open your book, page 37, let’s start reading, working, etc. Now, if the teacher wants you to do things, but not alone… For example, if you’re doing math, yeah, you do it alone no problem. If you’re doing ESL, the teacher will want you to work in pairs. It means two people together, so you can speak. “Work in groups”, means get into a few people together; three, four, five. If he wants a specific number, he will say: “Get into groups of”, or: “Work in groups of three.” So, you find your two friends, three sit together, do the exercise. Now, if the teacher… As everybody’s talking, the teacher wants everybody be quiet and listen to one student, he will say or she will say: “Please pay attention to Jack. Jack is going to speak. Everybody, please pay attention to Jack.” Or if you’re doing exercise, if the teacher wants you to be careful about one word or one grammar structure: “Pay attention to the independent clause.” Means be very focused, be aware.

Okay? So, these are the basic things you need to know what… That your teacher will say. Now, you’re the student, you have questions or you don’t understand something, what are you going to say or what are you going to ask? Let’s see. Okay, so now, you’re the student and, you know, sometimes you don’t understand everything the teacher says. So, there are things you can say or ask from the teacher, of course, to help you.

If you didn’t hear something, what will you say? You could say: “I didn’t catch the last part.” Now, if you say: “I didn’t hear”, and I’m the teacher, I have been speaking for 10 minutes, and you say: “I didn’t hear.” I’ll say: “What? Everything? 10 minutes?” I can’t say again. So, “I didn’t hear”, or: “I didn’t catch the last part.” So, I will go back and say again the last part, or: “I didn’t hear the part about what to ask.” Or: “I didn’t hear the part about independent clauses”, or whatever the lesson is about. So, be specific. Tell the teacher which part you didn’t hear. He or she will say it again. Or you can just say: “Could you repeat that please?” Repeat, say again.

If you didn’t hear: “Could you repeat that please? Could you say that again?” But again, say which part. Be specific. Or: “I didn’t hear/catch what you said after here.” So, tell the teacher you heard everything until here, and from here, you didn’t hear, you didn’t catch. “Catch” means hear or understand. Okay? And if you’re having a lot of trouble, ask a teacher: “Can you please speak more slowly?” And the teacher will slow down, and it will be much easier for you to understand. Okay, now, if you are learning something… And again, we’re learning English and you’re not familiar with what the teacher says…

It’s something new or you don’t really know what it is, first of all, make sure you know how to spell the word. If it’s a new word, ask the teacher: “How do you spell that?” And the teacher will say: “S-p-e-l-l.” Spell. Okay? “How do you spell that?” Now, if you don’t know the meaning of the word and the teacher just continues speaking, put up your hand, say: “I’m sorry. What does this word mean?” And the teacher will explain to you. Now, if you’re learning in another country, you’re learning EFL, English as a foreign language, you can say: “How do you say this word?” in your language? If you’re learning in Japan: “How do you say ‘spell’ in Japanese?”, “How do you say ‘spell’ in Spanish?”, “How do you say ‘spell'” in any language? And: “What is this word in Japanese?”, “What is ‘spell’ in Japanese?” So, these two basically mean the same thing. By the way, these marks means same as what was above, just so you know. What is the word in your language? If you’re learning outside. If you’re learning in Canada, for example, and you say: “How do you say this word in Spanish?” I don’t know.

I don’t actually speak Spanish. I wish I spoke Spanish. I will learn one day, but for now, I don’t. So, you have to be careful. Okay. Finally, if you need a bit more information, you want the teacher to explain a little bit more, maybe you understand or you heard, but you’re not really sure. So, you can always ask for more specifics. “Can you use this word in a sentence?” So, for example, you heard the word, you understand the word, but you’re not sure how it would fit in a sentence, how to use it. Ask. “Can you use…?” Like, for the teacher: “Can you please use this word in a sentence so I can see how it works?” Or: “Can you give me”, or: “Can you give us”, the class, “an example of this?” Okay? So, for example, the teacher taught you about some new technology. You understand, but you want to see in real life what this means. So, you want examples of things that use this technology, so you ask.

Now, this is everything you need to know, teachers, students entering the classroom, but the most important thing you need to remember: if you don’t understand something, ask. There’s no such thing as a bad question or a stupid question, or you’re not sure about. If you’re not sure, ask. The teacher will be happy to tell you the answer. He or she will be happy to repeat a few times until you understand. I’m sure that other… Your classmates, other people in the class, they also have questions, but they are too shy to ask.

You ask. You get the answer, you move on. Okay? Go to www.engvid.com. If you have any questions for me, write them in the comments box. I will answer them. Do the quiz, make sure you understand everything. And come back again to www.engvid.com. Bye..

As found on Youtube

Learn English Speaking | vocabulary | people | parties

Hello hello hello everybody my name is Steve Ford And at this time of year a lot of people are are going to be having parties Yes it’s that festive season and I have a special lesson for you And were going to be talking about people that you would not invite To your party so let’s go Which kind of guest would you not invite? A party animal loves to party all the time A party pooper loves to ruin the party A party crasher comes on uninvited to the party A clingy guest never leaves you alone A flirt likes to seduce people A social butterfly talks to everybody for 30 seconds A wallflower is too shy to talk A performer likes to show off The first guest is a party animal This is somebody that loves parties so much They have to go to each and every single one they love to go to parties It’s their profession So if you have a party animal at your party probably they will be the last one to stay Party pooper a party pooper or a downer If somebody that is always saying something which is depressing Bringing everything and everyone down They are spoiling the party The party crasher this is somebody who is never invited to the party In the first place They just decide to drop in, visit you unexpectedly And this is somebody who often will spoil the party because they don’t fit in Yeah they don’t match with the rest of the people at the party The next one is clingy or needy guests Criimi means that it sticks to you That you can’t get rid of it it is like a glue it is sticky Or clingy So a clingy guest is somebody who’s always talking to you and then you say I Gotta go now Oh just one more last thing And they keep the conversation going and you can never get rid of them why? Because they’re clingy they are needy Flirt Is somebody who is always hitting on the guests or making a pass at the guests As they make their rounds Giving them that special look Or doing that special thing that attracts the opposite sex The texter, somebody who is texting people rather than talking to people at the party Somebody who looks like they don’t really want to be there Because they are not talking to people they are texting The social butterfly somebody who is very social and easygoing They like to make their rounds talking to everyone at the party From group to group from guest to guest To make sure that they can talk to everybody they only have 30 seconds to do it so So hi how are you? Blah, blah, blah! OK, Gotta go! The wallflower, traditionally used at a dance, a high school dance That’s the person that everybody’s on the dance floor But this person is standing off to the side and they don’t really want to talk to anybody Because they are shy The show off this is somebody that wants to be the center of attention So they could maybe take some dance classes and try to show off Their new dancing skills with their dancing partner It could be somebody who plays a musical instrument It could be somebody just wants to make a speech and gets up on the table So I hope you enjoyed all of these different kinds of guests that maybe you would not invite To your next party I hope that you all have a wonderful festive season this holiday season And I look forward to seeing you all in all our next English lesson Bye for now

As found on Youtube