Gabriella [ ForB English Teachers ]

{“en”:”Hi everyone. My name is Gabriella and I’m from England in the UK. My hometown is Durham. It’s close to Newcastle. My hobbies are yoga, photography and I love to travel. I love all Japanese food and I have been living in Japan a few years now. I’m really looking forward to teaching you all here at For B English, so please join us.. “}

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Hypnotherapy in Brighton

English Lesson 2 – What’s this? School English. | Learn English for kids with Gogo.

{“en”:”What’s this? Look, Gogo! What’s this? It’s a box! Open it please, Gogo. What’s this? It’s a plate. What’s this? It’s a bowl. This is a knife. This is a fork. Gogo! Look! A shark! What’s this? It’s water. Hello! Watch new Gogo lessons with Erick and Nicole. Click here. Page 9. Unit 2. What’s this? Conversation. Listen and look. Page 10. Vocabulary. Listen and say. Page 10. Target. Listen and say. Page 11. Practice 1. Listen and number. Number 1. Number 2. Number 3. Number 4. Page 11. Practice 2. Your turn! Listen and answer. Page 12. Chant. Listen and chant. Book, pen, desk, chair. Page 12.

Activity 1. Listen say and circle. Page 14. Alphabet. Number 1. Listen, point and say. Page 14. Number 2. Listen and chant. Duck, egg, fish. Page 6. Unit 2. What;s this? Number 1. Listen and circle. Page 9. Number 3. Listen to the chant and mark. Page 7. Point to the picture and say the word. Page 8. Point to the words that start with letter c. Now point to the words that start with letter d. Now, point to the words that start with letter c. Let’s do coloring pages. D Duck. Diver. Dog. E Eraser. Elephant. Eagle. F Fish. Fan. Flamingo. Book Skype English classes for children at WWW.ELICLASS.COM. “}

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The 4 Main Meanings of the word Crook English Teacher Mark’s English Lessons Aussie Slang ESL EFL

{“en”:”Hey guys, how are you going? Freezing hey, absolutely freezing today. Today as promised we are going to look at the word CROOK. There are 4 main uses of the word crook. Um yeah, 4 ones that we use commonly, there may be others but I wouldn’t worry about them too much, this is enough for now. So the first one crook, I’m crook, I’m sick, I’m as crook as a dog, I feel crook in the guts, Oh my guts, my stomach, I feel crook in the guts, yeah? You can also say, I’m feeling crook, yeah? My wife’s crook, the kids are crook, everyone’s crook.

Um, I’ve just written some notes, I’ll just check I’ve got them all here, Oh you can ask a question, Um,” Are you feeling crook?” Sick, “are you feeling sick?” Um, “Have you been crook,” “Where have you been crook? Where have you been? Have you been crook?” Yeah, so. Anyway that’s the first one and I’ve written some notes for you to look underneath the video, there’s um, a comprehensive lot of notes, um so you can check up on that as well. o.k? The second meaning is, um for a part of your body to not be working well. So for example you could say, “I’ve got a crook back.” which means I’ve got a bad back.

Yeah, or “I’ve got a crook knee, it’s not good, it hurts in the cold. Maybe like today, it’s freezing, maybe your knee plays up in the cold, which means, If it plays up it means, it doesn’t work well, yeah, maybe, you’ve got arthritis or something, um, yeah, so let me just check, other words that you can use instead of crook here are words like dodgy which means not good and we’ll look at in another lesson but you can say I’ve got a dodgy knee or a dodgy back yeah or a dodgy ticker T I C K E R means “heart,” I’ve got a dodgy ticker it means I’ve got a bad heart I’ve gotta be careful. Um yeah or “bung,” a very Aussie word, B U N G I’ve got a knee or I’ve got a bung leg, yeah, um yeah I’ve got some sentences here for example, ‘She’s got a crook back, she shouldn’t be lifting anything heavy.

O.k. So that’s the second meaning for your body part not to be working well. The third meaning can mean and this is not slang this is just a word um used as a noun, like he’s a crook, um like a criminal an untrustworthy person, you wouldn’t trust them, yeah, so ” Be careful of that guy, he’s a crook.” For example, someone who’s like does um yeah small crimes like stealing and car theft they’re a small time crook. Big, big time crook you know like mafia type, type people, um, yeah really really bad dudes anyway, um, so yeah for example um, “She was a crook, (past tense) she was a crook but she’s changed now.” And oh as an adjective you can actually use it as an adjective that um for example he’s crooked which means he’s he’s not honest yeah, if you’re straight, then this means that you are um you’re not dishonest, there’e another meaning but we won’t go into that now, o.k.

Um the fourth meaning I’ve got here um this is very Aussie again and not not as common as the others but it’s still used a lot in Australia, if somebody goes crook on you they get angry with you, so for example, “My mum went crook on me last night, my mum went crook on me last night because I hadn’t done my homework,” yeah? Or “I’ll get crook on you if you, um, yeah, if you don’t clean up your mess, so you can say, “on you, with you,” um often, more often on you, I’ll get crook you, it sounds quite strange but it’s just an expression which means angry, so yeah you can say, “Dad went crook on me because I smashed his car,” which my dad actually did go crook on me and fair enough I I smashed 2 of his cars and blew up another motor, so he went crook on me and I I probably deserved that, sorry dad, um, yeah, that was a long time ago, all is forgiven now.

Um there is another meaning, actually, I’ll just give you the question for that, ” Did your parents go crook on you for getting home so late last night?” That’s another way of saying get angry with you. but there another word “crooked,” which means not straight, yeah, for example here, you can see here, I’ve drawn a crooked line, it’s not straight and underneath a straight line o.k? So that’s a different meaning although in some ways it’s similar isn’t it? You could have your hat on crooked, here it’s on straight, hey man you recognise that? Or it can go on crooked, yeah, maybe your collar is crooked, your shirts all crooked, um or a picture, the picture’s straight here now, let’s bring that a bit closer for you, it’s straight, now it’s crooked so you need to straighten up, it’s crooked, now it’s straight, crooked, straight, o.k.

um, that’s it for today, I hope you learnt a lot, it’s a well used word, um worth learning all of those meanings because we do use it in many different ways, o.k. I think next time, we’ll have a look at the word, “dodgy,” to help you out with some more Aussie slang, this is Mark from Mark’s English lessons, Aussie slang, um, thank you guys for all the likes and subscriptions, and for supporting me and I’ll continue to support you o.k? Have a great day, keep warm, rug up, rug up, R U G means to keep warm, yeah, you wear a hat,a scarf, beanie, well hat and beanie the same thing, but keep warm, wear a nice big jumper and jacket. O.k take care, see you soon. Bye.. “}

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Stop smoking

Present Simple vs Present Continuous – Learn English Tenses (Lesson 1)

{“en”:”Hello everyone and welcome to the first instalment of our grammar lessons. As I said in the introduction, we’ll be starting with the tenses And you’ve guessed right. The first two to learn are Present Simple and Present Continuous. So, I’ve made a presentation for you, and I’m going to now take you through the examples on this presentation and explain the usage of these two tenses. So by the end of this session you know exactly when to say ‘I do’ and when to say ‘I am doing’. So, Let’s go over to the presentation now.. “}

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‘Shut Up!’ Conversation: Learn English Conversation With Simple English Videos

{“en”:”Whatu2019s orange and sounds like parrot? Carrot. A carrot rhymes with parrot. Ha! Come on. Jay, weu2019re trying to work. Whatu2019s red and smells like blue paint? Red paint. Get it? Red paint. Ha! Jay, Iu2019ve got one for you. Yeah? Whatu2019s loud and sounds like shut up? I donu2019t know, what? Shut up.. “}

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English Lesson 1 – Hello. What’s your name? | English with cartoons and songs from Gogo

{“en”:”Gogo’s adventures with English. Lesson 1. My name’s Gogo. Hello. Hello. My name’s Tony. What’s your name? Name? Name? Name? My name’s Tony. What’s your name? My name’s Gogo! Tony! Tony! Hello! Hello! My name’s Gogo. What’s your name? My name’s Jenny. Hello, Gogo. How are you? How are you? I’m fine, thank you. I’m fine, thank you. How are you, Tony? I’m fine, thank you. How are you? Tony. Jenny. What’s your name? My name’s Gogo. What’s your name? My name’s Tony. How are you? I’m fine, thank you. How are you? I’m fine, thank you. What’s your name? My name’s Jenny. What’s your name? My name’s Gogo. Tony, Jenny, Gogo! Tony. Jenny. Goodbye, Gogo. Goodbye, Gogo. Goodbye, Jenny. Goodbye, Tony. My name’s Gogo. What’s your name? My name’s Gogo. What’s your name? My name’s Jeeby. My name’s Jeeby. My name’s Tapy. What’s your name? What’s your name? Your name’s Pod. Hello. My name’s Jenny. Hello. My name’s Tony. How are you? I’m fine thank you how are you? I’m fine, thank you. Who are they? Look and say.

Page 3. Unit 1: Hello! Conversation. Listen and look. Page 4. Vocabulary. Listen and say. Page 4. Target. Listen and say. Page 5. Practice 1. Listen and number. Page 5. Practice 2. Your turn! Listen and answer. Page 6. Song. Listen and sing. Page 8. Alphabet. Number 1. Listen, point and say. Page 8. Number 2. Listen and chant.. “}

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Learn English Expressions: JUST IN CASE

{“en”:”Hello. My name is Emma and in today’s video I am going to teach you about a very important piece of vocabulary — it’s also very important when it comes to grammar — and that is the expression: “Just in case” or we can also say: “in case”. So, we use this a lot in English, so it’s very… It’s something very important for you to learn. So let’s talk about what it means and how we use it.

So, we use: “in case” or “just in case”-we use both-when we are talking about doing something to prevent a problem. Okay? So we’re talking about… Or doing something to prepare for a problem. So, we’re looking at a problem and we’re looking at preparation or prevention of that problem. Okay? So, for example: “Tonight, I am going to a restaurant.” I’m very excited. Now, the problem is I get cold very easily, and when I’m cold I’m not a very nice person; I get very cranky, and I’m not a good person to be with when I’m cold. So my problem is I get cold easily. What is my prevention or preparation for this problem? Well: “I will bring a sweater just in case I get cold.” Okay? And that way I will have a great time at the restaurant, hopefully. So my problem is being cold, and my preparation is I’m going to bring a sweater.

So, as you can see, if you think about life, we have a lot of these types of problems and we do a lot of things to prepare for these types of problems. So let’s look at some other examples. Okay, a problem is when it rains… Okay? A lot of the times when it rains, you know, I don’t like getting wet, so what do I do? Well, my preparation or prevention is I bring an umbrella, or maybe I’ll bring a rain jacket.

Okay? So: “I will bring an umbrella just in case it rains.” Another problem is if you work at 9am, you know, a lot of the times there’s a lot of cars; everybody’s going to work at the same time, there’s a lot of traffic. And if there’s a lot of traffic maybe you’ll be late for work. So what will you do for this problem? So, traffic is the problem or maybe going to work late is the problem, but what you can do to prevent or prepare for this problem is you can leave your house early.

So: “I leave my house early every day just in case there’s traffic.” Another example of a problem is maybe you’re going to visit your friend, and your friend gives you their address. Now, if you don’t write down their address, you’re going to be lost. I don’t know where they live. I need to go to my friends’ house, I forget their address; I don’t know where they live. So this is the problem. Especially if you’re very forgetful like me or you always forget people’s phone numbers or, you know, where people live, this is a big problem.

So what do you do to prevent this problem? Well, you write down their address. Okay? On a piece of paper, your friend tells you their address, you write it down. Why do you write it down? “You write down their address just in case you forget it.” Okay? You forget their address. So I’ve just given you some examples of where we would use “just in case”. There are a lot of examples for “just in case”. I want you to think about your life.

Is there something that happens every day to you, maybe you have some sort of problem or something you worry about? So think about that for a second. Is there something you worry about every day, and what do you do to prepare for that or to prevent a problem from happening? Okay? Maybe, you know, you’re worried about failing your test, so you might create a study group just in case. Okay? Or maybe, you know, your teacher gives you homework. Maybe you will do the homework just in case they want to see it. So, you see what I’m saying? There’s a lot of problems you might have, and a lot of preventions or preparations you do for those problems.

So try to think of one in your own life. Okay, so now we are going to look at the grammar of “just in case” or “in case”. Okay, so we’ve already looked at what are problems, and how we prepare or prevent problems. Now let’s look at some examples of: How do we create this sentence in a grammatical fashion? So, I have here the sentence: “I will bring an umbrella in case it rains.” Do you remember what the problem is? The problem is it rains, and the preparation is bringing an umbrella.

I have another sentence. “I will leave my house early in case there is traffic.” So, again, traffic is the problem, and leaving my house early is the preparation or the prevention of a problem. So, I have a couple of questions for you about the grammar. Okay? I want you to look at the sentences, both of these sentences: Is the problem…? So the problem we’re talking about, do you see the problem before or after the expression “in case”? So where is the problem? So we find “in case”.

Is the problem before “in case”, up here; or is the problem after “in case”? It’s after, right? So, “it rains” is the problem, so: “in case it rains”, these go together. What about down here? “…in case”, is the problem before the word “in case” or is it after the word “in case”? Well, the problem is traffic, so the problem comes after the word “in case”. Okay? So if it helps you to remember: “in case”… So we wouldn’t write this in a sentence. This is… We won’t put these brackets in a sentence, but just to help you in your head to remember: “in case” is with the problem, so these are like one unit, if that makes sense. Okay. And so if the problem comes after “in case”, what comes before “in case”? The preparation or the prevention. So after “in case” is the problem, before is the prevention or the preparation. Okay, so what verb tense comes after “in case”? So when we’re talking about the problem, what is the verb tense that we use when we’re talking about the problem? So I want you to look, here’s the verb and here is the other verb.

Is this the past, the present, or the future? If you said the present, you are correct. We use the present tense when we use “in case”. Okay? And so: “in case it rains”, we could put this… You know, imagine if I said: “I will bring a sweater in case it gets cold”, so the part after “in case” is always in the present tense. Okay. So another question you might be wondering: “Do ‘in case’ and ‘just in case’ mean the same thing? Can I use either, ‘in case’ or ‘just in case?'” “I will bring an umbrella just in case it rains” or “in case it rains”, they’re both correct. It’s your choice; you can use whichever one you prefer.

Okay, and these two sentences use the word “will”: “I will leave my house early”, “I will bring an umbrella”, so this is talking about, you know, doing something in the future, right? “In the future I will bring an umbrella”, or “In the future I will leave my house early”. Do we always use “will” when we use…? When we’re making these types of sentences? Can I say: “I always bring an umbrella in case it rains” or “I brought an umbrella in case it rains”? Can I use the past, present, or future, or is it always the future? Actually for “just in case”, you can use “will”, you can use the past tense, or you can use the present tense when you’re talking about the preparation. So the problem… We’re talking about a future problem, this stays in the present tense; but in terms of the preparation, it depends on when you do the preparation. So the key question here is: When did you prepare, or when did you prevent the problem? So I’ll give you some examples. Imagine for this one: Yesterday I brought an umbrella to work because today I knew it would rain.

So if in the past, if yesterday or earlier today, you know, I brought an umbrella, we could change this to: “brought”. “I brought an umbrella in case it rains”. “…in case it rains” stays the same. Okay? It’s always in the present. But before the preparation we can use the past. Or what about if, you know… For example, the second sentence, imagine I always leave my house early, every day. Okay? I always do it. It’s a routine. “I will leave my house early in case there’s traffic.” If it’s a routine and it always happens, I can use the present tense here, I can say: “I always leave my house early in case there is traffic.” Okay? Or if we’re talking about something I’ll do in the future to prepare: “I will leave my house early in case there is traffic.” So, bottom line, the key point here, the thing that you really got to remember: After “in case” this is always the present.

Okay? So, after the words “in case”, the verb is the present; but when you’re talking about what you’re doing, the preparation, it depends on when you prepare. If you’re preparing… If the action of preparing is in the past, you use the past; if it’s a routine that you always do, you use the present; or if it’s something you’re going to do, use the future. Okay? So let me think if I can give you another example. Okay, if we think about a test and studying, I can say: “I studied hard for my test yesterday in case my test is hard.” Or, sorry: I studied…

Yeah. “I really studied for my test yesterday in case the test is hard”, so we have it in the past, I studied in the past. Now if, you know, maybe I always study for a test and I always really study hard for a test, I can say it in the present: “I always study for a test in case it’s hard.” Or, you know, maybe I’ve never done that before, but maybe tomorrow I’m going to study, I can say: “I will study, you know, for my test in case it’s hard.” Okay? So it depends on when you’re doing that action. All right, so we’re going to look at a couple more examples, you know, to get you more practice and more familiar with “in case” and “just in case”. Okay, so in my life I get hungry a lot. And just like when I get cold I’m not really a happy person, when I get hungry I’m not a happy person.

So in order to make sure I stay happy, I always try to have food with me. So, for example, I’ve made a sentence with “just in case” or “in case”: “I brought a sandwich today in case I get hungry.” So what’s the problem here? The problem is when Emma’s hungry she’s a horrible person to be around. Okay? So, we have a problem: Emma’s hungry. So, what do we do to make sure Emma, you know, stays like a happy person? Well, we make sure she takes a sandwich with her, so that’s the preparation. Okay? And, again, after “in case” we have the problem, before we have the preparation. Okay, and this, again, is in the present tense. And this one is in the past tense because I already brought the sandwich. Okay? This is something I did this morning. Now, it is possible to change the structure of the sentence around.

You don’t have to, so if you think: “Wow, Emma, today I learned a lot, I don’t want to, you know, learn anymore”, that’s okay, you’ve learned a lot. But if you’re interested, we can also change the sentence and put it in the opposite way. So what do I mean by that? Well, in this case “in case” is the second part of the sentence; we can also put it as the first part of the sentence. “In case I get hungry,”-so it’s the exact same words, we just add a comma-“I brought a sandwich”. So it’s your choice, they have the exact same meaning. You can start with “In case” or “in case” can be in the middle of the sentence. But when you start with “In case”, just make sure you remember the comma. Up here there’s no comma. Okay? So, for a lot of people this is easier because they, you know, forget their commas, but we do use both. Okay, let’s look at another example. “I always keep medicine at home in case I _______ sick.” Okay? So if you think about it, a lot of people will have medicine for headaches, or for when they catch a cold, they keep medicine at home.

So what’s the problem here? The problem is getting sick. Okay? So, the problem is getting sick, and how do we prepare for that? Well, we have medicine at home. So, after “in case” I want to use the verb “get” here. What do I need to do to the verb “get”? Is it going to be in the past tense as in “got”, do I say “get”, or “will get”? What tense do I use? If you said “get”, which is the present tense, you are correct. Yay. Good for you. I hope you got that. “I always keep medicine at home in case I get sick.” And, again, this is in the present because it’s something we do as a routine, we’re always doing this. Okay, so the last example: “I’ll go early just in case there is a line.” So imagine you’re going to the movie theatre, and you know a lot of the times with movie theatres there’s a long line up -that’s a problem.

A long line up is a problem, so what do you do to prevent that problem or to prepare for it? Well, you go to the movie theatre early so you can line up and make sure you get a good seat. So, in this case I’ve used the word “just in case”. “I’ll go early to the movie theatre just in case there is a long line.” Do I need to use, like, all of this? Can I just say: “I’ll go early just in case”, and not even say this? That’s possible. So if you don’t even want to do this, you can actually just say: “I’ll go early just in case” as long as the person you’re talking to knows, like, the context and can understand what you’re talking about, and it’s obvious, you know, what you’re doing, you can just use “just in case” instead of the full sentence.

Okay? So, even up here: “I always keep medicine at home”, you probably keep medicine at home in order… Like, in case you get sick, it’s kind of obvious, so if you wanted to, you can just say: “…just in case”. Okay? So there’s a couple of ways we can use “just in case”. You’ve learned a couple of different ways today. You will hear all of these different variations in conversation, in movies, on TV. Again, “just in case” and “in case” is very common and very important; we use it a lot.

So you might hear any of these variations of it. So, I hope you have enjoyed this lesson. And just in case you want to practice more, you can come visit our website at www.engvid.com, and there you can do our quiz. Now, in case, you know, maybe you didn’t understand the video, like, completely or maybe there’s some confusion, in case you’re confused, watch the video again.

Okay? You can get a lot from watching these videos multiple times. I also want to invite you to come subscribe to our channel; there you can find lots of other videos on things like pronunciation, vocabulary, writing, IELTS. You know, we have so many different types of videos and, you know, on a lot of useful things like grammar and, you know, all sorts of different types of topics. So I really recommend you check that out. Until next time, thanks for watching and take care.. “}

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How to Stop Translating in Your Head and Start Thinking in English Like a Native

{“en”:”Hey, Naturals. What’s up? It’s your favorite American English teacher Gabby here with a Go Natural English lesson to help you to stop Translating everything from English into your native language in your head in your mind and your brain in your noggin and to start thinking only in English it is Possible believe me no matter what level you’re at right now It’s possible to think in English And I’m gonna show you how I’m gonna give you 9 Tips that will help you on your journey to thinking just like a native English speaker So if this is interesting to you, then keep watching So first of all, what’s the problem with translating everything Into your native language before you come up with a response in English. Well if you’re in a Conversation or some situation where you need to really process information quickly and be able to respond rapidly in an appropriate timely manner Then you really don’t have time to translate Even if you’re super smart which I know you are and you’re really good at English.

Which I know you are it still takes time to process all the information you’re getting in English into your native language and then Think in your native language, okay, what am I gonna say how am I gonna respond and then translate that Back into English it’s a lot of work for your brain to do and no matter how Awesomely intelligent you are it’s gonna take too long in a native speed kind of fast back and forth conversation so if you are in a social situation if you’re in a meeting at work if you are at a Presentation and you want to ask questions You really need to be able to think in English So the problem started with the way that we learn Foreign languages this happened to me when I was learning Spanish in the classroom How did we learn we learn through translating with Spanish I learned that one is Uno and two is dos and Let’s see coffee is Cafe and So on so of course it’s easy, and it makes sense to begin this way because we know vocabulary in our native language but it actually is hurting us once we get into Conversational English or in my case conversational Spanish, so when I left the classroom When I left my English sorry my Spanish classroom And I tried to have a conversation with native Spanish speakers I was like in total shock my jaw hit the ground because I Couldn’t understand anything and I definitely couldn’t respond because I was trying to just Identify a few words that I could recognize that I could hear that I could listen to that I could comprehend and then Translate those into English and then think in English to translate back into Spanish And I was a wreck so I don’t want that to happen to you Maybe you know how that feels already let me give you some suggestions to get you started thinking in English first let’s start small Understanding everything in English and being able to respond in English is like a big meal.

That’s a lot of vocabulary or a lot of food to digest right so let’s start by taking small bites and digest thoroughly so start by doing small daily activities in English so for example Every day, I take my dog for a walk or sometimes we go for a run so sometimes I talk to him usually in English, but sometimes just to really confuse him I talked to him in Spanish and instead of saying come let’s go I’ll say ven, vamonos right so you could do this in English Maybe if you have a pet or if you don’t have a pet there’s other ways, too I bet you have a phone if you have a smart phone you could set that in English so that every time you open up your phone there’s English vocabulary For you to work with this is an example of an everyday Activity probably multiple times a day you’re looking at your phone that you could do in English And maybe there’s other things that you can think of too So what are some other suggestions of small daily activities that you could do in English? Comment let me know what you think Okay, next listen to more English this doesn’t even have to take up more of your time You can give yourself an immersive experience in English no matter where you are Open up your laptop or your smartphone and download Some podcasts in English or listen to internet radio or put on a video on YouTube or on Netflix in English and play it in the background while you’re doing other work that doesn’t require intense focus I love doing this when I’m just doing housework or like organizing stuff around my room or my office or whatever I will listen to music and other languages because I love learning the lyrics to songs in Spanish or in Portuguese or in other languages that I want to learn so most recently I was Listening in Spanish to the song called Lloraras Which is a famous salsa song I highly recommend it if you’d like to get into Salsa But anyway, let me continue with tips for thinking in English 3 try Guessing or Planning what native English speakers are going to say in that next Conversation or in that presentation or whatever situation that you’re going to be in in English so when you predict based on your life experience what you think people are going to say You will be more prepared and more confident You’re preparing your brain to receive that information And you’d be surprised probably like eight out of ten times You’re going to be correct now.

Don’t get too attached To your prediction because of course other people don’t know that script that’s going on in your head So be prepared for something different to come out of people’s mouths but just by exploring the different options or your Prediction or guess of what you think will happen you’re gonna feel way more Confident, and you’re gonna be able to process that information Faster and to think in English yourself because you’re already thinking when you predict what’s going to happen in a conversation four stop learning exclusively through translation Especially once you’re out of your beginner English class we have to learn through association through Experience through observing watching listening through touching through your life experience you have to Associate the word with the meaning and not the English word with your native language word Okay, words are just where they’re just letters, okay? The real true meaning is what you understand and then you can attach that to the word okay? So book is not necessarily livro in in Spanish or Portuguese It’s a thing with pieces of paper and writing that I can read and learn from so I hope this is making sense But you have to stop learning exclusively through Translation and next very closely related number five is to stop using a bilingual dictionary the best use of your bilingual dictionary where there’s English and then your native language is actually as like a Coaster where you put your coffee cup on On top of your table, so it doesn’t leave a circle on your table That’s the best use for it because if you continue to use this bilingual dictionary to learn vocabulary In English you’re always going to be practicing translation so just use that thing as a coaster or whatever and use a monolingual dictionary instead monolingual means one language so English to English and you’re going to exponentially expand your English language vocabulary when you do this next number six label objects in your environment in English you can just do this in your head It’s super simple super fast and easy doesn’t cost anything or you could actually write the words on paper and tape Those labels right to the objects or use sticky notes or something and for example if I see a book and I’m learning Spanish Then I would write on my sticky note libro And I think I said Livro before, but that’s actually portuguese I get confused between Spanish and portuguese I will tell you honestly it is not always easy to learn both at the same time so anyway Libro is booked if I’m learning Spanish Maybe livro if I’m learning Portuguese hey if I’m learning Arabic It’s kitab you can help me with my pronunciation in the comments, but put a label on everyday objects This is really especially helpful for beginners intermediate Level English learners, but it can be fun to do just to remind yourself to think in English at any level Number 7.

Talk to yourself in English when you talk to yourself out loud It does so many good things for you Not only are you going to practice your pronunciation your speaking your vocabulary your fluency But you are developing that thinking and English skill so what kind of things should you say when you’re talking to yourself out loud in English and When should you do this well first of all I would suggest doing this perhaps in the privacy of your own home Maybe not around your co-workers or people that might think you’ve gone crazy So what do you tell yourself? Well, you could ask yourself questions for example right now I’m thinking what am I going to eat for lunch today? So if I am trying to improve my Portuguese I might think to myself and say out loud “O que vou comer hoje no almorco?” Yeah, think that’s right.

If it’s not you can tell me in the comments but it’s okay if you make a mistake talking out loud to yourself if your grammars not perfect if your pronunciation is not perfect it’s okay because the point is not to be perfect the point is for you to develop that habit of Thinking and speaking the language so it’s totally okay Just make a mental note of what you’re not sure about if you are not sure if you’re supposed to use like the article the or whatever it is you’re not sure about and then you could ask someone just like I asked you in the Comments, you could ask your native speaker friend your teacher or do some research online Another way, I really love to talk to myself out loud in languages I’m learning is to sing a song so I mentioned earlier that I was Listening to a song called Lloraras, which means you will cry it’s kind of a sad song actually, but I love to actually sing that song when I’m Just you know doing house chores or walking my dog I’ll just be like yeah se que tu no quieres que yo a ti te quiera So I’m not a great singer so I’m gonna stop but just to give you an example That is what I love doing and I might even mix in some Salsa dance moves.

Well, I’m singing eight just start thinking in English with a Mantra or a motto or some phrase that just gets you started like on autopilot Automatically so my phrase might be I am improving my English every day And I would say that in English out loud to myself or just think it okay if I’m learning Portuguese I might say to myself Bom dia, a cada dia estou melhorando meu portugues. Yes, okay like with Emotion is really important really really important even if I look crazy It doesn’t matter it does help you and it lifts your spirits, and it gives you energy to improve your language skills finally number nine Our last tip to help you think in English is to just do a little bit each day So don’t force yourself to think in English all day every day from the get-go or from the beginning just start with 30 seconds, I’m sure that you can think in English for 30 seconds.

You could set an alarm Maybe every day at 9 a.m.. You’re going to think in English for 30 seconds So you know on your phone put an alarm for 9 a.m. And you can title it think in English And then set your timer for 30 seconds and just think in English no matter How simple or how silly it is You can just say hello to yourself over and over and over for 30 seconds. If that’s the best you can do I know you can do better. I know But it’s just an example that it doesn’t matter how complicated your English is when you train to think in English What does matter is that you Start and that you are consistent. So do a little bit every day And you’re going to be thinking in English all day long in no time if you loved these suggestions Let me know in the comments share this video with Your friends who are learning English or maybe your friends who are learning other languages because these tips totally apply to any language you are learning Thank you so much for watching be sure to subscribe to Go Natural English here on YouTube visit the website at GoNaturalEnglish.com and Thank you mwah.

Love you guys. I’ll see you again soon. Bye for now. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Steps to Learning English: Where should you start?

{“en”:”[Singing] Hi. James. Greer. James Greer. From engVid. [Laughs]. Not Bond, and I know you think I was going to say Bond. I know. But listen, Bond always has an important mission he’s got to do, right? 007. And so do I. Today we have a mission. We’re going to learn how to study English. I know in many places, many websites, they tell you, and to teach you grammar and idioms and phrasal verbs.

But then, there’s the big question of you, and: How do you study, and how do you choose what is important for you at this moment? Maybe you’re advanced. Maybe you’re a beginner. Maybe you know this, and maybe you don’t. After today’s lesson and we do our mission, you’ll know exactly what you have to do. Okay? So, we’re going to go to the board in a second, and take a look. What steps should we take in order to learn? By the time you’re done this video, you’ll know exactly… Or you should know where you are, where you need to go, and when you’re going to be done. Ready? Let’s go. E. E is standing here saying: “Where do I start? Grammar, vocabulary, or speaking?” Common, and seems to make sense, I mean, you go to learn a language-right?-you go on a website, they start throwing things at you. You go to a school, they say you need this, this, and this.

But you don’t really know. So, I’m going to give you the tools to decide that. First thing we’re going to do is: What’s the first thing you need? Grammar? No. What? Conversation? No. Vocabulary. What? Well, look. If you can’t say: “bathroom” when you go to a country, you’re going to pee yourself. Okay? “Hungry”, you won’t get food. You don’t need to know everything to get basic information done. And that’s what we should look at first. Basic information for a beginner really is vocabulary. And instead of all the fancy stuff you need, you don’t need much. You need you, and a little bit of time, and to have some fun. Why? I’m going to suggest: For basic communication, get vocabulary. I’m telling you right now if I see you or any English-speaking person sees you, and you see… You say: “Drink. Thirsty.” There’s no grammar, but they’ll go: “Oh, the bar is over there.” If you say: “Washroom. Please”, they’ll go: “Oh, toilet is over there.” They use sentence, you use words.

Sometimes you just touch your belly and go: “Ahh!” They’ll go: “Oh, you want food.” You don’t need all that stuff. People will tell you you need to learn grammar, and this and that. You don’t. And here’s how you get your first vocabulary. Do what you love to do. Play video games. I’ve had… I don’t know how many students play video games, say they learned how to fire, duck, words that we wouldn’t teach them for a while, because they were playing games. Other people come in: “Dah-dah-dah-dah-dah, [sings]”, singing. I go: -“What the hell?” -“I love to sing”, and they sing a song, they sound like they’re just, you know, from this country.

Then they speak very terrible accent. You know what I’m saying, right? [Laughs] But when they sing, it’s like the gods have come down. I mean, literally, you go: “Are you…? You were born here, right?” Cool slang. You know? YOLO, you only live once. Right? ASAP, as soon as possible. When you do these things, you’re learning because you want to learn. You’re not even realising you’re learning, and it’s going to make you want to learn more because… You know, we’ll get to the second one and you’ll understand. But you want to communicate in a much better way. Okay? So, get the meaning of basic words. “Hungry”, “food”, “toilet”, “money”. You know that one, right? You need those things. If you have those things, you can start your adventure in learning English. Okay? And you’re going to do it by doing things you love. Video games, music, cool slang.

Right? Come on. Now we’re making language fun and easy for you, and that’s what we should do, because you’ll learn it faster. All right? And then here’s the bad news: Hard work is on its way, so let’s move over to the intermediate. So if you’re still on vocabulary and you can’t put a sentence together, you’re a beginner. Okay? But at least you’re better than other people. You know words in a foreign language. Cool. Intermediate is when we start, and I think you should introduce grammar. This is when your vocabulary is rich enough that you can say things like: “Need water.” Where? It’s not a sentence, so you kind of sound stupid. I’m saying it right out. You sound stupid. Had many students, brilliant people, sounding like… I called them kids. And I loved them. I thought they were great people, but I would call them kids because they sound like two and five year olds.

“Mommy, water, now.” Understand. Sentence? Not really. Grammar. Some teachers don’t think it’s necessary. It is. It’s like a skeleton in a body. Right? When you’re crawling on the floor, you still need a skeleton, something to hold everything together, but really it’s the muscles and everything else that make you move. But the skeleton is necessary or needed. Those are those bones. Right? These are the bones of the language. You got, you know, your vocabulary, but these hold everything together, that skeleton. Now, when you learn grammar, we do this to be understood.

We said basic communication. To be understood we need grammar. This is sound… And you can sound like you understand. “Oh! I can’t have your girlfriend and all of your money? Oh. I didn’t know that. I understand.” You sound like you understand someone. You can communicate an idea. “I would like to be a millionaire, but I don’t want to work.” See? I’ve communicated: “I am lazy, but I still want to be rich.” Like everyone in North America. Okay, but we’re going to take our vocabulary…

See, this is when you have the vocabulary, you take it, and you put it with some muscle. You put vocabulary and function words. That’s what grammar is. It’s the words that function. It’s the verbs. Right? It’s the pronouns. It’s all these things that go together. It’s like making a hamburger. Okay? You got your meat. Now you need a bun, some lettuce, and everything else. This is your grammar. This makes it good. Okay? So, now you can sound pretty intelligent, not like a child, but some people have great grammar skills and good vocabulary, but-and this is where we go to the advanced-they don’t sound like us.

They still haven’t got it quite together. We know you’re not from here. This is change it all. And this is something that I find interesting. Some students don’t want to do, they think it’s a waste of time. And then I remind them: In your country, are there people who don’t know how to read and write? What do you call them? Some people say (this is a fancy word): “They are illiterate.” I say: “No. They’re stupid.” Because you say: “Hey, read this.” They go: “I cannot read.” You go: “You’re stupid. Didn’t you go to school, stupid?” Don’t be stupid. Learn to read and write. It’s not just for that reason, for your ego that people…

It makes you feel good. It’s also because it teaches you how to think in the language. Huh? Well, when you write something down, you have to remember the author wrote it three years ago. The author is the writer of the book, could be a male, female, or whoever made it. They wrote it three or four years ago, and you’re not there. So when they write about it, they have to think in a way that you would understand it three years later, and not have to ask questions.

Because if you have to say: “I’m confused. What does he mean? Let me call him up. Yo, E, on page 47 you wrote this thing. It’s an awkward phrase. You got a dangling modifier, so I’m not really sure…” It doesn’t work like that. They have to write it properly so you understand it. This is when we become advanced, because you learn logical thought, how we put it together. When we talk about logical thought, we talk about syntax; how the words go together , how things flow, how we think. Every language is different, and the syntax is a bit different. Okay? This will make you think like a native speaker. You have to put the words and even the sentences in a way that makes sense to us. Okay? Remember I said you sound…? Here I meant not stupid. That was it, you don’t sound stupid. Reading and writing makes you sound intelligent, and there’s a difference.

Suddenly, I want to hear what you have to say, because you seem to know what you’re talking about, and you present your ideas in a way I can understand. It also gives you the time to think about the language, so it goes on in your brain, so it knows how to analyze and present the language for us. This is something people skip, because they want to speak, and don’t realize this is a very important part. Reading gives you an understanding of how we’re thinking. You read, you get that. When you write, you have to write in a way that we would understand it. Powerful stuff. And how does it do that? Well, we have three components or three parts. Number one, the grammar. See? Grammar we talked about. Grammar has to be in something you write. Okay? Then it has to be true.

What you say has to make sense to us. It’s logical. I can’t be just: “I am an alien, and I live in the sea, and I have fins and baby-back ribs.” It doesn’t make any sense, even if the sentence is perfectly grammatically correct. It’s like: “This is not true. I will not listen to you.” And then finally we have to connect them, and this is what we talk about syntax, and when we put all of these things together, suddenly you’re speaking and people understand you. Accent or no accent, you are an English speaker. Not quite. Almost. When we put all these three together, and we go to speaking, and you master speaking, which will happen if you take these steps – you will notice you are being understood when you speak. Not five times: “Sorry? Huh? Sorry? Sor-, sorry? Oh, okay. Oh, I’m sorry. No. Sorry?” No. You will speak, you will be understood. When I speak, and some of you think I speak very quickly. And you’re right. My students actually often laugh go: “You don’t speak quickly on those videos.

You speak quickly in real life.” But I like it when people understand me. You will find that you understand me more. You will have more understanding what I say, and English people say. You won’t be guessing what they’re saying. You will actually understand them. Finally, you know that accent that you really don’t like, and you wish you could get rid of? You will. Speaking and using a practice of speaking helps you with proper pronunciation. That’s what helps you with being understood, and actually helps you with understanding other people, because you realize it’s not the absolute pronunciation, but where you put the stresses, what the meaning is. Right? All this comes with language or speaking. You can communicate and have mastered the language. That’s what we talk about by speaking, and I wrote that for a reason. When you are speaking, it’s right or it’s wrong. There’s no time to think about it. That’s what your practice in reading and writing is for.

Okay? So once you can actually speak, you’re done. Congratulations. You’ve learned a new language. Now, look. I want to do… I want to go through a couple of hints to help you out in a second or two, and then I want you to go out there and practice. Figure out where you are. You’ll know, because I’ve already told you. You’re either a beginner and you got to work on your vocabulary. That means most of what I said you didn’t understand. Or you’re intermediate, you got something out of what I’m saying, but you know you can’t express yourself that way. You’re advanced, you’re already smart enough to be writing every day and reading every day.

Or you’re basically fluent and native. Get outta here. Go outside and play. That’s what you should be doing. You ready? Let’s go through those helpful hints. [Snaps] So, we’ve talked about where you might be as a learner; advanced, beginner, or native. Now, I want to give you some more basic hints on acquiring or getting the language. Are you ready? Okay, basic hint number one: 30 minutes a day goes a long way. Whether you’re a beginner, intermediate, or advanced, 30 minutes. If you’re not willing to spend 30 minutes learning, you really don’t want to learn. All right? You need to practice regularly. Give you a good hint or a good example. When you were a baby, you were trying to walk. You would fall down. You would never stand and walk, you kept falling. But every day you tried, and sometimes hours, hours, hours.

Then one day, you started to walk, then you started to run. If you told that baby that 30 minutes a day was a lot of work, you’d be sitting in a chair for the rest of your life. Right? So, 30 minutes a day. Hey, an engVid video is 15. Boo, half your work’s done. Am I a genius? Yeah. Helped you out. Okay, so 30 minutes a day is a good thing to do. Okay? It goes a long way to help you retain or remember the information. Number two: Spend five minutes and review what you did the day before.

I know, it’s 35 minutes, but it’s still not an hour. Okay? So, before, you know, you do your new lesson, think for five minutes: “What did I do yesterday when I did English? Did I…?” Was it…? Were you reading? Did you write? What did you write about? Were there any things you wanted to change in your writing? Okay? So, remember, in your 30 minutes, that can be 30 minutes of writing, 30 minutes of reading, 30 minutes of going through the dictionary looking for words you need, basic words. Right? Or, I don’t know, listening to, like I said, an engVid video.

Watching it twice. The first time, you watch it; second time, make notes about things you want to learn .Right? That’s 30 minutes. Painless. Five minutes review is good, because it’s like eating food. If you take a burger, just put it in your mouth, it’s not as good as when you take it, and chew it and taste it. When you taste it, that’s where the joy comes from. That’s what you should do with language. Just taste it. Play with it a bit. Number three: Imagine yourself in a situation where you have to use the English you’ve learned. That could be part of your 30 minutes. Read for a little while, stop, put the story in your head, close your eyes, and imagine it. If you imagine it, it becomes real. When it becomes real, it becomes useful. Okay? If you just write some grammar down and you write some rules, and you never think about using it, then guess what? You won’t.

So, why don’t we take a couple minutes with our review? Imagine. Okay? “I just learned this new vocabulary. James said something about a pharmacy. Now, imagine I had to go… What did he say I have to say? ‘Can you help me with…?'” Now, imagine asking the… There you go. Next thing you know, you’re in the situation, the words come out of your mouth. Practice. Number four: Set goals. What do you want to do with your English? I know.

“I want to speak English today.” It’s not going to happen. Sorry. Okay? Just like if you want a burger, you have to actually catch a cow, kill a cow, bring it to the store, grind it up or make meat for it, then put it on the barbecue. It doesn’t happen. Right? There’s many steps to it. So, in this case, set goals. Maybe a five-minute conversation with a native speaker. Two-minute, one-minute conversation. Maybe it’s learn turn… Ten words really well. Okay? So you read a book, you pick out ten words you don’t know, go to the dictionary, write it out, then write out sentences with those words. Talk to…

Try and use them in a conversation with somebody so that they become something you’ve digested, that means taken in and you understand. Okay? You understand it completely. Apply for a job. Here’s one. You… It’s the 21st century, bub. Get on the internet. “I would like to work for your company.” Send it out. Right? See what responses you get back. Now, most of them will say: “Hey, your grammar is really bad.” Right? Or you can do a phone interview. Say: “Hey, can we do a Skype interview for this job?” Practice. Just because you’re not living here right now doesn’t mean you can’t put it into practice. And through your mistakes, you can learn, and then go back and use that for your 30 minutes of work. Right? “They didn’t like my accent. It was too strong. Okay, work on pronunciation. They said my grammar skills seemed to be a bit weak.

Okay, work on grammar skills. My vocabulary was limited. I noticed I kept repeating the same thing. Okay, work on vocabulary. Work on synonyms.” You will start making your own lesson plan based on you, not on what some book or some teacher tells you to do. Finally: Travel. I should do, like, say this. Right? Travel. I know. This is not easy. You don’t have money. Right? You don’t have time. But why are you learning it? Everything you really want, you have to do something. We call it a sacrifice. You have to give something to get something you really want. You want to eat, you buy food.

The food’s not free. Right? You want to really use your language, you got to travel. You don’t have to be… Do a big trip. You can find things on the internet where it’s exchange. Somebody’s family comes to your house, you go to their house for two weeks, or something like that. Governments do exchanges where there’s learning programs. Right? Hey, you can go to startup programs. “Hi. I want to learn English. Send me to a country.” Some people, if you give a good enough story: “I live in a farm out in Lithuania.

My family is, you know… Always wanted me to do better with my life, and we know English is important. So, my father’s willing to give up three cows to have me go to Canada.” Put it out there. Somebody will go: “Oh, come on, man. I’ll give you the money.” You know, miracles happen. Things can happen, but you got to do something. Travelling is the one thing that makes you go out there, because you got to do something. You can’t pretend you want to learn, because you have to put your money there. That will be hard, and I admit that. But once you do, if you’re doing all of these things, there’s nothing sweeter than getting off a plane, and saying: “Hi. Can you help me this? I’m looking for a friend of mine”, and the other person going: “Sure, no problem.

Let me take you.” And you’re understood. Right? Cool? I think it’s cool. Anyway, where do I start? You know where to start now, whether you’re a beginner, intermediate, advanced, or you’re native. I’ve given you some helpful hints that you can use starting right this minute. Right? You’re watching one video, so 15 minutes of your time is done. Hit the next one, or go do the quiz.

All right? Cool. Listen, hope I’ve done my part for you. Now it’s time for you to do your part. Study, practice, review. And when you can and if you can, and if you can get the help, travel, see the world. All right? Listen, I got to go. You have a great day. All right? Don’t forget to do the quiz. Where? www, eng, as in English, vid, as in video. I probably did that backwards. Right? engVid. Doesn’t matter. You know. Go to www.engvid.com. Don’t forget to subscribe. It’s somewhere around here. Somewhere. Subscribe. And once again and always, thank you very much for being a part of our family. All right? Have a good one. Ciao.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Vowels & Diphthongs – English Listening & Pronunciation Practice (Part 1)

{“en”:”Hello and welcome everyone. This Minoo at Anglo-Link. In the next two lessons, we’re going to focus on listening and pronunciation. We’re going to work on distinguishing the different vowels and diphthongs in the standard British accent. As I’ve mentioned to you in an earlier video, there are many vowels and diphthongs in the English language. And in order to improve your listening comprehension of native speakers, it’s important that you can distinguish between these different sounds clearly. Of course, as you know, certain sounds are pronounced differently in different accents, like in the American accent, Australian accent, even in different parts of Britain. However, I feel that the standard British accent is a good place to start. And from there, you can begin to learn the variations in the different accents as you come into contact with them. I have divided this lesson into two parts. In the first part, we’re going to contrast short vowels with their long version.

And we’ll do this in minimal pairs. As you know, minimal pairs are words that have the same consonant sounds and by changing the vowel sound we change the meaning. In the second part of this lesson, we’ll look at differences between certain vowels and diphthongs that sound very similar to each other. By the end of this two -part lesson, you will have tuned your ears into the vowels and diphthongs in the standard British accent. This will have improved your listening comprehension of this particular accent and will have also improved your own pronunciation. So, when you’re ready, we can begin with part one.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London