Answering Your Questions on Learning English (Part 2) – Can You Understand This Real Conversation?

buy ashwagandha herb {“en”:”- Favorite thing in the whole world. – Hello everybody. This is Jack and… – Kate. – from ToFluency.com. Welcome to this live lesson here on YouTube. We are going to answer your questions about learning English, and if you have any questions, please ask us, whether you’re here live or watching the replay. Kate, what should they do (laughs) if they are new here? – Subscribe. – Subscribe. If you are new, subscribe and turn on notifications because we release conversations talking about different topics in English now on a regular basis, right? – Yes, uh-huh. – And I’ve left a link to all those conversations in the description. So, I’m just going to say goodbye to Facebook. Come join us on YouTube. Okay.

So, so, so, so… What have we done so far today, just to give people some context? – Sure. Well, we woke up at about five o’clock because– – Yeah. – Yeah. It’s actually been a long morning despite the fact that it’s not that late, and I then went back to sleep. (laughs) – You went back to sleep, which is very nice. – It was extremely nice, and then we had a babysitter come over to spend some time with our son and daughter, and we went and got coffee. – Yup. What kind of coffee did you get? – I got my first gingerbread latte of the season. – Your first one? – Yes. – Oh yeah, because normally you get the pumpkin spice. – Yes, pumpkin spice season is over.

It’s gingerbread latte season now. – Oh, that’s interesting. I just got a regular coffee with cream. Look at all these people joining online. – Oh wonderful, that’s exciting. – If you are watching live or watching the replay, please hit that like button so more people can find this. I’m just going to read some of the comments, and let’s see if I can do this. If we slide over a little bit Kate, other way. (laughs) There we go. So, we can read some comments live. – Okay. Hold on, let me just- – And everyone watching live can see them too. So, come say hi and tell me where you are watching from. Also, leave your questions in the live chat too. Adam, “Give us good free solutions to learn English.” – Ooh, that’s a good one. – So, free ways to learn English. – Well, one of the free ways is obviously just what we’re doing right now.

The more that you tune in to free content on YouTube, and other, and Facebook is a great way to get some practice listening and speaking. – Yeah, could you just lower your chair a little bit. (laughs) – I was just thinking that. I was just thinking, “I’m taller than you, and I kind of like it.” (laughs) – Yeah, I know you do. – I’ll put my chair down. I know. – Yeah, so listen. Listen as much as possible. – Okay, the elevator is going down. – You ready? That’s better, isn’t it? So yeah, listen as much as possible.

Watch English lessons on YouTube, but also watch things that aren’t made for English learners. – Yes. – In a way, I want you to go find other podcasts and YouTube videos where you can listen to anything that you’re interested in, and I think a good idea, as well, is to learn in English. – Yes, and that’s absolutely been proven true. If you’re both learning new content and English at the same time, that strengthens everything. It just helps your brain make the connections. And also, when you switch to regular content that’s made for English speakers, sometimes the pace is a little bit fast, the vocabulary is more rich or specific, there’s more jargon, so sometimes you just have to just be a little bit patient with that and repeat.

Pick out phrases that you think are interesting. I told you what I think my number one trait in successful English learners is, curiosity. I think that that is just the most important thing to learn anything. You have to be curious. You have to wonder about things, ask yourself questions, and then as you experience English, you can kind of start to fill in the blanks and learn. – What do you think the number one trait is in English learners? – To really want to learn. – To want to learn, yeah. – Because I’ve talked about, in the past, how if you say you’re too busy to learn English, a better way to frame that is to say, “It’s not one of my priorities right now.” And this could be a good thing or a bad thing. If you have children, that’s more of a priority, but a lot of the time, we can always do more.

And if you really want to do something and if you love doing it, then you’re going to do it. You’re going to find the time to do it. – Just thinking about that, I have some knowledge of Spanish and a little bit of French, and I want to continue learning, and I think that right now, our children are probably my number one barrier because I can’t just sit down, and find content, and learn online the way that I did before we had Thomas and Emma, who are our kids. But at the same time, maybe we can look for resources so that we can learn together. I just found some apps on my phone that I’ve been sharing with Thomas, and we’ve been kind of learning together at the same time, which is really neat. – Yes, yes. I have mentioned this before too when it comes to… If you have children, then watch TV shows in English. You need to find time to study and exercise. – Yes, (laughs) that’s multitasking. I’m not sure that I could do that.

(laughs) I’m very impressed. – Yeah, that such a great comment. I’m going to bring the comments up again. We’ll go through some of them quite quickly now. “I like the interaction of live lessons,” says Mariam. “I’m curious, Katy.” – Uh-oh. – (laughs) Let’s see what else other people are saying. “I don’t have anyone to have conversations with, so can you give me a suggestion?” This one here. “I can learn to speak English by myself. “Is it possible?” – Ooh, good questions. – Well, I have a method for this if you go to ToFluency.com/speaking. There will be a link in the description too. Because there are two main ways you can improve your speaking. Obviously, we need to learn grammar and vocabulary, but there’s natural practice, and then there’s something that I call the LRRC method. Do you know what that stands for? – Oh, my goodness. I’m on the spot here. – Sorry, I put Kate on the spot.

– No, no, I should know. I’m sorry. – Listen to a phrase, repeat it, record yourself repeating it, and then compare your version to the original, and then you get long-term repetition too, so you can improve your speaking from anywhere in the world. And a lot of people complain that they don’t have anyone to practice with, but you can do online language exchanges, you can pay a teacher to have a conversation with you, and make friends. – True. – Make friends. – Yeah. – Yeah. – Cool. Let’s go back to the comments. “Do you speak Arabic?” – I do not. – Do you speak Persian? – No, I do not. – (speaks in foreign language). (both laugh) – Jack has a very dear friend who is originally from Iran, and we tried to learn some phrases to surprise him, but I think we just confused him. (laughs) – Yeah, he didn’t understand what I was saying, unfortunately. “Do you have any idea about English films or series?” – Ooh. – I guess maybe a suggestion for people who want to learn English through movies or TV.

– Ooh, that’s an interesting one. I think I might have to think about that a little bit more, but if anybody’s had any TV shows or films that have really helped them, feel free to chime in. – Yeah, chime in to leave a comment in this situation. Yeah, what are we watching at the moment? – Well, we’re still watching Stranger Things. – Yeah. It only came out about a month ago, the second season. – But I like to do something called binge watching because the end of an episode always ends on a little bit of a cliffhanger, so the characters are in trouble, or something’s about to happen and you want to know what happens next, so I tend to sit down and just watch episode after episode, and then come back to it the next day. You can kind of space it out a little bit more, but life has just been a little bit hectic. We haven’t been able to watch TV as much as possible. – No. Yeah, so episodes end on a cliffhanger, which means it’s like in the middle of a story, an important part of it, and you really want to know what happens next.

– I’m excited. There’s a new series out on Amazon called Victoria. – Is it similar to Elizabeth? – The Crown, yes. – The Crown, right. – And there’s another season of that too, which I like that. I tend to like historical… – Historical shows. – Shows, yes. – Yeah, they’re fun. Let’s see. “I tried to do a language exchange, “but many people don’t correct you.” Oh, Esther is here. Esther is a long-time viewer. – Hello, Esther. – I think from Argentina. Let me know if that’s not correct. Some people are talking in French. “I can see what a beautiful day in your city.” What is the weather like today? – Beautiful. – Beautiful. – You’re correct. – Yeah, sunny. It’s warm. – Yeah, it is. It’s very warm. – For this time of year, yeah. “Watching movies can help us a lot as well.” – I prefer a TV series because you get more repetition in the language, and movies can be very artistic, and the dialogue is very quiet at times. It can be more difficult.

But I think TV series, it’s more conversational, especially when you think about something like Friends, everyday English. There’s so much in there. Denise is here. Good to see you, Denise. “What do you think about reading “classic books to improve English?” This is your topic. – Yes, this is something I’m really passionate about because I was an English literature teacher for several years. And I think that reading is a really interesting way to improve your vocabulary because there’s just so much richer language in novels, so novels are generally a much higher Lexile level than we speak in conversation. However, that can be a little bit of a trap in terms of your conversational English because, a lot of times, there is vocabulary in literature and grammar structures that we don’t actually use in everyday speech.

– Fantastic. – So, I think that reading is a wonderful way to improve your vocabulary, but it doesn’t always translate into speaking. One way to kind of get around this when you have enough of a level in English is to look into audiobooks, and the Lexile level is obviously the same, but you’ll actually get a sense of the rhythm of the language when it’s spoken, and so that can help. Yes. – Sorry, Lexile level? – Yes. – Explain. – It’s just basically, it’s kind of an arbitrary– Not arbitrary, but it’s a measure of the level of vocabulary, the complexity of the language, and the way that it’s used. – It’s just like how hard the book is. – How hard it is, and higher is not always better. – I agree, I agree. I made a video on comparing… I think it was maybe Pride and Prejudice with the original version and the graded reader, and a graded reader is an adaption of a book for English learners. – Yeah, so an adaptation that’s made just for English learners? – Exactly. And a lot of the time, if someone is an English learner…

And maybe you have felt like this too that, “Oh, I don’t want something that is adapted,” but it is very useful for English. – One thing, which is actually… I will completely admit this. I read a lot when I was younger, and so I had a vocabulary level that was a lot higher than my speaking level, if that makes sense. – It does. – And English is one of the only languages where we borrow from so many different languages, and there’s no standard English pronunciation, which I’m sure you have figured out, so when an English person or a native English speaker reads a word for the first time, they don’t know how to pronounce it, necessarily. – Exactly. – So, it’s interesting because we take pronunciation rules from so many different languages, which I think is really fascinating. So when I was little, I would mispronounce words a lot, especially longer words that I’d never heard used before, and so that’s one way to tell that people have learned a lot from reading, even native speakers. – Very good. That’s such a good point on audiobooks. So, let’s have a look. Let’s do some more questions.

– Ooh, are there any questions that are less about learning and more personal? Or not personal, but… – Oh, yeah. Yeah, feel free to ask us anything. – Within reason. – Within reason. – Yeah. Let’s answer some of these quickly now. So, (mumbles) “How writing should be used to improve English?” Or how can you improve your writing? I think write as much as possible, and I like a method where you copy. – Oh, okay. – So, you take a book, or an article, or a conversation, and you just copy it. – Copy it, okay. – Imagine drinking some tea with classical music and just copying. It’s nice and relaxed. – I think I’m really into the tea and the classical music, so that kind of connects the dots.

Actually, writing is really neat, the way that it can help you learn and reinforce what you’re learning because when you write, you’re using your body in a way that helps you make those connections. So actually, when you’re writing, you can have more deep, complex thoughts than you can without writing it down, so writing is a tool that helps us kind of go deeper into our thoughts and realize things, so as an English learner, if you just sit down and try to write in English, you will actually kind of help yourself learn the language a little bit more deeply.

So, when I was teaching middle schoolers, I would always have them… There’s two different ways to think about it. It’s writing to learn and learning to write, and so obviously, these two go together, but a lot of times, when you’re just writing in a way where you’re not worried about grammar or spelling, you’re just getting the words onto the page, that’s helping you learn at a deeper level. – Yeah, I love that. I write something every day for a good– – You do? – I journal. – You journal? Oh, neat. – Yeah, yeah. – I did not know that about you. I honestly didn’t know. – I do, I’ve journaled for two years every day, and I’m just going to show you what it’s like. – I promise, we’re actually married. We do know each other. (both laugh) – Look, Thoughts. I’ve just got this thing called Thoughts, and I just write my thoughts every day. – Is there a thought that you could share? – Yeah, okay. This is on the 23rd of November. “235 pounds on the dead lift. “Felt great, getting heavier and heavier. “Got four, will add five pounds next week.” Just very simple, but just talking about my progress in the gym, all those different types of things.

What? (Kate laughs) Kate’s prodding me. She’s pushing me, and I don’t know why. (laughs) – It’s the light. – Well yeah, so you want me to… – To come forward just a cinch. – Yeah, okay. (Kate laughs) So, Kate kept pushing me. (laughs) That reminds me of… I won’t say your specific example, but there are so many times in a restaurant or a bar, and I’m telling a story and Kate pinches me. (Kate laughs) It’s a pinch under the table, and I say, “Why are you pinching me?” But she’s doing that so I stop saying something. – Telling the story. Because usually you’re telling some story that’s really embarrassing for me, and so I’m like, “Jack, stop telling this story, stop.” But inevitably, instead of stopping, you turn around and go, “Why are you pinching me?” (laughs) – Exactly, exactly, when I should just stop saying what I’m saying.

– (laughs) Well, I think I also maybe need to be a little bit less sensitive. – Right. Shall we go quickly? – Okay. – “When will you guys go live again?” – Ooh. – Maybe next week? – Yeah, maybe – “What do you think about reading the Harry Potter books to improve vocabulary?” – I am all for it. (laughs) – I have never read a Harry Potter book. – You know what? I think that we will read them with our son eventually because they’re great, and I really like the way that JK Rowling, she uses the English language in really interesting ways. So, everything that she names that’s imaginary is really kind of clever. – Very good. “You use pounds?” So yeah, I was talking about pounds for weight.

I do now, because in the UK, we use usually stone but kilograms too, but I’m used to pounds now. – In my head, whenever you say stones, I’m like, “What stones?” – It’s confusing. – Like, I’m trying to imagine an actual stone. – Well, it’s like cups in America for measuring things. But yeah, here’s a great phrase. I used to use pounds, but now I am used to… No, I used to use kilograms, but now I’m used to pounds. Used, use, used, use. I made a video on that as well. I’ll leave a link below. “Could… (laughs) “Could Kate beat you up?” (Kate laughs) Probably. You’re very feisty. – I am feisty, but I don’t know if I could beat you up. I don’t think I would want to, in any event. – “How to get rid of shyness when speaking English?” – That’s hard. – Get out of your comfort zone, I say, little by little. I was so nervous about making videos at first, and I made a video and shared it with a few people, but you have to make that effort to get out of your comfort zone, to do something that’s a little bit uncomfortable, and then you can build on that, and it soon becomes normal.

– I have a couple of ideas as well to help that because that’s something that I really struggle with too, especially in foreign languages. And my first suggestion is to just try to make it a situation where you feel the most comfortable speaking. So, if you’re somebody that really likes to have kind of quiet conversations, see if you can find a language exchange. If you’re somebody that’s comfortable in crowds, maybe join in a YouTube conversation or a language community to practice speaking.

And then, this is actually something that really doesn’t apply to everyone, but if you are somebody who does drink alcohol or feels comfortable drinking alcohol, they actually came out with a study that you speak better in a foreign language when you’ve had a drink or two, and I think that’s because… And this is true for everybody. There’s inhibitions. We’re kind of held back from speaking in a foreign language, and alcohol lowers that just a little. So, it’s not necessary by any means, but that is something that you can try. Like, you think that you’re speaking better, and you might actually be speaking better. – Yeah, because your confidence increases too, definitely. And a lot of the time, people don’t speak because they’re worried about making mistakes. It’s so common that people stop themselves from speaking because they don’t want to make those mistakes, and I felt this in a huge way in Spain where you don’t want to talk about things. But also– – And sometimes, you actually are making mistakes, and that’s okay too.

– Exactly. – And those are the funniest stories. I’m not sure if I’ve told this story before, but when we were living in Spain, I went to get new contact lenses for my eyes, and basically, I went in and I said that I needed “lentejas,” which are lentils, little tiny beans. I was like, “I need lentils to put in my eyes.” And I’m so glad that I had the confidence to just go in and ask because it’s the funniest story now. But you know, when you think about it in your head, what’s the worst that could happen? – Yeah, definitely. – You have a funny story. – And we don’t care if someone makes a mistake. – Oh, not at all. I think that the fear in your head is 100 times greater, and you think that people are so worried about you making mistakes, but the reality is that most of that is just in your head. Nobody cares as much as you do, if that helps.

– Very good. Israel says, “Listening is very hard for me.” Kate mentioned something before, which is repetition, and I’m going to start talking about repetition a lot. Do you understand? (laughs) – You’re going to repeat and repeat? – Yeah, exactly. I’m going to keep repeating– – Keep repeating. (laughs) – how important repetition is because it is vital. So, what I want everyone to do as well is to watch this lesson again because you’ll understand so much more the second time. – And just something that can help with listening, especially if you find reading easier, is to watch things with subtitles, not in your language but in English.

And sometimes your brain will translate that back, but that’s a way of reinforcing the language, and then eventually you can get to the point where you take the subtitles away and you just listen to the language on the screen and help your brain make those connections. I have found that really helpful in the past. – So, here is a good strategy. You can watch it the first time without, second time with, and then without. – Or two times with and two times without, but that progression from with English subtitles to no subtitles can be really helpful. And a lot of times you know a word because you’ve read it, but you don’t know how it sounds in conversation, especially with relaxed pronunciation where the words kind of go together, et cetera.

– “I’m gonna wanna to go soon.” – Yes. – “I’m gonna wanna to go.” – Oh, I thought you meant right now. (laughs) – No, no, that was an example. – I was like, “Okay, okay, we’re ready, let’s go.” – I was very relaxed. I’ve got an answer for this. Breezy day, “What is the hardest thing “about English grammar?” What’s the hardest part of English grammar? For me, English grammar isn’t hard or easy. It’s just whether you have had repetition with it because people say irregular verbs are hard, but everyone here, I’m sure, can say “I am, you are, he is.” That’s an irregular verb, but you say this all the time, therefore you can use it. And it’s the same with phrasal verbs. I imagine people can say, “I wake up, I wake up at” because of the repetition of this.

And that’s what I teach in my method, so go to ToFluency.com/speaking to learn more about this. There’ll be a link below. “Use subtitles in YouTube, I do also.” Yeah, I add the subtitles to most videos because I know how important it is. (laughs) I don’t know what you’re laughing about. – I don’t know. – (laughs) I’m laughing too. Valdinei, “I have just shared your video on my Facebook.” – Thank you. – Thank you so much. Yeah, if you are enjoying this, then please share it. You can also, you know, on YouTube, you can share it through messenger or your messages, or WhatsApp, so you can send it to individual people too.

“Do you want your children to learn another language?” – Yes, very much so, and I think that this is just going to be an ongoing process because we had intentions to help our son by raising him bilingually in Spanish and English. But even though we had that intention, it hasn’t quite turned out that way, so we’re just continually working to try to expose him to different languages and to work with that because that is such a gift to be able to speak another language, not only to communicate with everyone else, but also just to have a brain that can understand other cultures and other ways of thinking about the world and speaking. – Yeah, so Kate used a few good phrases there.

It hasn’t turned out that way, which means like… How would you explain “turn out”? – “Turn out”? Just the end result. – The end result, perfect. I need you here. (both laugh) So yeah, the end result at the moment isn’t what we intended in the past, but there’s still time. And he is learning English. Sorry, Spanish, at school. – He is. – Because he says, “Buenos dias,” doesn’t he? – He does, it’s adorable. – Sometimes, “Uno, dos, tres.” Someone had a question. “Do you guys have any habit phrases “that you use a lot in conversation?” In my program, the ToFluency program, that’s what I give you, over 1000 fluency phrases that we use. They’re from the conversations that we have, and I give them to you in audio format and also as memory cards, memory cards so that you can get that repetition.

– Like flash cards? – Yeah. – Cool. – I call them memory cards. Maybe I should change that name. – That’s okay. – Also, if you can think of a better name for the LRRC method, let me know. – (laughs) Okay. – Yousef, “The first time I’ve joined your channel.” Thank you so much for being here. If you are new here, subscribe and click that notification bell. So, Dylan is here. “Love your lessons. “I’ve studied in Australia for more than two years.

“Most of the time, I stay here except for the holidays.” You’ve been to Australia. – I have. – Yeah, I want to go. “How can I be fluent in English without phrasal verbs?” – Just… – I think it’s… To be honest, phrasal verbs end up being a big part of fluency. – “End up.” – Yes, for example. (laughs) So, it’s just something to keep working on and to be curious about like, “Oh, that’s an interesting way to use that verb,” and just to remember it and to be open to it. It’s like, is there… I don’t know if there’s a name for this phenomenon, but once you’re aware of something, you see it everywhere.

– Confirmation bias, right? – Oh, it that what it’s called? – Oh, I think that’s … No, conversation bias is when you are looking for anything that supports your argument, so I guess it’s true. It’s similar, isn’t it? But it’s like when you get a new car, you’re looking at other cars. You get new shoes, you’re looking at everyone’s– – You see everyone else’s shoes. You get new phrasal verbs, you hear them everywhere. (laughs) – Yeah, definitely. “I feel bored with memory cards. “Is it okay for me to keep the LRRC method without it?” Definitely. The other thing with memory cards is delete the ones… If a card is boring, it means you know it, so delete it, and then you can use the ones that will help you. – Yes. – Got some nice comments. – Woo-hoo, thank you. – “Recommend to improve pronunciation, “Listen and try to repeat several times?” Yeah, and record yourself because then you can notice the differences between how you say it and how the original audio says it too. And then, it’s important to know the sounds and how to make them, and this is inside the ToFluency program too. – And that’s part of that confidence too.

And actually, sometimes when I hear my own recorded voice, I think, “Oh no, it that what I sound like?” Because in my head, I just sound so confident and so… – Sassy. – Sassy and so, I don’t know, so grown up, and then I hear my voice, and to me, it sounds like, you know, not that way. And so, but the more that you speak and the more that you hear your voice recorded, just like I’ll hear this voice recorded, you build your confidence. – “The way you speak is beautiful,” Khadija. – Thank you. (laughs) – Yeah, and also, you do sound different when it’s recorded. – Yes, your recorded voice is different. – Yeah, it is. But I’m also… I talked about this in the car. I don’t know if you were listening, but– (laughs) – How rude. I always listen to you.

(laughs) – I bought some courses on Black Friday to help me improve my speaking voice. – In Spanish? – No, English. – Oh, okay. See, everybody’s learning. (both laugh) – Yeah, but it’s more about the way you speak and breathe, and like coming from the diaphragm, and I’ve learned that there are different types of voices. There’s the nasal voice, the throat voice. – The throat voice. – The chest voice. – The chest voice. – And then, the diaphragm voice. – The diaphragm voice. (laughs) – Kate can’t do it. – I need to take the course. (laughs) – But it’s really interesting. And also, they have different warmup exercises for your mouth. – They don’t say “Benedict Cumberbatch”? – Benedict Cumberbatch, Benedict Cumberbatch. – I love it. (laughs) – What is that article? – If you are not familiar with the work of this very talented actor from Great Britain, he also has one of the most ridiculous names, and if you Google it, you will see all of the ways that people have messed it up, and I love it. – He’s from Sherlock. That’s how most people– – Know him. – He’s Sherlock Holmes. Margarida, who is a ToFluency program member, “I love memory cards.” – Oh, great.

– Yeah, and also, you can make them enjoyable if you have fun with them because you get a flash card, and if you just read, it’s boring, but if you repeat it and say it with some enthusiasm, an intonation, stress, then you’ll enjoy it, but also you’ll improve too. – Are you speaking from your diaphragm right now? – No. No, I need to practice. So you breathe in for five seconds, and then you hum. (both hum) Deeper. (Kate hums) – I’ll make a video on it. – Okay. – Basma, “Do you know, “I found formal English, it’s too hard.

“It’s harder than slang words.” Interesting. – Yeah, interesting. – Here’s a quick question. What is a new slang term that you have learned recently? – Oh, my gosh. I feel like I’m constantly learning slang terms and also abbreviations. – Abbreviations? – Mm-hmm. Like, for the longest time, I didn’t know that SMH stood for “shake my head,” so when you’re feeling– – You asked me that.

– I did. (laughs) – Yeah, and I think I– – Jack knows more about those kinds of things, so I just never knew what people were talking to. It means, like (sighs). – Have you listened or watched any videos from young YouTubers or Instagram people? – No. – Because that’s how you learn, and it confuses me. Everyone says “bro” these days. – “Bro”? – “Bro” or “bruh.” – “Bruh.” Or “Bae.” – Or “bae,” yeah. It’s quite crazy. “Is it a problem if we mix British with American English?” I don’t think so. – I guess we kind of do it all the time. – I do it all the– I don’t know which one is which anymore. – Yes. (laughs) – And because I have lived in America with kids, but I haven’t lived in the UK with kids, then there are certain terms that I don’t know what they are in British English.

– Yeah, or you know them, but you don’t use them. – It sound strange. – Like pacifier instead of dummy or crib instead of cot. – Diaper instead of– – What do you say? – Nappy. – Oh yeah. That’s neat. – Stroller and a pram. We’ll make a video on that. Hello to Indonesia. “Do you have any grammar lessons?” I do, and I have another one coming on Thursday. The difference between “will be going to” and the present continuous.

– Ooh, that’s one of my favorites. – (laughs) Really? Have you seen it? It’s very good. It’s the one where you criticize my hair hypothetically. – (laughs) I don’t criticize your hair. – No, but the hypothetical one. “I’d love to join your program, “but I still don’t have my blue card, payment card.” Just get in touch when you get that. – In the meantime, there’s a lot of resources that are available on YouTube and on Jack’s website too. – Definitely. ToFluency.com/speaking. I should give away some free memory cards. Do you think so? – Yeah, to give people a taste of kind of what’s inside your course? I think that would be a great idea. And to see whether the method is a good fit for what they need to practice speaking. – Yeah, definitely, definitely. Well, shall we wrap it up? – Yes. – We have another conversation coming very soon, next week. So again, if you’re new, please subscribe and click the notification bell, so then you’ll get an email from YouTube.

Do you get notified from my channel, Kate? – I do. – Yeah? As soon as you see the notification, do you swipe and watch the video? If you’re in it? (laughs) – Well… Yeah, and I think if anyone has– Because we probably did not get to all the questions, so if you have– And if you have any questions that you haven’t typed in, feel free to leave them and we’ll try to address those questions in our next video. – Oh, and do you want to ask a question for everyone, Kate’s question? – Yes. Because we’ve been speaking a lot about speaking, is there any English phrase, for whatever reason, that you particularly like to say? – I love that.

– Like, your favorite phrase to say in English. – It’s the one that you have in Spanish. – I’ll have to think about that. – We used to like saying “es que” all the time, “es que, bueno, es que.” (both laugh) What else did we used to like to say? – Let me think. I remember in Valencia, everyone used to say “mira.” – “Mira.” – “Mira,” like “look.” (laughs) It was something that was said with some attitude, and I really enjoyed saying that. I think I had a little bit of a different personality sometimes when I spoke in Spanish. – Definitely. – I was much more assertive, much more aggressive, and so maybe you’ll find that you have a secret English personality when you speak English a lot, which is different from your language. – Yeah, and that’s a really good point. Find your personality and be that personality when you speak in English. It’s a great opportunity to… – Be someone new. – Be someone new. And obviously, you’re still the same person, but just a little bit different. Okay. Everybody, if you have enjoyed this… Go on, Kate. What should they do? (laughs) – Subscribe. – Subscribe, like, share, and answer Kate’s question, which is, “Is there a particular phrase “that you like using in English?” Something that you just enjoy.

– Or a word that you think sounds really cool? (laughs) – Yeah, and please let me know if you have learned any new slang terms recently because I’m learning too. Fantastic. And if you want to watch more lessons, then I’ll leave some on your screen now. Thank you so much for being here. We’ll see you in the next conversation. Bye for now.. “}

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Study English in London