The Norman Conquest – The History of English (2/10)

{“en”:”The History of English in ten minutes. Chapter 2: the Norman Conquest or excuse my English. 1066, true to his name William the Conqueror invades England bringing new concepts from across the channel like the French language, the Domesday book and the duty-free Galois multipack. French was ‘de rigueur’ for all official business with words like judge jury evidence and justice coming in and giving John Grisham’s career a kickstart. Latin was still used ad nauseam in church, but the common man spoke English, able to communicate only by speaking more slowly and loudly until the others understood him.

Words like cow, sheep and swine come from the english-speaking farmers while the a-la-carte versions, beef mutton and pork come from the french-speaking toffs, beginning a long-running trend for restaurants having completely indecipherable menus. All in all, the English absorbed about 10,000 new words from the Normans, though they still couldn’t grasp the rules of cheek kissing. The bonne amie all ended when the English nation took their new warlike lingo of armies, navies and soldiers and began the Hundred Years War against France. It actually lasted 116 years but by that point no one could count any higher in French and English took over as the language of power.. “}

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Study English in London

Learn English – English in Three Minutes – Asking About Names

{“en”:”Welcome to EnglishClass101.comu2019s English in Three Minutes. The fastest, easiest, and most fun way to learn English. Hey everyone, Iu2019m Alisha! This series will teach you some easy ways to ask and answer common questions in English. Itu2019s really useful, and it only takes three minutes! In this lesson, youu2019re going to learn some new ways to ask someone, u201cWhatu2019s your name?u201d including one that you can use when youu2019ve forgotten someoneu2019s name. Now, u201cWhat is your name?u201d was probably one of the first questions you learned when you started studying English.

I have to tell you, though, that most native speakers of English would never say this! In English, just like in other languages, it is often more polite to be a little indirect. Of course, the easiest way to avoid asking the question directly is to not ask at all! Just introduce yourself, and most people will respond by doing the same. When introducing yourself, simple is nearly always best. Just say… u201cHi, Iu2019m Alisha!u201d To show that you want to know the other personu2019s name, just add, u201cAnd you?u201d at the end. u201cHi, Iu2019m Alisha! And you?u201d u201cHi, Iu2019m Alisha! And you?u201d Just like before, take out my name, Alisha, and put your name in its place. After you say this, the other person will tell you his or her name. Okay, now letu2019s talk about an embarrassing situation that happens to EVERYBODY: youu2019ve already met this person once before, but youu2019ve forgotten their name! The most polite thing to do in this situation is to apologize and ask again.

Thereu2019s a simple way to do this thatu2019s also polite. u201cIu2019m sorry. What was your name again?u201d u201cIu2019m sorry. What was your name again?u201d This sentence is very similar to u201cWhatu2019s your name?u201d but it has three important differences. First, we say, u201cIu2019m sorry.u201d A small apology can go a long way. After that we say u201cWhat was your name?u201d This is just like u201cWhat is your name?u201d but instead of u201cisu201d, we use the past tense u201cwasu201d.

This is really important, as it tells the other person that you remember meeting them. You havenu2019t forgotten HIM or HER, youu2019ve just forgotten the NAME. This little word makes all the difference! u201cIu2019m sorry. What was your name…? Finally, we add u201cagainu201d to the end. This is another hint that tells the other person that you remember learning his or her name before, but you just canu2019t recall it right now. u201cIu2019m sorry. What was your name again?u201d This phrase is appropriate for both formal and informal situations. Now itu2019s time for Alishau2019s Advice! In the United States, itu2019s normal to address people by name in conversation more than once. In both formal and informal situations, itu2019s a way to show respect or interest in the other person, and can help you make friends.

It is also a great way to practice someoneu2019s name so you donu2019t forget it! If you are talking to someone named Ann, for example, instead of just: u201cWhat do you do for fun?u201d, you could say: u201cAnn, what do you do for fun?u201d You can also put the name at the end of the sentence: u201cWhat do you do for fun, Ann?u201d You donu2019t want to say the personu2019s name too often, or it will sound a little strange, but if you practice someoneu2019s name like this, you wonu2019t forget it. And people love to hear their own name! In this lesson, we learned what to say when we forget someoneu2019s name. In the next lesson, youu2019ll learn what to say when you want to get in touch with someone, whether by telephone, email, or even newer ways to communicate. Whatu2019s your favorite? Let us know in the comments, and join us next time for the sixth English in 3 Minutes lesson! See you next time!. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Learn English – Asking About Hobbies, What do you do for fun?

{“en”:”Welcome to EnglishClass101.comu2019s u201cEnglish in Three Minutesu201d. The fastest, easiest, and most fun way to learn English. Hey everyone, Alisha here! In this series, weu2019re going to learn some easy ways to ask and answer common questions in English. Itu2019s really useful, and it only takes three minutes! In this lesson, youu2019re going to learn how to ask what someoneu2019s hobbies are – without using the word u201chobbiesu201d! Youu2019ve probably seen the question, u201cDo you have any hobbies?u201d, or u201cWhat are your hobbies?u201d in an English textbook before.

However, native English speakers almost never use the word u201chobbiesu201d when asking about them! A much more natural way to ask the same question is: u201cWhat do you do for fun?u201d Letu2019s practice this question. u201cWhat do you do for fun?u201d u201cWhat do you do for fun?u201d You can also ask: u201cWhat do you do in your free time?u201d u201cWhat do you do in your free time?u201d So how would you answer this question? Letu2019s look at how native speakers would do it! The easiest way is to say: u201cI like to…u201d or just u201cI like…u201d followed by what you like to do. For example, if you like watching movies, you could say: u201cI like to watch movies.u201d or u201cI like watching movies.u201d u201cI like to watch movies.u201d or u201cI like watching movies.u201d And if you like golf, you could say: u201cI like to play golfu201d or u201cI like playing golfu201d.

u201cI like to play golfu201d or u201cI like playing golf.u201d You can emphasize how much you like your hobby by adding a word like u201creallyu201d in front of u201clikeu201d. For example: u201cI really like watching movies.u201d On the other hand, if you want to play down how much you like something, you can say u201ckind ofu201d. For example: u201cI kind of like playing tennis.u201d Now itu2019s time for Alishau2019s Advice! If you donu2019t have any special hobbies, or donu2019t want to be specific, a good way to reply is: u201cI like hanging out with my friends, and stuff like that.u201d u201cI like hanging out with my friends, and stuff like that.u201d Just use u201cI like…u201d and add u201changing out with my friendsu201d, and then add: u201cand stuff like that.u201d How do you answer the question: Where you from? It doesnu2019t even have a verb! Weu2019ll cover this and more in the next English in 3 minutes lesson. See you next time!. “}

As found on Youtube

Learn English in London