Intonation in Long Sentences – English Pronunciation with JenniferESL

{“en”:”In this lesson, we’ll focus on intonation patterns within longer sentences. Like the one I just said about boots. [title] My model sentences are getting longer now, so I’m using thought groups or intonation groups. Remember what those are? Sometimes our sentences begin with a longer thought. It could be a phrase or a whole clause (with a subject and a verb). We can use low-rise intonation to signal that we’re not done yet.

There’s more information that we’d like to add. There’s more than one intonation pattern we can use in longer sentences. – Either in that first thought group or a middle thought group. So I’ll share a second. It involves dropping our voice and then rising again. Some call it a fall-rise intonation pattern. We can use this fall-rise in many of the same places as the low-rise. You try. Let’s practice the fall-rise intonation pattern. Repeat after me. So what’s the difference between the low-rise and and the fall-rise? I don’t believe there’s a significant difference. Both patterns end with a rise, and that signals incompletion. You’re not done with your thought.

There’s more coming. Here’s where I think there could be a difference. Stating lists. Listen and compare. I have one pair of sneakers, a few pairs of boots, two pairs of sandals, and…several pairs of dress shoes. I have one pair of sneakers, a few pairs of boots, two pairs of sandals, and several pairs of dress shoes. When I used low-rise intonation the first time, I needed time to think. My statement sounded more hesitant, less certain. The second time I used fall-rise intonation. It sounded more certain. Perhaps even more authoritative. See if you can understand the difference when I count. First, I’ll use a low-rise.

1…2…3…4…5. Now I’ll try a fall-rise. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. Sounds more certain. I can make it even more certain and perhaps authoritative if I use that “angry parent” voice. 1, 2, 3, 4… Do you see how the meaning…and the expression changes? We can even put these two intonation patterns together in the same sentence. I did this at the beginning of the video when I said, …and then I add on. We might also use a fall-rise when we need to pause because we’re hesitating to add on. To finish our thought. We know what we’re going to say, but perhaps what we’re going to say is surprising or disappointing in some way. You’ll hear statements like, You could try, but it may not work. They’re good, but expensive. Let’s put everything together. We’ll read a short text. I’ll mark the thought groups, show the focus words, and also show where we rise and fall. If you want, I’ll tell you where I got these leather boots. Do you want to know? I got them in Texas. That’s all for now. Thanks for watching and happy studies.. “}

As found on Youtube

Hypnotherapy in Brighton

Steps to Learning English: Where should you start?

{“en”:”[Singing] Hi. James. Greer. James Greer. From engVid. [Laughs]. Not Bond, and I know you think I was going to say Bond. I know. But listen, Bond always has an important mission he’s got to do, right? 007. And so do I. Today we have a mission. We’re going to learn how to study English. I know in many places, many websites, they tell you, and to teach you grammar and idioms and phrasal verbs.

But then, there’s the big question of you, and: How do you study, and how do you choose what is important for you at this moment? Maybe you’re advanced. Maybe you’re a beginner. Maybe you know this, and maybe you don’t. After today’s lesson and we do our mission, you’ll know exactly what you have to do. Okay? So, we’re going to go to the board in a second, and take a look. What steps should we take in order to learn? By the time you’re done this video, you’ll know exactly… Or you should know where you are, where you need to go, and when you’re going to be done. Ready? Let’s go. E. E is standing here saying: “Where do I start? Grammar, vocabulary, or speaking?” Common, and seems to make sense, I mean, you go to learn a language-right?-you go on a website, they start throwing things at you. You go to a school, they say you need this, this, and this.

But you don’t really know. So, I’m going to give you the tools to decide that. First thing we’re going to do is: What’s the first thing you need? Grammar? No. What? Conversation? No. Vocabulary. What? Well, look. If you can’t say: “bathroom” when you go to a country, you’re going to pee yourself. Okay? “Hungry”, you won’t get food. You don’t need to know everything to get basic information done. And that’s what we should look at first. Basic information for a beginner really is vocabulary. And instead of all the fancy stuff you need, you don’t need much. You need you, and a little bit of time, and to have some fun. Why? I’m going to suggest: For basic communication, get vocabulary. I’m telling you right now if I see you or any English-speaking person sees you, and you see… You say: “Drink. Thirsty.” There’s no grammar, but they’ll go: “Oh, the bar is over there.” If you say: “Washroom. Please”, they’ll go: “Oh, toilet is over there.” They use sentence, you use words.

Sometimes you just touch your belly and go: “Ahh!” They’ll go: “Oh, you want food.” You don’t need all that stuff. People will tell you you need to learn grammar, and this and that. You don’t. And here’s how you get your first vocabulary. Do what you love to do. Play video games. I’ve had… I don’t know how many students play video games, say they learned how to fire, duck, words that we wouldn’t teach them for a while, because they were playing games. Other people come in: “Dah-dah-dah-dah-dah, [sings]”, singing. I go: -“What the hell?” -“I love to sing”, and they sing a song, they sound like they’re just, you know, from this country.

Then they speak very terrible accent. You know what I’m saying, right? [Laughs] But when they sing, it’s like the gods have come down. I mean, literally, you go: “Are you…? You were born here, right?” Cool slang. You know? YOLO, you only live once. Right? ASAP, as soon as possible. When you do these things, you’re learning because you want to learn. You’re not even realising you’re learning, and it’s going to make you want to learn more because… You know, we’ll get to the second one and you’ll understand. But you want to communicate in a much better way. Okay? So, get the meaning of basic words. “Hungry”, “food”, “toilet”, “money”. You know that one, right? You need those things. If you have those things, you can start your adventure in learning English. Okay? And you’re going to do it by doing things you love. Video games, music, cool slang.

Right? Come on. Now we’re making language fun and easy for you, and that’s what we should do, because you’ll learn it faster. All right? And then here’s the bad news: Hard work is on its way, so let’s move over to the intermediate. So if you’re still on vocabulary and you can’t put a sentence together, you’re a beginner. Okay? But at least you’re better than other people. You know words in a foreign language. Cool. Intermediate is when we start, and I think you should introduce grammar. This is when your vocabulary is rich enough that you can say things like: “Need water.” Where? It’s not a sentence, so you kind of sound stupid. I’m saying it right out. You sound stupid. Had many students, brilliant people, sounding like… I called them kids. And I loved them. I thought they were great people, but I would call them kids because they sound like two and five year olds.

“Mommy, water, now.” Understand. Sentence? Not really. Grammar. Some teachers don’t think it’s necessary. It is. It’s like a skeleton in a body. Right? When you’re crawling on the floor, you still need a skeleton, something to hold everything together, but really it’s the muscles and everything else that make you move. But the skeleton is necessary or needed. Those are those bones. Right? These are the bones of the language. You got, you know, your vocabulary, but these hold everything together, that skeleton. Now, when you learn grammar, we do this to be understood.

We said basic communication. To be understood we need grammar. This is sound… And you can sound like you understand. “Oh! I can’t have your girlfriend and all of your money? Oh. I didn’t know that. I understand.” You sound like you understand someone. You can communicate an idea. “I would like to be a millionaire, but I don’t want to work.” See? I’ve communicated: “I am lazy, but I still want to be rich.” Like everyone in North America. Okay, but we’re going to take our vocabulary…

See, this is when you have the vocabulary, you take it, and you put it with some muscle. You put vocabulary and function words. That’s what grammar is. It’s the words that function. It’s the verbs. Right? It’s the pronouns. It’s all these things that go together. It’s like making a hamburger. Okay? You got your meat. Now you need a bun, some lettuce, and everything else. This is your grammar. This makes it good. Okay? So, now you can sound pretty intelligent, not like a child, but some people have great grammar skills and good vocabulary, but-and this is where we go to the advanced-they don’t sound like us.

They still haven’t got it quite together. We know you’re not from here. This is change it all. And this is something that I find interesting. Some students don’t want to do, they think it’s a waste of time. And then I remind them: In your country, are there people who don’t know how to read and write? What do you call them? Some people say (this is a fancy word): “They are illiterate.” I say: “No. They’re stupid.” Because you say: “Hey, read this.” They go: “I cannot read.” You go: “You’re stupid. Didn’t you go to school, stupid?” Don’t be stupid. Learn to read and write. It’s not just for that reason, for your ego that people…

It makes you feel good. It’s also because it teaches you how to think in the language. Huh? Well, when you write something down, you have to remember the author wrote it three years ago. The author is the writer of the book, could be a male, female, or whoever made it. They wrote it three or four years ago, and you’re not there. So when they write about it, they have to think in a way that you would understand it three years later, and not have to ask questions.

Because if you have to say: “I’m confused. What does he mean? Let me call him up. Yo, E, on page 47 you wrote this thing. It’s an awkward phrase. You got a dangling modifier, so I’m not really sure…” It doesn’t work like that. They have to write it properly so you understand it. This is when we become advanced, because you learn logical thought, how we put it together. When we talk about logical thought, we talk about syntax; how the words go together , how things flow, how we think. Every language is different, and the syntax is a bit different. Okay? This will make you think like a native speaker. You have to put the words and even the sentences in a way that makes sense to us. Okay? Remember I said you sound…? Here I meant not stupid. That was it, you don’t sound stupid. Reading and writing makes you sound intelligent, and there’s a difference.

Suddenly, I want to hear what you have to say, because you seem to know what you’re talking about, and you present your ideas in a way I can understand. It also gives you the time to think about the language, so it goes on in your brain, so it knows how to analyze and present the language for us. This is something people skip, because they want to speak, and don’t realize this is a very important part. Reading gives you an understanding of how we’re thinking. You read, you get that. When you write, you have to write in a way that we would understand it. Powerful stuff. And how does it do that? Well, we have three components or three parts. Number one, the grammar. See? Grammar we talked about. Grammar has to be in something you write. Okay? Then it has to be true.

What you say has to make sense to us. It’s logical. I can’t be just: “I am an alien, and I live in the sea, and I have fins and baby-back ribs.” It doesn’t make any sense, even if the sentence is perfectly grammatically correct. It’s like: “This is not true. I will not listen to you.” And then finally we have to connect them, and this is what we talk about syntax, and when we put all of these things together, suddenly you’re speaking and people understand you. Accent or no accent, you are an English speaker. Not quite. Almost. When we put all these three together, and we go to speaking, and you master speaking, which will happen if you take these steps – you will notice you are being understood when you speak. Not five times: “Sorry? Huh? Sorry? Sor-, sorry? Oh, okay. Oh, I’m sorry. No. Sorry?” No. You will speak, you will be understood. When I speak, and some of you think I speak very quickly. And you’re right. My students actually often laugh go: “You don’t speak quickly on those videos.

You speak quickly in real life.” But I like it when people understand me. You will find that you understand me more. You will have more understanding what I say, and English people say. You won’t be guessing what they’re saying. You will actually understand them. Finally, you know that accent that you really don’t like, and you wish you could get rid of? You will. Speaking and using a practice of speaking helps you with proper pronunciation. That’s what helps you with being understood, and actually helps you with understanding other people, because you realize it’s not the absolute pronunciation, but where you put the stresses, what the meaning is. Right? All this comes with language or speaking. You can communicate and have mastered the language. That’s what we talk about by speaking, and I wrote that for a reason. When you are speaking, it’s right or it’s wrong. There’s no time to think about it. That’s what your practice in reading and writing is for.

Okay? So once you can actually speak, you’re done. Congratulations. You’ve learned a new language. Now, look. I want to do… I want to go through a couple of hints to help you out in a second or two, and then I want you to go out there and practice. Figure out where you are. You’ll know, because I’ve already told you. You’re either a beginner and you got to work on your vocabulary. That means most of what I said you didn’t understand. Or you’re intermediate, you got something out of what I’m saying, but you know you can’t express yourself that way. You’re advanced, you’re already smart enough to be writing every day and reading every day.

Or you’re basically fluent and native. Get outta here. Go outside and play. That’s what you should be doing. You ready? Let’s go through those helpful hints. [Snaps] So, we’ve talked about where you might be as a learner; advanced, beginner, or native. Now, I want to give you some more basic hints on acquiring or getting the language. Are you ready? Okay, basic hint number one: 30 minutes a day goes a long way. Whether you’re a beginner, intermediate, or advanced, 30 minutes. If you’re not willing to spend 30 minutes learning, you really don’t want to learn. All right? You need to practice regularly. Give you a good hint or a good example. When you were a baby, you were trying to walk. You would fall down. You would never stand and walk, you kept falling. But every day you tried, and sometimes hours, hours, hours.

Then one day, you started to walk, then you started to run. If you told that baby that 30 minutes a day was a lot of work, you’d be sitting in a chair for the rest of your life. Right? So, 30 minutes a day. Hey, an engVid video is 15. Boo, half your work’s done. Am I a genius? Yeah. Helped you out. Okay, so 30 minutes a day is a good thing to do. Okay? It goes a long way to help you retain or remember the information. Number two: Spend five minutes and review what you did the day before.

I know, it’s 35 minutes, but it’s still not an hour. Okay? So, before, you know, you do your new lesson, think for five minutes: “What did I do yesterday when I did English? Did I…?” Was it…? Were you reading? Did you write? What did you write about? Were there any things you wanted to change in your writing? Okay? So, remember, in your 30 minutes, that can be 30 minutes of writing, 30 minutes of reading, 30 minutes of going through the dictionary looking for words you need, basic words. Right? Or, I don’t know, listening to, like I said, an engVid video.

Watching it twice. The first time, you watch it; second time, make notes about things you want to learn .Right? That’s 30 minutes. Painless. Five minutes review is good, because it’s like eating food. If you take a burger, just put it in your mouth, it’s not as good as when you take it, and chew it and taste it. When you taste it, that’s where the joy comes from. That’s what you should do with language. Just taste it. Play with it a bit. Number three: Imagine yourself in a situation where you have to use the English you’ve learned. That could be part of your 30 minutes. Read for a little while, stop, put the story in your head, close your eyes, and imagine it. If you imagine it, it becomes real. When it becomes real, it becomes useful. Okay? If you just write some grammar down and you write some rules, and you never think about using it, then guess what? You won’t.

So, why don’t we take a couple minutes with our review? Imagine. Okay? “I just learned this new vocabulary. James said something about a pharmacy. Now, imagine I had to go… What did he say I have to say? ‘Can you help me with…?'” Now, imagine asking the… There you go. Next thing you know, you’re in the situation, the words come out of your mouth. Practice. Number four: Set goals. What do you want to do with your English? I know.

“I want to speak English today.” It’s not going to happen. Sorry. Okay? Just like if you want a burger, you have to actually catch a cow, kill a cow, bring it to the store, grind it up or make meat for it, then put it on the barbecue. It doesn’t happen. Right? There’s many steps to it. So, in this case, set goals. Maybe a five-minute conversation with a native speaker. Two-minute, one-minute conversation. Maybe it’s learn turn… Ten words really well. Okay? So you read a book, you pick out ten words you don’t know, go to the dictionary, write it out, then write out sentences with those words. Talk to…

Try and use them in a conversation with somebody so that they become something you’ve digested, that means taken in and you understand. Okay? You understand it completely. Apply for a job. Here’s one. You… It’s the 21st century, bub. Get on the internet. “I would like to work for your company.” Send it out. Right? See what responses you get back. Now, most of them will say: “Hey, your grammar is really bad.” Right? Or you can do a phone interview. Say: “Hey, can we do a Skype interview for this job?” Practice. Just because you’re not living here right now doesn’t mean you can’t put it into practice. And through your mistakes, you can learn, and then go back and use that for your 30 minutes of work. Right? “They didn’t like my accent. It was too strong. Okay, work on pronunciation. They said my grammar skills seemed to be a bit weak.

Okay, work on grammar skills. My vocabulary was limited. I noticed I kept repeating the same thing. Okay, work on vocabulary. Work on synonyms.” You will start making your own lesson plan based on you, not on what some book or some teacher tells you to do. Finally: Travel. I should do, like, say this. Right? Travel. I know. This is not easy. You don’t have money. Right? You don’t have time. But why are you learning it? Everything you really want, you have to do something. We call it a sacrifice. You have to give something to get something you really want. You want to eat, you buy food.

The food’s not free. Right? You want to really use your language, you got to travel. You don’t have to be… Do a big trip. You can find things on the internet where it’s exchange. Somebody’s family comes to your house, you go to their house for two weeks, or something like that. Governments do exchanges where there’s learning programs. Right? Hey, you can go to startup programs. “Hi. I want to learn English. Send me to a country.” Some people, if you give a good enough story: “I live in a farm out in Lithuania.

My family is, you know… Always wanted me to do better with my life, and we know English is important. So, my father’s willing to give up three cows to have me go to Canada.” Put it out there. Somebody will go: “Oh, come on, man. I’ll give you the money.” You know, miracles happen. Things can happen, but you got to do something. Travelling is the one thing that makes you go out there, because you got to do something. You can’t pretend you want to learn, because you have to put your money there. That will be hard, and I admit that. But once you do, if you’re doing all of these things, there’s nothing sweeter than getting off a plane, and saying: “Hi. Can you help me this? I’m looking for a friend of mine”, and the other person going: “Sure, no problem.

Let me take you.” And you’re understood. Right? Cool? I think it’s cool. Anyway, where do I start? You know where to start now, whether you’re a beginner, intermediate, advanced, or you’re native. I’ve given you some helpful hints that you can use starting right this minute. Right? You’re watching one video, so 15 minutes of your time is done. Hit the next one, or go do the quiz.

All right? Cool. Listen, hope I’ve done my part for you. Now it’s time for you to do your part. Study, practice, review. And when you can and if you can, and if you can get the help, travel, see the world. All right? Listen, I got to go. You have a great day. All right? Don’t forget to do the quiz. Where? www, eng, as in English, vid, as in video. I probably did that backwards. Right? engVid. Doesn’t matter. You know. Go to www.engvid.com. Don’t forget to subscribe. It’s somewhere around here. Somewhere. Subscribe. And once again and always, thank you very much for being a part of our family. All right? Have a good one. Ciao.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

8 Ways to Speak English with an American Accent

{“en”:”Hey, Naturals. What’s going on? It’s your favorite American English teacher Gabby here to help you today with eight Ways that you and anyone can sound more like a North American English Speaker now I know this is just the lesson that you’ve been waiting for I’m going to tell you eight Tricks and secrets that you probably didn’t learn in your normal Traditional English classroom We’re going to really focus on how to make your pronunciation and your accent more American like now I’m not saying that everyone should speak like an American But hey if you want to know how to do that I’m going to explain exactly how so instead of just trying to imitate or copy you’re going to learn the specific points so that you can focus on what it means to speak like an American if You’d like to get a notification for when I make a new English lesson video and I’m putting out a lot of new ones these days make sure that you’re subscribed to Go Natural English here on YouTube by clicking on the big red Subscribe button below It would be my honor to have you join our awesome community of Go Natural English learners here on YouTube and make sure you visit gonaturalenglish.com Where I post the blog lesson for each video to help you learn more Now let’s begin with the 8 ways that you can sound more like an American English speaker Number one, let’s talk about syllables every word that has at least Two syllables or more has a stressed syllable and a weak syllable, so let’s just take the word American We have 3 syllables, right? American that’s four syllables So when we have more than two syllables one is going to be stressed when which syllable is stressed in American Can you hear it? American so it’s the second syllable right so in order to speak more like an American make sure that you really stretch that stressed syllable out make it longer make it louder make it higher say American with me now American and to balance this out the syllables that are not stressed are probably going to sound like a Schwa sound which is up that sound you make of someone punch of you in your gut you go Oh American Can you hear that? Uh American.

Very Good so American English Really stresses the stressed syllable and makes the other syllables very weak number two learn Connected speech. Oh, it’s so easy to say but yet there are so many different rules in connected speech, so let me quickly share several the most important with you in American English Especially whenever you find a t between two vowel sounds it’s going to be a d. We don’t drink water We drink water We don’t put butter on our toast we put butter on our toast okay? so t between two vowels equals a d a T between an N, and a vowel gets removed International not International International dentist not dentist, but dentist when you have an N then a T then a vowel sometimes it becomes a glottal stop like Mountain or Or a vowel than a double t And a vowel like button or cotton when you have a t or a d between two Consonants it often gets removed old man, not old man old man most famous not most Famous, but most famous we blend and link sounds together when one word ends with a consonant and the next begins with a vowel or when the next word begins with the same consonant as the word before it ands With that was a big jumbled mess We blend and link sounds together from one word to the next for example social life becomes social life We also make two words seem as though They were one when we blend sounds together like this afternoon this afternoon Now I know I’m going really fast because I’ve made Specific lessons about most of these points in other video lessons on the go natural English channel So make sure to check those out if you’d like a more detailed explanation of each point You can click up here for one of my best lessons on linking and connected speech Assimilation is huge in American English did you becomes didja and don’t you becomes dontcha? intrusion where we insert a new sound for example between he and Asked we insert the /j/ sound he asked or do and if we insert a /w/ sound do it he asked to do it and in some parts of the united states you have an R intrusion between vowels – like for example between Media and attention media attention Finally let me tell you about Elision where we omit a sound for example the t in the word kept when it comes before going kept going Number three in American English the R is so important and so frustrating for many English learners because it can be quite different than in your native language be aware of r-colored vowels for example in the word word Or why is it not ward it’s her word or for example World why is it not World its world.

So that is an r-colored vowel. We’re about and before an R and it becomes err so a lot of American English vowels will become this sound that sounds like a pirate talking so get out your pirate hooks and go err When you make this sound or not because that’s kind of weird when we have an r at the end of the word we usually pronounce it strongly I say usually because some people like in new England will cut that R off for example I parked my car Well, that’s a Boston accent and yes, I have lived in Boston, but I never adopted that accent. I would say I park my car so but watch out for Different ways of using the R if you really want to sound American you need some American phrases like instead of asking How are you you can ask.

What’s up or instead of saying That’s nice, or that’s good You could say that’s cool. Or that’s awesome in general when you speak English try to speak a little bit louder verbs use a ton of phrasal verbs we rarely use a normal kind of academic verb in everyday speech in conversation so instead of the verb to exit or to leave say to get out or instead of saying to arrive say to Get in or instead of saying to start or to begin you could say get going Get going could also mean to leave so phrasal verbs can be kind of confusing but they’re really key to use a lot of them if you want to sound like an American Native English speaker also start creating verbs out of nouns Like Google Google’s a noun, but we say let’s google it google that question or friend friend is a noun Right well I can friend you on Facebook So friend is now a verb so just take any noun you want and make it into a verb and you’ll sound more American and finally Vocabulary so I did suggest to you some very American phrases like awesome, and what’s up? But if you want to know quickly a few words that are different in American English as opposed to British English, we Say fall not autumn.

We say faucet not tap We say apartment not flat elevator. Not lift diaper not nappy TV not telly and Candy not sweets. Oh, and one more that always catches me off guard We say take out not take away when we go to a restaurant, and we want to take the food home So I think that you are properly prepared now to sound really American like a native speaker So if you have questions about any of these points, I know I went really fast leave a comment Make sure to subscribe so that you can see you my answers to Your questions if I make a video to answer them and make sure to visit me at gonaturalenglish.com For more learning, and that’s where you can get the English Fluency Formula ebook that I wrote for you as well Thank you so much for watching and I’ll see you in another video lesson soon.

Bye for now. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

Day 13 – Contractions – Understanding Fast Speech in English

{“en”:”Hi. It’s Day 13. I’m sure you know that in English we can’t have double negatives. So it’s wrong to say, “I don’t see nobody.” We should say, “I don’t see anybody.” In fast speech, we can have relaxed sounds, but the grammar should still remain standard. English with Jennifer You heard me use some common contractions: I’m / can’t / it’s Contractions are definitely used in fast speech, so be prepared to hear all the usual ones. But you’ll also need to get used to hearing common contractions that we just say, but don’t write. For example, shorter forms with the verb ARE. Look at two examples of standard contractions used in both spoken and written English. they’re / aren’t Now look at two examples of contractions often used in spoken English. So you won’t find these forms in most dictionaries. “What are” and “there are” can both contract. How do these forms sound? I’ll tell you.

In fast speech ARE can sound like “er.” There are some rules. What are the rules? Here are some tips. Look at these examples. Each one has the verb ARE. As I read them fast, listen closely, and you’ll hear me change ARE to a very weak ‘RE. Listen closely. I’ll say a sentence or phrase. You try to understand. That’s all for now. Thanks for watching and happy studies.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in London

2 fun new ways to learn English vocabulary

{“en”:”Yeah, that was fun. I’m looking forward to hearing that from you later. Hi. James from engVid. In this video what I would like to do is help you work on vocabulary. I want to make it fun, because when things are fun, you work harder and you learn more. And today’s lesson, I’m going to teach you two ways to not only just remember vocabulary, but learn how to use vocabulary in a way that we use it, and you will really understand it, and… Heck, it’s fun. You’re just going to have fun doing it. I’m sure you will. All right? It’s a little bit creative. So, let’s go to the board. Simple lesson. Here we go. Two ways to have fun with language. Not just language, but vocabulary. Ways that you may not be studying in class, we’re going to do here today.

The first one I want to talk to you about is fill in the gap. Huh? “A gap” means a space, there’s a space between something. So, here’s my hands, in between my hands is a gap. Okay? You have a gap between your eyes. One eye, one eye, space. In this case, you see I’ve got this: “tree __________ chair”. Now, fill in the gap doesn’t mean just one word. It’s a couple of ways you can do this. In this particular game, we’re going to take two vocabulary words, “tree”, and take another one, “chair”, and they’re kind of a little obvious to make it easy for you, but what I want you to do is one of two things. The first thing we can do is use x words. What I mean by that is you could say: “I want to use five words, and I want to go from ‘tree’ to ‘chair’.” Or: “I want to use three words from ‘tree’ to ‘chair'” or two. Huh? Well, okay. How do I get from “tree”? Okay. “Tree”, “cut”. You cut the tree down, right? “Lumber”. Lumber you make into wood you can use.

Let’s see. “Carpenter”. Find a carpenter. “Craft”. “Craft” means make. You’re like: “What?” These… All these words… And then I can say: “Furniture”. Okay? Okay, furniture. “Chair”, so if I have a tree, I cut it down and make it into lumber, I take it to a carpenter, he crafts it into a chair. Five words from A to B. So, one game is tell yourself: “I want to go from five… One word to another word, and I want five words to get there.” And you can challenge yourself; maybe go from three words. Right? Or make 10 words. You can use it to describe something. How many words you can use to describe a certain thing. Right? “I have this word, and I want to go to this word. How many words does it take me to get there?” What this does is it teaches you relationship between words, and that also can teach you nouns and verbs, and how they function together.

Or, we say “syntax”, right? So, start at A, say: “I want to use five words to get there.” This is a great word to do with a friend. You can say: “Okay, we’re going to do ‘tree’ and ‘chair’, you need to do five words that make sense to go from ‘tree’ to ‘chair'”, and put a clock on for five minutes. You go, and she goes, you write together and see what words you get. Compare, check them out. “Why did you choose this, and why does this word…? What does this word mean?” Right? So, now, you’re not just writing words in a book and saying: “This word means this.” You’re: “What does it mean? How do I use it? How would other people use it? How would other people think?” Right? Yeah.

See? That’s fun by yourself or with a friend. Okay, listen, the second way to play this game is: How many words to the answer? What? Well, we can pick up two random words, two, like… I have “chair”… “Tree” and “chair”, we could have put “chair” and “moon”. Now the game gets a little bit more interesting. Right? “Chair” and “moon”.

How many words does it get me to go from “chair” to “moon”? Now, you might say: “That’s impossible. They have nothing to do with each other.” I could say, “Listen, the chair in my living room”-“living room” is a noun-“sits”-which is a verb -“close to the big bay window where I can see the moon at night.” How many words did it take me to get from “chair” to “moon”? So, it’s playing with words, being creative.

“Chair” and “moon” have nothing to do with each other, but I used nouns and verbs to go from this place to this place, and actually created a sentence as well. Now, you can, as I said, make it more of a challenge. Do the same thing with a friend. How many words, just random words, how many words does it take? And you can time each other to see who gets there first. And the sentence must make sense. Cool? All right? Once again, you’re going to learn syntax and meaning; you have to put the words in the right order, you can’t just throw words in there. And when I say “meaning”, it has to have sense that it goes from here to here that someone would understand it and, you know, agree with it.

That’s one game. The second game I like a lot, and I’m going to embarrass myself in about four minutes, two minutes, whatever. I hope you like this one, too. I like this one because what you do is if you’re studying particular vocabulary… We have in engVid, vocabulary about travel, the kitchen, the law, all sorts of ones you can go to. Go there, and there’s usually about 10 words. Take those 10 words. Okay? And then you’re going to write a poem. Poem. Well, poems are literary devices. They are types of… They’re forms of writing that don’t have to follow the normal ways of writing. In Japan, they have what’s called a Haiku. We have rhyming poetry, like… I can’t thinking anything off the right… Top of my head. Simple Simon metapimon. No, that’s not a rhyme. But rhyme, words that go together like “time”, “rhyme”, “bime”, you’d have to have all these words kind of go together. Okay? So, poetry could be to express a… Or express a thought or an idea, but it doesn’t have to be written as a specific paragraph. Right? It could be, as I said, a Haiku is in Japanese poetry, rhyming poetry, sometimes abstract poetry.

This is a fun one because in this one you’re going to write a poem, and you might not have done that in your current reading-… Writing assignments. You’re writing paragraphs for essays and things, but we want to show you the connection with words. So, what I want you to do is write a poem using five or maybe even 10 words. Try not to do more, because you’re learning how to write right now. Okay? Use on vocabulary… “One” vocabulary word, because “on” is a preposition.

One vocabulary word on each line, but have the poem’s lines be connected by the ideas in the words, which means you can’t just randomly write words and funny sentences; they’ve got to be connected. This shows your mastery of the language. And that’s why I said this is a good one. It’s fun and you’re showing your mastery. In this case, I’ve got: “rain”, “down”, “heaven”, “hard”, “thirst”. Random words. Right? Let me clear my throat. You didn’t know it, but it’s James’ Beatnik Poetry Cafu00e9. I’m about to give you some lines. Rain comes down hard from heaven, crashing into the ground, making the heart go soft, quenching the thirst of the earth, removing the dirt, revealing the hidden beauty. Thank you. Thank you, thank you, thank you. Okay, so I took these words, and if you noticed, there’s a very specific thing.

This poem I did the first line one word, on the second line I put two words, on the third line I put three words, on the fourth and fifth… You can see these numbers. These were the words I used. Each of them makes sense in the poem. When you hear it, you’re like: “Oh, yeah, that makes sense.” “Heaven” is above, “rain” comes down. Right? “Heaven”, above, yeah. “Hard”, well, when water hits the ground, the ground goes soft. And if you’re “thirsty”, it means you need a drink, if the dry is ground it’s thirsty, so it wants water to drink. Right? I’m showing you I understand the language enough to put these words together. Because I put one word, two words, three words, I also have to use other words I learned. So, you can take this from a particular lesson-right?-because “rain” would be “water” and “thirst”. Probably a lesson on water. Right? Yeah. You could do that for travelling. You know? Sky drawing me up… No, drawing me up into… See? I’m just making it up, but you get the point. You take them, you put them together. And even that last sentence, I’m like: “That wasn’t cool.

I have to… Don’t want to look like a fool, so I’ll have to retool.” Right? So, if you’re smiling, having fun, saying: “Wow. I’m, like, playing with the language.” You’ll show that you understand it, you’ll have a beautiful product that you can show another person, saying: “Look at my English.” And they may be impressed when you explain the rules you were following, like: one words, two words, three words, and how you learned to express yourself and have a deep understanding.

Right? So, look, I hope you’ve enjoyed these two lessons. You can see I did, because I did a little poem for you, using this exact lesson. E’s smiling, because he’s like: “Wow, this is fun.” I’m sure this was fun for you. Give it a try. Get out your vocabulary words, or go watch another engVid lesson. Right? And then take out some vocabulary words, because they do go together, and use them. Make a couple poems, have some fun with it. All right? Anyway, where are you going to find these words? Well, I want you to go to www.eng as in English, vid as in video.com (www.engvid.com), where you can play, have fun, and experiment.

All right? That’s what it’s about, and that’s how you learn best. Anyway, once again, I just wanted to say thank you guys for watching the channel, look forward to all your comments, and the fact that you go do those quizzes. And before I go, I really want you to subscribe, so somewhere around here, or even down here, there’s a subscribe button. Okay? Subscribe, and you’ll get the newest stuff from myself and engVid. Right? Have a good one. See ya later. Remember: Rain comes down hard.. “}

As found on Youtube

Global London College

Learn English: “How come?”

Hello. My name is Emma, and in today’s video I am going to teach you a very important expression for conversation. That expression is: “How come?” It’s a very popular expression you may see in movies, on TV, or in conversation with English speakers. But it’s a very good one to know because we do use it a lot. So, what does “How come?” mean? Okay, well, first I have a question for you. I have here two sentences. “Why did you miss your plane?” and “How come you missed your plane?” What is the difference in meaning between these two sentences? Maybe you already know. Okay? So take a guess. The difference in meaning is actually they mean the same thing. “How come?” is another way to say “Why?”. It’s just a little bit more informal. Okay? So if you’re writing, you’re going to use “Why?”, but if you’re speaking you can use both.

Okay? “How come?” is informal, it’s an informal way to say “Why?” And so, by informal, I mean you use it with your friends, with, you know, people you’re talking to on the street, but you wouldn’t use it in an essay. Okay? Or for school. Okay, so: “How come?” means: “Why?” So, when we’re asking: “How come?” what we’re asking about is… we want to know why something happened or the reasons why something happened. Okay? So, for example: “How come you missed your plane?” You know, a reason might be: “Oh, I was late getting to the airport” or “I slept in.” Okay? So these would be the answers to a question like: “How come?” So, a lot of the time, teachers will ask this question. “You were late for class today. How come?” That means the teacher wants to know why you were late for class. So now let’s look at the grammar of “How come?” and how we can use it in a sentence. Okay, so again, “How come?” is an informal way to say: “Why?” So, we often use it in conversation.

Now let’s look at the grammar of “How come?” and how we make a sentence with “How come?” So, I have here: “How come”, which is at the beginning, and then we have plus the subject. A subject is… It can be: “I”, “you”, “he”, “she”, “they”, “we”, or it can also be a thing, a place, or a person, but it’s the doer of a sentence. Then we have the verb. So, for example: “play”, “take”, “listen”, “sing”, “eat”, these are all verbs. And then finally we have an object, which comes after the verb in regular English sentences and usually those can be people, they can be places, they can be things, so these are the objects.

If this is confusing, let’s look at some examples, maybe that will help. So, for example: “How come you”-is the subject-“take”-is the verb, and the object is-“the bus”? “How come you take the bus?” This means the same thing as: “Why do you take the bus?” So, here I actually have this written: “Why do you take the bus?” And you’ll actually notice “How come” is easier in terms of grammar than “Why”. If you look here: “Why do you take the bus?” you have this word, here: “do”. Okay? In other sentences we say: “Why does he” or “Why didn’t he”, but there’s always something like: “do”, “does”, “did”, “didn’t” here with “Why”.

And a lot of students forget to put this here. A lot of students will say: “Why you take the bus?” But this is not correct English. For “Why” we always need something here. Now, the nice thing about “How come” is you don’t need this. Okay? If you look at “How come”, if you can make an English sentence: “you take the bus”, you can change this into “Why” just by adding “How come”. So, the structure of this is just like a regular English sentence. We have the subject, the verb, and the object, and then we just add “How come” at the front of it. So let’s look at another example: “How come Toronto isn’t the capital of Canada?” So, again, we have: “How come”, we have “Toronto” which is the subject, we have “isn’t” which is the verb, and we have “the capital”, which is the object.

So, if you want to make a regular sentence, I would just say: “Toronto isn’t the capital”, we can just add “How come” to this, and then it becomes a question, meaning: “Why isn’t Toronto the capital?” “How come John didn’t come?” Okay? So here we have “How come” at the beginning, “John” which is the subject, and “didn’t come”, because it’s negative form we have “didn’t” here, so this is the past, past tense. “Didn’t come” is the verb. Okay? This sentence doesn’t have an object. Not all sentences in English need objects. The main thing is that you have a subject and a verb. Okay, so that might be a little confusing for you.

Point here is: “How come” is easier than “Why” because all you need to do is make a basic sentence, and you add “How come” to the front of it. Okay? One last thing I wanted to say about “How come”, you can also use “How come?” just on its own. Okay? Here I showed you how to make “How come”, you know, combined with a sentence. You can also just use it, like, you know: “How come” and a question mark. So, for example, imagine we’re having a conversation and I say to you: “Oh, John didn’t come today.” You might be wondering: “Oh, why didn’t John come?” So you can just say to me: “How come?” which means: “Why didn’t John come?” Okay? Or, you know: -“English is a great language.” -“How come?” Again, this just means: “Why?” So it’s a very easy thing to use, and I really, really recommend you start using this in your English because it will make you sound more like a native speaker, and it will improve your conversation or your conversational English. So, I invite you to come subscribe to my YouTube channel. There, you can find a lot of different videos on all sorts of different things English, including pronunciation, grammar, IELTS, vocabulary.

There’re so many different resources we have. I also invite you to check out our website at www.engvid.com. There, you can actually do some practice on this video and everything you learned today. We have a quiz there, and I highly, highly recommend you take our quiz. It’s very good to practice what you learn so you can remember it. Okay? You can also practice this maybe with a friend, or if you’re taking English classes why not try using this inside one of your classes with your teacher? So, until next time, thank you for watching and take care..

As found on Youtube

Say what you mean! Simple English words that learners often say incorrectly

Hi there. My name is Emma, and in today’s video I am going to teach you how to improve your pronunciation by looking at pronunciation problems. A lot of students confuse words; or sometimes two words, they sound similar, and students confuse the pronunciation of those words. Okay? So in this video we’re going to look at five different sets of words, and I’m going to explain how to pronounce them, and: What are the differences in their pronunciation? So let’s get started. The first word that I want to practice is the difference between “word” and “world”. Okay? I know a lot of students have a lot of difficulty, especially with “world” because you have the “r” and the “l”, which is really challenging for a lot of students. So let’s learn how to pronounce these two different words. With “word”, I’ve written here the International Phonetic Alphabet spelling.

If you know this, great; if you don’t, don’t worry about it. This is just, if you do know this, this is how the word is in the IPA alphabet, the International Phonetic Alphabet. So if you want to pronounce this word, the first thing I want you to do is make an “er” sound. Can you do that? “Er”. “Er”, kind of like: “her”, “er”. Okay? Now what I want you to do is say the word: “were”, “were”, “they were”, okay? Now, if we add a “d” here: “werd”, “werd”. Okay? Can you say that? “Werd”. One thing that can help you sometimes is with rhymes.

If you know something that rhymes with the word it can also help you with the pronunciation. So this is the past tense of “hear”: “I heard”. Can you say the word: “heard”? “Heard”. “I heard the word”. So you see these have the same sound: “word”, “heard”. So the very basic part of this is if you can make the “er” sound, that’s the very basic part of it: “er”, “word”. This is also a kind of short sound: “word”. Now, I want you to compare that to this sound: “world”. Okay? This sound is a little bit longer for this word. “World”. So I have it here in the IPA or the International Phonetic Alphabet. Now, again, these two have the same vowel sound: “er”, so I want you to start with the pronunciation of this word by making this sound: “er”, “er”. Okay? Now, again, I want you to make the sound: “were”, “were”, “they were”. Okay, now here’s where it might get a bit tricky for some of you because of the “l”, I want you to add an “l” to this sound.

“Werl”, “werl”. Okay? And at the very end, your tongue when you make the “l” should be touching the roof of your mouth: “werl”. Okay. Now we’re going to add the “d”: “werld”, “werld”. Okay? So now let’s compare these two. I want you to say after me: “word”, “world”, “word”, “world”. Do you hear the difference? Okay. So this is something you can practice. Again, start with the “er” sound, that will really help you in the pronunciation of this. Now let’s look at some other words that are commonly confused.

Okay, so the next sounds or words that are very commonly confused in their pronunciation are the words: “walk” and “work”. Okay? Many students pronounce these as the same, but they’re quite different. So let’s look at “walk” first. Okay? So, again, I’ve written the International Phonetic Alphabet, if you know it; and if you don’t know it, that’s totally fine, you don’t need to know it for this lesson. This is just if you know it. So, one of the main mistakes people make with the word “walk” is with the “l”. Okay? Some students, they try to pronounce the “l” and they’ll say: “wallk”. The “l” is silent; we do not say the “l” at all. Okay? So, imagine this is the word “walk”… Well, it is the word “walk”. I’m just going to remove that.

So, it looks more like: “w-a-k”, “wak”. Okay, so the first sound I want to practice is the vowel sound because this is where a lot of students have problems, is with the vowel sound. It’s an “aw” sound, okay? So, I want you to remember when you last went to your doctor. Okay? So imagine you’re at the doctor’s and they want to look inside your mouth, you have to make a sound, you say: “Aw”. Right? When you go to the doctor’s you say: “Aw”.

I want you to make that sound: “Aw”, “aw”. Okay? Notice my mouth is very open for this sound. It’s not closed. It’s: “aw”. Okay, so you need to make that sound to make this word. Now I want you to say: “wa”, “wa”. All right? It’s not a relaxed sound. Your mouth is very… It feels like you’re doing work with it: “wa”, “wa”. Okay? Now I want you to add the “k”: “wak”, “wak”. All right. Now, again, your mouth for this… This is my mouth, these are my lips, it’s very open, but it’s not wide, it’s narrow: “walk”. Okay? Again, if you have trouble with these words, it’s sometimes a good idea to practice in front of a mirror. Okay? So, see what your mouth is doing in front of a mirror, that can help you. Now, I want you to compare this with the vowel sound in: “work”.

Okay? Does my mouth open up a lot? “Work”, “walk”. No. There’s a big difference in what my mouth is doing. So, with “work” we need, again, to make this “er” sound: “her”, “er”. Okay? So I want you to make that sound: “er”. Now I want you to say the word: “were”, “were”. So similar to what we just did with “world” and “word”: “were”. Okay. Now I want you to add a “k” to this: “werk”, “werk”. Okay? “Work”. Now let’s try to compare the two sounds. Can you say this one? “Walk”, “walk”, “work”, “work”. Okay, so again, main difference is in what your mouth is doing. In this your mouth is very open, and in this one it’s not really that open.

All right, so now let’s look at some other words that are commonly mispronounced or confused in their pronunciation. Okay, so the next two words that many students make mistakes when they’re pronouncing is: “bird” and “beard”. Okay? So a “beard” is on a man when they have this… Like, hair coming down from their chin. This is a beard. Okay? Whereas a “bird”, you know, there’s different types of birds, they’re a type of animal. So I’ve noticed many students want to say: “bird”, but they say “beard” instead. Okay? So let’s look at the difference in these pronunciations. So let’s start with “bird”. Okay, so to start with this sound I want you to make an “er” sound. Again you’ll notice a lot of these words have the same “er” sound. “Er”. “Ber”, “ber”, “berd”, “berd”. Now, I want you to really look at my mouth. Am I smiling when I say this word? “Bird”.

No, I’m not smiling. Okay? So you do not smile when you say the word “bird”. You have a very small mouth, in fact: “bird”. And it’s kind of serious looking: “er”, “bird”. The sound is also very short. We’re not saying: “biird”, no, no, no. It’s short: “bird”. Now compare this to: “beard”. Okay? In this word we do smile, and that’s one of the big differences. You do not smile with the word “bird”, but you smile with the word “beard”. Okay? So, to start with I want you to make an “e” sound: “ee”.

This is usually the sound we make when we’re having our picture taken. Sometimes we say: “Cheese”, “ee”. Okay? “Ee”, now I want you to say: “bee”, “bee”. “Beer”, “beer”. “Beerd”, “beerd”. Okay? And you’ll also notice this sound is a lot longer than this sound. “Bird”, “beard”. Okay? This sound kind of makes your mouth feel a little bit tired after because it’s very tense. Your mouth is not relaxed. “Beard”. Okay? So I’m really using my muscles, whereas for this sound: “ber”, no, your mouth is very small, you’re not really using so many muscles.

Okay? So, this is something a lot of students should really practice, especially if you have trouble with your… This sound: “er”, with “ee”. Okay? So now let’s look at some other words to pronounce. Okay, so our next word is: “man” and “men”. Many students confuse these two things. “Man” is one person, “men” there’s more than one; you can have two men, three men, four men. So, they mean the same thing, but the difference is this means multiple people… Okay? So I’ll show multiple men, versus one. Okay, so now let’s look at the pronunciation of these two words. “Man”. To start with I want you to practice the name: “Anne”. Okay? And notice my mouth, it’s big: “Anne”. It’s almost like I’m eating a hamburger or something. “Anne”. Okay? My mouth is very wide and also very tall: “Anne”. Now what I want you to do now is just add an “M” to the name “Anne”: “Manne”. Okay? “Manne”. And, again, it’s great to practice this in front of a mirror.

“Manne”. Now, I want you to compare this sound to: “men”. Is my mouth really big for this one? “Men”. “Man”, “men”, no, there’s a big difference. For “man” I have a very big mouth, for “men” my mouth is quite small. So, to start with the pronunciation of this sound, I want you to say the letter “n”, “n”. What letter is this? This is an “n”. “N”. Now, I want you to add an “m”, so this becomes “men”. “N”, “men”. “Men”. If you have a lot of trouble with this and you can never remember: “Oh, which one do I have the big mouth for, which one do I have the little mouth for? I’m so confused.” If you can say this word, the number “ten”, you can say this: “men”. You can remember: There are ten men. Okay? And that makes sense, because “men” is plural. Ten men. They rhyme, so that can help. So again, this one is a smaller mouth.

So let’s quickly say the two words and just, you know, practice the pronunciation. “Man”, “men”. Okay? So now let’s look at our last pronunciation problem. Okay, so our last words are: “woman” and “women”. A lot of students make mistakes with these two words. A lot of students will actually say: “Whoa man”, which is not correct. So, a lot of students they don’t even know they’re making this mistake, but it is a very common mistake students make. So let’s learn: What are the correct pronunciations of these words? So let’s get started with “woman”. So I’ve drawn here a woman and I’ve drawn here women so you can remember this is for one person, and this is for multiple people. Okay? So, I have, again, the IPA written. So I guess to begin let’s talk about this “o” sound. A lot of students think that when they pronounce this they should make an “o” with their mouth: “o”.

You do not make this sound with this word. You do not say: “whoa”. Okay? What you actually do is it’s a kind of smaller sound. I want you to think of the word “book”, “uh”, “book”. Or: “cook”. Now, notice my mouth. It’s not as big as “o”. Mm-mm. “Uh”, “book”, “cook”. If you’re a Star Wars fan, you can also remember the sound if you think about the character Wookie, Wook, Wookie. Okay? So same sound that’s in “woman”. Okay, so I want you to say: “uh”, “book”, “uh”. “Wuh”, “wuh”. Okay. Now, if we look at the word “min”, like “minute”, that’s for… We don’t say “man”. It’s more a softer sound, like “in”, “min”. “Wuh min”, “wuhmin”. Okay? So I want you to repeat after me: “wuhmin”. And again, make sure you’re not making an “o”.

You should not make an “o”. “Woman”. Now, I want you to compare this with: “women”. Okay? So there’s a difference here. For this sound I want you to start with the word “in”, “in”. “Im”, “im”. Okay? Now you can say: “wim”, “wim”. Okay? And notice my lips, they’re not rounded. Okay? They’re kind of: “im”, so they kind of look like… Not the greatest artist, but this is my mouth. Actually it’s smaller than this: “im”, “im”, “wim”. Okay? You can also think of the word “win”. “I win”, “wim”, very similar sounds. So now I want you to say: “wim”, “wim in”, “wimin”. Okay? All right, so now let’s compare these two sounds. “Women”, “women”, “woman”, “woman”. Okay? Now, if you’re not getting this right away, that’s okay. Number one thing: Try not to say: “Whoa man” because that sounds really strange.

So: “woman”, they’re softer pronunciations, and “women”. This is really good to practice in front of a mirror and to actually watch what your mouth is doing to make sure you’re not… You know, you don’t have a giant… Like, a very widely-opened mouth. It’s good to check in a mirror to make sure you’re doing the pronunciation correctly. I also recommend visiting our website at www.engvid.com. There, you can actually take a quiz to practice the different pronunciations we’ve learned today, so I highly recommend you visiting our website and taking that quiz. Until next time, take care..

As found on Youtube

Learn English: Expressions that use body parts!

E, what did I tell you about leaving your socks on the fl…? Hi. James from engVid. Little upset now. E leaves his socks all over the place. He only has one foot, but he seems to leave them everywhere. I’m always on your back? This lesson is about body parts, like the back, and how we use them to show or express our feelings, emotions, or thoughts on a situation. Stick with me, and we’ll take your head out of the clouds and teach you some English. You ready? Let’s go to the board. Notice E is saying: “You’re always on my back!” Well, I’m going to come over here and I’m going to show you the body parts, and then I’ll show you an idiom… Or, sorry, let’s say a phrase or an expression that we use to indicate our thoughts or feelings on something, or about someone.

Right? So, why don’t we start with…? Well, what does it say here? Number one, your head. Okay? Your head. If someone says: “Your head is in the clouds”, you’re a dreamer, which means you don’t really think about real things; work, eating, life. You’re thinking: “One day I’m going to fly off and I’m going to visit a country, and I’m going to…” And someone will say: -“Do you have money?” -“No.” You’re a dreamer. Your head is in the clouds. Right? Get your head out of the clouds. Come back to reality. Come back to the real world. That’s number one: “head in the clouds”. Let’s look at number two: “let your hair down”. This is kind of funny because I really don’t have any hair. Let’s just say I had hair. Okay? And my hair is up, like this. Okay? My hair is up. Okay? If I let my hair down, I’m going to relax. My hair is now relaxed. You like that? Purple. It’s cool. “Let your hair down” means have fun, relax, take it easy. Don’t be so serious. Okay? And that’s our hair there. Just see that? Let it down, relax a bit.

How about number three? “Be all ears”. Well, clearly I have only two and I cannot be covered with ears, but “be all ears” means I am focused, I am incredibly… I’m listening to you right now, incredibly focused. So when someone is all ears, it means I’m listening, you have my attention, I’m not thinking of anything but what you are saying. “Be all ears”, and there are your ears. Okay? How about this one? “Lip service”. Those are little lips. Maybe you can’t see them. So here are mine. Lips. Lip service is funny. “Service” means to do something for someone. But “lip service”, it’s actually… Because I have “insincere”, but that might be a big word for you. But it means I don’t really believe it or I don’t really want to do it. So, when you give lip service you say: “Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah”, but you really aren’t going to do it or you really don’t believe in it. Example: Your mother comes home and said: “Okay, you know what? You put the plate over there and the cup over there.

Could you do me a favour? Could you pick it up and put it away?” And you’re watching or playing video games or soccer, and you’re like: “Yeah, yeah, yeah, I’ll do it. Uh-huh. Uh-huh.” You have no intention or you’re not going to do it. You just say: “Yeah, yeah, yeah” to make your mother happy so she thinks you’re going to do it, but you’re not going to. If your boss or employer gives you lip service, they say: “Sure, we’ll give you more money. Everything will be okay. Just go back to work.” It’s lip service. They’re not going to give you any more money, but they expect you to go back to work. Watch out for lip service. Right? Lips. Let’s look at number five. Chin, this is your chin right here.

If you’ve ever seen Superman, Superman has a chin of steel. Big chin. Okay? Now, when somebody says: “Keep your chin up”, your chin is probably here and you’re: “[Whines]”. You’re upset and they say: “Keep your chin up. Don’t be sad. Be happy. Be strong, like Superman.” That’s your chin right here, right underneath your lips. Chin. Okay? “Be on someone’s back”, that’s what E was saying. Well, if you’ve ever had to carry something really big, I don’t know, like… Hold on a second.

I’m still here. This is on my back. It’s really heavy and it bothers me. You know? It’s a pain. It’s upsetting. When something’s on your back, it’s always… They’re always bothering you. “Oh, you’re always on my back asking about giving you money” or “You’re always on my back asking me to help you. Oh, it’s such a… Get off my back, will you? Leave me alone. Don’t bother me. Upset me.” Okay? So if somebody’s on your back, they’re upsetting you, bothering you. I know, my stickman doesn’t have a back, so just for you: The back is here. Okay? So that’s why I was on E’s back, saying: “Pick up your socks.” It means I probably ask him to pick up his socks every hour or every day. Next, where are we? So that was six. Number seven, chest. This is your chest right here. Okay? If… Where we got? Seven right there. The front. So back is the back, chest is the front. If you get something “off your chest” it means you tell someone how you feel, like you really feel.

Like, so maybe someone said: “Hey, look, I can’t come to your party tomorrow and I’m not going to get you a present for your birthday”, and you’re like… They might say: “Is there something on your chest or something you want to get off your chest?” You go: “Yeah! I want to tell you I’m not happy about that. I was never happy about this situation.” Get it off your chest, it’s like open your heart and tell them the truth. Do you have something you want to get off your chest? Something you want to tell me? All right? Tell someone how you really feel, off your chest. Now, here’s a funny one, arm. This is your arm, that is his arm. I’m left-handed, so I write with this hand if you ever noticed. So this expression is kind of funny because, well, most people are right-handed, they use this hand and it’s very valuable to them because they write with this hand, they hit balls with this hand, or catch with this hand.

They do many things with this hand. So, when somebody says to you: “You have a Mercedes? I’d give my right arm… My right arm, my whole arm for a Mercedes”, it means: This arm is so valuable, I do everything with it, but to have that car I would give my arm for it. Now, I might give my right arm because I’m left-handed, it doesn’t matter to me, but for you it’s very valuable. So if you ever hear of someone said: “I’ll give my right arm to be a professional golf player”, or a golf… Yeah, golf player, whatever. Or tennis player, or a soccer or football player, professional. “I’d give my right arm.” They’re saying that is so important to me I would give this important body part to have that. All right? What would you give your right arm for? To be with Mr. E? [Laughs] Just joking. Back to work. Okay. So, number nine, finger. My finger. And you notice I have finger there.

Well, in this case when we say number nine is: “Put my finger on something”, something is wrong. I’ll give you an example. Your friend is coming out, they’re wearing the skinny jeans, and a big flowery top with a funny hat. And you’re going… They say: “Hey. How do I look?” You’re like: “There’s something I don’t like about this, but I can’t put my finger on it.” It means: “I know I don’t like it, but I don’t know exactly what it is.” Or an example would be music. You hear a song at the club, you’re dancing, you’re having a fun, and all of a sudden a new song comes on: “Dom-dom-dom-dun-nuh-dom-dom”, and you’re like: “Uh, I don’t like that song, but I can’t put my finger on it. I don’t know why I don’t like it, but I don’t like it.” You know? That would be for number nine. When you can’t put your finger on something, it’s: “I know I don’t like something, but I can’t either tell you the exact word why or I don’t have an exact reason to point out and say why I don’t like it.” All right? Now, number 10 is leg.

This thing. One second. Let me try again. Leg. Okay, leg. When you “pull somebody’s leg”, which is like pulling, pull, pull my leg, it means to joke with someone or to tease. So I might say to Mr. E: “Hey, E. You want a pair of pants? Jeans?” Well, I’m pulling his leg because he only has one leg, so what does he need pants for? You’ll go: “Poof, go away, James. Go back to teaching English.” All right? So, when you tease or joke with somebody, like: “I’m only joking with you”, I’m pulling your leg – I’m joking. I’m not serious, I’m just trying to have fun with you. That’s pulling someone’s leg.

That’s leg. Foot. I’m getting too old for this. So your foot goes in here. Okay? This is a shoe. You put your foot in here. All right? There we go. So, when you “put your best foot forward”, that’s your foot there, what it means is you show people your best quality. What is the best about me? So if I’m smart, I’ll show you I’m smart, or I’m flexible. I’m not flexible, but here we go. That’s it. I can’t bend anymore. Or I’m good at telling jokes, or drawing people. I would put my best foot forward and show you what I’m very good at. So you do that when you meet people for the first time. You put your best foot forward. Or when you want a job, so they can see: What is really good about you? Okay? And there’s number 12, and it makes my “blood boil” when I forget to do things. I forgot to do number 12. Blood boil. What does “blood boil” mean? Well, I’m going to help you out here. So, doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo. And remember I said it makes my blood boil? Well, “blood” is inside of you. If I cut and something comes out, that’s called blood.

“Boil”, when you make tea, you put the water on and it starts to boil. It means… So, in this case the blood gets hot or you get angry. It just makes my blood boil when… When people won’t let me sit down on a long journey or trip. Or it makes my blood boil when someone’s in the washroom for a very, very, very long time and I need to go. It makes me angry. All right? It made my blood boil when I forgot to put number 12, because now instead of going one to 12, I’ve got 12 to one, and I’m angry about that because I should know better. Right? So, quick recap: Head, hair, ear, chin, lip, arm, finger, chest, leg, foot, back, and blood boil are body parts which I’ve shown you, and these are all the expressions we use to explain to someone how we feel or what’s going on in our head.

And if you like that, I think it’s time for us to go and do the second part with the quiz. Are you ready? Let’s go. [Snaps] Okay. So, I forgot I want to do common collocations before I go on to your quiz. All right? So let’s look at some common collocations. We talked about, remember the other parts of the chin and the ear, and here are a couple that I may not have mentioned to you, but these words usually go together – collocation.

“Raise an eyebrow”. Now, “raising an eyebrow” is this. Ready? Ready? Here we go. See that? Raising that eyebrow. That one goes high. This is your eyebrow, “to raise” means to move up, so I raise my eyebrow. Sometimes you raise your eyebrow because you’re curious. Hmm, what is that? And sometimes because you’re suspicious. I don’t believe you, hmm. Right? So if someone’s suspicious or curious they’ll raise an eyebrow, or: “That raises an eyebrow.” Okay? Another one is “clear your throat”.

Now, I actually have a little bit of a cold, so I might clear my throat. It’s to clear… Clean it up, empty it so I can speak. But a lot of times when people clear their throat, they’re like: “Ahem”, because they want you to pay attention to them. Example, maybe two people are kissing, and you go: “[Clears throat]”, they go: “Oh, sorry. I didn’t know you were here. We wouldn’t have been kissing if that happened.” Clear your throat, get attention. “Shrug your shoulders”, that’s this. You know? -“Hey. You know where Tommy is?” -“I don’t know. I don’t know.” This is: “I don’t know.” These are your shoulders, shrugging them: “I don’t know.” “Thumbs up”, “thumbs down”. “Thumbs up”, I like it. “Thumbs down”, that sucks. It’s no good. Another word is approve, that is good. Disapprove, I don’t like. Thumbs up, thumbs down. “Give the finger”. Okay, I’m going to give you the finger now. Okay? Now, I know YouTube doesn’t like that type of thing. So, it’s an American thing. So, once again, when you give the finger-okay?-you take one finger, this finger here, and you take it away from the rest of them.

See? And you give someone the finger. It’s rude. Very rude. It’s like the “F you”. Okay? So, giving people the finger means you’re probably upset about something or you disagree, and after you say it you should run. [Laughs] Okay. Joking. “Roll your eyes”. I don’t know if you can see me rolling my eyes. Sometimes someone does something very stupid, and you’re like: “Oh my god.” Of course you won’t roll them that slowly. That actually hurt my eyes. But it means to move your eyes in a way to show people you think something is stupid or you’re very annoyed. “This line up is taking way too long. [Sighs].” Roll your eyes, showing it’s stupid or I am very angry at it. Cool? So these words you’ll hear. Right? Little phrases or collocations, and they come together regularly. Raise an eyebrow. That raised an eyebrow so I cleared my throat. But when they asked me what was wrong, I shrug my shoulders like I don’t know. And one of the guys said: “You wasted my time and gave me a thumbs down.” But you know what? I told him: “Yeah, well, whatever”, and gave him the finger.

And then the other guy said: “I don’t believe that guy.” Rolled his eyes with being annoyed. See? I used all of these together, and you can hear people use them in common interactions. You know, native speakers speak like this. Now it is time for our quiz. Are you ready? I’m going to give you first the phrase or the expression, and then we’ll look at what the meaning is and put it… The answer in the appropriate space or in the correct space. Let’s start with the first one: “blood boil”. Remember we talked about making tea and the water getting hot and boiling, and the blood’s inside? I know your blood is boiling right now because you want the answer.

Right? Well, yeah, that’s to get extremely angry. When your blood is boiling you’re very, very angry. What about the second one? “Give my right arm”. Oh, you’re correct. If you give your right arm or willing to give your right arm, I would do that… And this is my arm, remember, it’s because I really want something really, really badly that I’m going to say: “Take my arm and give it to me, please.” So it’s to give something of great value for something you really want.

C: “raise an eyebrow”. So I can just… Raising an eyebrow. What would that be? That’s right. Remember when you’re suspicious? I don’t believe that. Or curious, what is that? Right? So I’m going to put here “curious” as well because I didn’t put it up there for you, but it’s both. Being suspicious or curious, which would be number one. How about: “let your hair down”? Do you remember when I did that one? I had my hair and then I let it down. That’s right, relax and have fun. Have some fun. Now we’re going to do number E with your “head in the clouds”. Right? “Head in the clouds”. When I was a kid we had a song called: “Dreamer, you stupid, little dreamer. And now you got your head in the clouds, oh no.” Right? Old song. Old, old, old, old, old. Before my time but I remember it. Now how about the last one? I think you’re smart enough to figure out which one it is, but let’s just play anyway.

“Get something off my chest.” Which one is left? Oooo, right? Off your chest. Emotions. How do you feel about it? I like it. I don’t like it. If I want to get something off my chest usually it’s negative. “I need to tell you this, and you need to listen to me.” And that would be: Tell someone your feelings, your honest feelings about something. Get it off your chest.

All right? Good. Now, I think we’ve learned a lot. Right? I quite… Can’t quite put my finger on it, but I think it’s time for us to go. Yeah? That’s one of the ones we learned. Yeah? So once again I’d like to say thank you for watching. Always appreciate you watching. I want you to go to www.engvid.com in order to do the quiz and see how well you do, and take a look at some other videos. Don’t forget to, you know, subscribe, so press that button, touch that screen, whatever you do these days, and thanks a lot. We look forward to seeing you soon..

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Pimp Up your English Vocabulary – Slang Words | English Speaking Practice Lesson

 

As found on Youtube

British vs American | English Pronunciation Lesson

Hello and welcome everyone. This is Minoo at Anglo-Link. Today, we’re going to look at some differences in American English and British English pronunciation. In order to do that, I’ve teamed up with my American colleague Rachel, who is going to introduce herself to you now. I’m Rachel and I have a YouTube channel called ‘Rachel’s English’. My channel focuses on American English pronunciation. There are videos that go over the specific mouth proposition for each sound, videos that focus on the rhythm of American English, linking, and videos that show you how to listen to the characteristics of American English.

There are over two hundred and fifty videos with two added each week. I hope you’ll check them out. Thank you Rachel. Okay, I will be focusing on the differences between the consonants ‘r’ and ‘t’ and also some very common words that are pronounced differently in American English and British English. Rachel will be focusing on the differences between some vowel sounds. Let’s start with the letter ‘r’. When the letter ‘r’ is in the initial position of a word or in the middle of a word, there isn’t a huge difference between the way Americans or British people pronounce it.

However, listen to me saying the following four words and then listen to Rachel saying them. Now, when the letter ‘r’ is in the middle position in a monosyllabic word and after a vowel, after a vowel, in British English we tend to drop it. We also drop the letter ‘r’ at the end of words in British English, whereas in American English, there is no difference. Now, I’d like you to listen to me saying the following words and then listen to Rachel saying the same word immediately. Right then, let’s move on to the letter ‘t’. In standard British English, the letter ‘t’ is always pronounced as a /t/, whether it is at the beginning of a word, in the middle of a word or at the end of a word; whether it’s a stressed syllable or unstressed syllable.

For example, listen to these four words. However, in American English they tend to drop the ‘t’ in the final position. So, now listen to Rachel saying these four words. Now, listen to her saying the words ‘what’ and ‘cut’ again. Now, in American English, when the letter ‘t’ is in the middle position in a word, it sometimes changes to a soft (d). This happens either when it’s between two vowels or when it’s between an ‘r’ and a vowel. So, now listen to how I pronounce the following words, and immediately to how Rachel pronounces them. And finally, in American English, the letter ‘t’ is sometimes dropped after an ‘n’.

For example, in British English, we would say: Now, listen to how Rachel pronounces them. Okay, that’s all for the consonants ‘r’ and ‘t’. Now we’re going to look at some very common words in English, that are pronounced quite differently in British English and American English. So, I’m going to say them and then you listen to how Rachel says them. Well, I hope you’ve enjoyed this part of the lesson. To continue this lesson with Rachel, click here. She will be telling you about the differences in vowel sounds. If you want to subscribe to our channel, click here. And if you want to subscribe to Rachel’s Channel, click here. Thank you for watching. I look forward to seeing you in our next video. Bye now!.

As found on Youtube