Vowels & Diphthongs – English Listening & Pronunciation Practice (Part 1)

{“en”:”Hello and welcome everyone. This Minoo at Anglo-Link. In the next two lessons, we’re going to focus on listening and pronunciation. We’re going to work on distinguishing the different vowels and diphthongs in the standard British accent. As I’ve mentioned to you in an earlier video, there are many vowels and diphthongs in the English language. And in order to improve your listening comprehension of native speakers, it’s important that you can distinguish between these different sounds clearly. Of course, as you know, certain sounds are pronounced differently in different accents, like in the American accent, Australian accent, even in different parts of Britain. However, I feel that the standard British accent is a good place to start. And from there, you can begin to learn the variations in the different accents as you come into contact with them. I have divided this lesson into two parts. In the first part, we’re going to contrast short vowels with their long version.

And we’ll do this in minimal pairs. As you know, minimal pairs are words that have the same consonant sounds and by changing the vowel sound we change the meaning. In the second part of this lesson, we’ll look at differences between certain vowels and diphthongs that sound very similar to each other. By the end of this two -part lesson, you will have tuned your ears into the vowels and diphthongs in the standard British accent. This will have improved your listening comprehension of this particular accent and will have also improved your own pronunciation. So, when you’re ready, we can begin with part one.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

British vs American | English Pronunciation Lesson

Hello and welcome everyone. This is Minoo at Anglo-Link. Today, we’re going to look at some differences in American English and British English pronunciation. In order to do that, I’ve teamed up with my American colleague Rachel, who is going to introduce herself to you now. I’m Rachel and I have a YouTube channel called ‘Rachel’s English’. My channel focuses on American English pronunciation. There are videos that go over the specific mouth proposition for each sound, videos that focus on the rhythm of American English, linking, and videos that show you how to listen to the characteristics of American English.

There are over two hundred and fifty videos with two added each week. I hope you’ll check them out. Thank you Rachel. Okay, I will be focusing on the differences between the consonants ‘r’ and ‘t’ and also some very common words that are pronounced differently in American English and British English. Rachel will be focusing on the differences between some vowel sounds. Let’s start with the letter ‘r’. When the letter ‘r’ is in the initial position of a word or in the middle of a word, there isn’t a huge difference between the way Americans or British people pronounce it.

However, listen to me saying the following four words and then listen to Rachel saying them. Now, when the letter ‘r’ is in the middle position in a monosyllabic word and after a vowel, after a vowel, in British English we tend to drop it. We also drop the letter ‘r’ at the end of words in British English, whereas in American English, there is no difference. Now, I’d like you to listen to me saying the following words and then listen to Rachel saying the same word immediately. Right then, let’s move on to the letter ‘t’. In standard British English, the letter ‘t’ is always pronounced as a /t/, whether it is at the beginning of a word, in the middle of a word or at the end of a word; whether it’s a stressed syllable or unstressed syllable.

For example, listen to these four words. However, in American English they tend to drop the ‘t’ in the final position. So, now listen to Rachel saying these four words. Now, listen to her saying the words ‘what’ and ‘cut’ again. Now, in American English, when the letter ‘t’ is in the middle position in a word, it sometimes changes to a soft (d). This happens either when it’s between two vowels or when it’s between an ‘r’ and a vowel. So, now listen to how I pronounce the following words, and immediately to how Rachel pronounces them. And finally, in American English, the letter ‘t’ is sometimes dropped after an ‘n’.

For example, in British English, we would say: Now, listen to how Rachel pronounces them. Okay, that’s all for the consonants ‘r’ and ‘t’. Now we’re going to look at some very common words in English, that are pronounced quite differently in British English and American English. So, I’m going to say them and then you listen to how Rachel says them. Well, I hope you’ve enjoyed this part of the lesson. To continue this lesson with Rachel, click here. She will be telling you about the differences in vowel sounds. If you want to subscribe to our channel, click here. And if you want to subscribe to Rachel’s Channel, click here. Thank you for watching. I look forward to seeing you in our next video. Bye now!.

As found on Youtube