Retired teacher gives Trump a ‘D’ for writing

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As found on Youtube

Study English in Brighton

5 Rules (and One Secret Weapon) for Acing Multiple Choice Tests

{“en”:”When it comes to taking multiple choice tests, there’s this common piece of advice that often gets thrown around. “When in doubt, always choose C.” Right? Or maybe for you it was B ’cause this advice comes from everywhere. Maybe you heard it from your dad or your teacher or you read it on the internet. I’m pretty sure that I heard it from some kid in my eighth grade history class named Jimmy, but as Abraham Lincoln once didn’t say, “Always independently verify advice given to you “by eighth graders named Jimmy.” Truer words have never not been said. So today we are gonna go over some more well-founded and useful advice that you can use to make sure you ace that next multiple choice test you got coming up in the future. And I’ve got five main strategies to go through as well as one secret weapon of sorts, so let’s just get started. First off, when those test papers flutter down to your desk, don’t just start immediately going through the questions one by one in a linear fashion.

Instead, take a few minutes to go through and skim the test and just get a general overview of the questions. Now, as you’re doing this, you can answer any of the questions that stand out as really, really easy or that you’re really, really confident in, but another thing you’re doing by doing this whole little skim once over the test before you actually start in earnest is you’re priming your brain for some of the questions and details that are on the test as a whole. And this can be really, really useful for a couple of different reasons. One, you’re priming your brain to start thinking about some of the harder questions and we’re gonna get to that in a minute, but number two, sometimes multiple choice tests will have questions that hold details and hints or sometimes outright full answers to other questions on the test. For example, say you’re taking a history test one day and you come across a question like this.

Which American president’s death caused Napoleon to order 10 days of mourning in France? Now, as you’re going over the answers, you can eliminate one of them right off the bat, but the other ones, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, George Washington, you don’t know which of the three is the correct answer. So maybe you skip it, you go on into the test and then later, you come across a question like, true or false. Even though Thomas Jefferson and John Adams were bitter political rivals during the heyday of their careers, they eventually regained their friendship and kept it until both of their deaths in 1826. Now that question just established that Thomas Jefferson and John Adams both died in 1826 and say that you knew from some other source that Napoleon himself had died in 1821. If you knew that, then that question answers the previous question because both Thomas Jefferson and John Adams are not possible answers, therefore, it’s Washington.

These kind of details and questions aren’t always gonna crop up in your tests, and in any case, you probably shouldn’t waste a whole ton of your test time digging around for ’em because, you know, preparation is a much better strategy. You should hopefully come into the test prepared to answer most the questions in the first place, but it can be helpful in certain occasions, so just prime your brain with a little bit of a preliminary pass before you start in earnest. The second technique on my list is what Barbara Oakley’s book A Mind for Numbers calls the Hard Start, Jump to Easy technique.

And this is a technique where, basically, you jump into a difficult problem and you spend a couple of minutes thinking really deeply about it, but if you can’t get the answer to that problem, you move on. Now this is something you’re teachers have probably told you in the past, just to save time on your tests, but there’s another benefit that they might not have told you about. If you spend some time thinking about a hard problem, you’re engaging your brain’s focus mode. And I know this focus and diffused dichotomy is something I talk about a lot in these videos, but it’s really, really important. So while you’re using focus mode, you are concentrating on the problem and you’re using your conscious resources to try to solve it. But once you jump into a different problem, your subconscious resources, the more distributed parts of your brain, work on that difficult problem in the background. And then when you go back to the problem a little bit later, you probably have a better chance of answering it.

Oh, and my apologies to Dr. Oakley, but we have got to get a better name than Hard Start, Jump to Easy technique. So I’m gonna go ahead and recoin it the Tiny the Tiger technique ’cause it’s like that one boss battle in Crash Warped where you spend some time fighting the boss and then you switch over to avoid these tigers and go back and forth from there. Tip number three is to make sure that you read each question on your exam twice. Doing this is really, really important because multiple choice questions can be tricky and because they have a limited number of answers and those answers are just written out for you, it can be really tempting to simply skim over the question very quickly and then go to the answer that looks most familiar. But professors can be pretty sneaky when they’re writing these kinds of questions, so you need to watch out for a few things that can trip you up.

For example, some of the questions on your exams might ask you which of the following is not X, Y or Z. And it can be really easy to fail to see that word, not, if you’re going through really fast and just skimming the questions. Other questions might actually have more than one correct answer and your job there will be to find the answer that is most correct.

And of course, in that vein, there are also all sorts of questions that have all of the above or none of the above as potential answers and I am not too proud to admit that in several classes during my college career, I took tests very quickly and failed to see these types of answers on a few questions, which I, of course, got wrong. Tip number four is a tactic that I found personally useful all throughout high school and college and it’s to double check your answers as you get to the end of each page of your test instead of just waiting to do it all at the end. And the reason this is so useful is that once you get to the end of a page on your test, you probably only have five or 10 questions to go over and because you have so few, you’re probably not gonna rush or get intimidated by the number of questions you have to check and that’s gonna decrease the likelihood that you’ll skip over a dumb mistake or something that just should glaringly stick out and that’s gonna increase your scores.

Now this is not a replacement for giving your test a good once-over once you’ve finished it. And I definitely think you should be budgeting time at the outset of the test to do that, but by adding this technique into your test-taking arsenal, you can increase your scores even more. Alright, let’s move on to tip number five here. So if you come across a question that you just can’t get the answer to, or maybe you feel like the answer’s on the tip of your tongue, but you just can’t quite get it, try to envision yourself in the room in which you learned that piece of information. Maybe it was your classroom, maybe it was your normal study spot, but either way, science has shown that if you can envision the area where you learned something, it activates something called context-dependent memory.

Basically, humans are more able to remember things when they’re in the context or location in which they learned them, but research done in 1984 showed that if people simply envisioned the place in which they learned something, they can sort of, channel some of that ability even though they’re not physically in that room. Now, if even that doesn’t work, or maybe you’ve run across a question where you just absolutely have no clue what the answer is, you’ve never seen it before or you just can’t eliminate any of the choices whatsoever, well, it’s time to break out that secret weapon.

So, remember our friend Jimmy who gave us that old advice, you know, “When in doubt, pick C?” Well, yeah, Jimmy was wrong, but that’s okay, because instead of following some dumb rule or just randomly guessing, you can actually use statistics to exploit the way in which human beings typically write multiple choice tests. And that’s because, as the author William Poundstone points out in his book Rock Breaks Scissors, humans are pretty bad at creating actual random distributions of answers. During his research, Poundstone collected over a hundred multiple choice tests from all sorts of different sources. Schools, colleges, drivers exams, online quizzes, you name it, he got it. And that totaled over 2,400 questions. And what he learned from doing statistical analysis on all those questions was pretty surprising. First off, he did discover biases for individual letter answers, but those biases changed based on how many answers were available on the question.

For three answer questions, you know, A, B, C, there was no bias. And for four answer questions, the bias turned out to be B, not C, though it was a very statistically small advantage. 28% versus the expected 25%. And then, when we go over to five answer questions, you know, A through E, it was actually E that was the most common answer and C was the least commonly right answer. Those findings are just the type of the iceberg though, and personally, I find them far less interesting than all the other things he discovered. Including the fact that with true/false questions, there’s a definite bias toward true answers being correct. In his research, 56% of the time, true was the correct answer and only 44% of the time was false the correct answer. Even more interesting and potentially useful to you is the fact that a question has a higher than average likelihood of not having the same answer as the question that came before it. So if you have one question on a test where you knew the answer was C, you’re definitely sure of that, and then you move on to the next question and you’re stuck, or maybe you’ve narrowed it down to C or D, then it’s likely that D is the answer, not C.

And perhaps most astoundingly, for questions that had either an all of the above or none of the above answer present, that answer was correct 52% of the time, which means that if you’re stuck on a question and you can’t narrow it down, that answer’s your best bet. Now even though I had fun calling these findings a “secret weapon” of sorts, I really want to emphasize that you should only use them when you’re completely at a loss and you have to take a shot in the dark. You should use every other technique in the book to narrow things down, to give yourself some space, to use that Tiny the Tiger technique because, at the end of the day, all you’re doing is exploiting the way that people write tests.

You’re not actually learning anything and you’re not actually using your mental faculties to work with the actual information and content of the exam. Anyway, beyond all the tips in this video, the most important aspect to your success on any multiple choice test or any kind of test at all is preparation. And if you want to learn how to prepare for your tests more effectively, I actually just put together a resource on my website called The Ultimate Guide to Acing your Final Exams. And it collects everything that I’ve ever made related to exams, so if you haven’t seen all those videos or you’re looking for a specific tip, you might wanna check it out and you can find it on the card on the screen right now or in the description down below.

Beyond that, if you enjoyed this video, you can give it a like to support this channel, it’s much appreciated, and if you have additional tips on acing your multiple choice tests that I didn’t talk about right here, I would love to hear from you down in the comments below. If you wanna subscribe to this channel and get new videos on being a more effective student every single week, click right there and you can also click right there if you want to get a free copy of my book on earning better grades. Now the recommended video this week is actually something related to this because it’s about a technique called confidence tracking that can help you even further increase your scores on multiple choice tests, so check it out.”}

As found on Youtube

Study English in Brighton

Pokemon Go -0.51.0 50000 Xp within 30 minutes(English) 1.21.0

{“en”:”Whatsapp Guys!!! My Name is Monish and today im going to show you How you can earn 50,000 XP in just 30 minutes. Their is no Hack or Tool used for this trick We use a single Item provided by a Pokemon Go which is Lucky Egg The benefit of this Item is , we get double the Xp we earn in the active 30 minutes. So let me show you how do we use Lucky Egg ? So Lets Get Started. So let me show you How you can earn Lots of Xp in 30 minutes with the help of Lucky Egg. You can use Lucky Egg, But in which of this it would be more beneficial depends Upon your Decision. As you can see we get 1000 Xp for Evolving a new Pokemon 600 Xp for Catching a New Pokemon , 500 Xp for Evolving a Pokemon 500 Xp for hatching a new pokemon and others. Whenever I meet People or Friends in Park, Stores or Nearby Places They say i dont go for small Pokemon like ratatta, Pidjey, spearrow or weedle. When i ask them, Whats the reason They simply say this pokemons dont have enough Cp for Gym Battle. They forgot this are the Pokemon’s which give more Xp while Catching because you see lots and lots of Pidgey in your nearby Surrounding So through this Trick im going to show you how you can earn 50000 Xp.

So lets get Started. First You have to Go in Items, Click on Lucky Egg through which the Lucky Egg Gets activated for 30 min After this I need to evolve as much Pokemons i can evolve within 30minutes. Sorry Guys i forgot to show you that My total Xp is 3640 for now including Abra Now i evolve the Pokemons and Fast forward the Evolution. I have evolved 15 to 16 Pidgeys, So now I will evolve some Rattatas. I have Evolved 10 Ratattas , So now let me Go for some weedle. Evolution of Weedle has been over, So now Let me go for Eevees I have not named any Eevee till now, So let me name them first. So here you can see, I got 50,500 Xp in just 30 minutes If you had done this without any Lucky Egg You had got only 25,000 Xp. I have approximately Evolved 48 to 50 Pokemon because of which I got 50,500 Xp in 30 minutes of time You can say this is some type of Pidgey or Ratattas Magic because of them you get so many Xp in less amount of time.

This is the reason i go for smaller ones Make a entire use of Bag and then go with the Lucky Egg Item So here we started with some 3650 Xp I think i forgot, somewhat 3600 Xp So now you can see i have 54290 Xp So here you can say that i have covered my 50% of level 22 with the help of Lucky Egg. Friend If you loved this video dont forget to Like, Comment and Subscribe my channel and folow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Thank You And here im going to show you how you can remove a soft ban Evolveing a Magikarp, This is to show you on which Cp you should evolve a Magikarp How you can catch Rare pokemons with the help of Pokesnipers in Pokemon GO. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in Brighton

One Simple Method to Learn Any Language | Scott Young & Vat Jaiswal | TEDxEastsidePrep

{“en”:”Translator: Alina Siluyanova Reviewer: Denise RQ Scot Young: We want to start off with a question for you. By a show of hands, how many of you have put in time and effort into learning another language? Maybe you took a high school Spanish class, or maybe you took a lot of Rosetta Stone, but you can’t confidently speak that language right now. Vat Jaiswal: OK. That’s most of you here. Some of you are raising both of your hands. So, we’ve tried learning a few languages ourselves, we’re going to talk about it in a minute. But let’s talk about what is the problem, what is the main issue that is holding everybody back from learning languages.

Could it be that you’re using the wrong program of study, and if you were to use a perfect program or the application, then you’d be able to learn the language? SY: Well, here the track record isn’t too good. Out of the 1,000 Americans who responded to the General Social Survey, only 7 claimed that they could speak another language very well, and had actually learned it in school. And if you consider self-study programs, like Rosetta Stone or Pimsleur, well, they can work some of the time, but they have another problem: huge drop out rates. [NFLC], at the University of Maryland did a study that took an enthusiastic group of volunteers and found that only 6% put in more than 100 hours with the program, which is far less than what you’d need using these programs to become fluent in any language. VJ: OK, well, maybe then the problem is that you don’t live in the country that uses this language, and if you were to move there, you’d be able to learn it.

SY: Here I have to agree with you, Vat. Living in the country that speaks the language, definitely helps. It provides motivation and an opportunity for immersion. But it’s not the answer to all of your problems. If you go to the country and you don’t yet speak the language, what are you going to do? Are you going to rely on other expats and locals who speak English to help you to get by? And that’s going to create a bubble of English, it is going to isolate you from immersing yourself. So, we know an extreme example. We know of an American businessman who went to Korea, married a Korean woman, had children in Korea, lived in Korea for 20 years, still couldn’t have a decent conversation in Korean. So, living in the other country helps, but it is not a silver bullet that will answer all of your problems on its own. VJ: OK, well, finally maybe the problem is that you’re simply too old, and you should’ve tried learning the language as a kid because kids learn the languages faster, right? SY:This is actually a pervasive myth.

Steven Brown of Einstein University and Jennifer Larson-Hall of Qiushi University reviewed the literature and found adults actually learn languages faster than children in the short run. It’s only when we talk about reaching native-like levels of pronunciation and grammar where children start to show an upper hand over an adult. So, definitely, if you want to just be able to communicate with people, have conversations, there is no reason you can’t learn a second language at any age. VJ: If those are not the core issues, what is the core issue? We have a completely different hypothesis, and to explain this concept I want you to look at this image of the ocean. Now, if you look at the water, you’re going to see 2 distinct zones: zone at the bottom where the waves are breaking, an the zone at the top where the water is relatively calm.

Now, I want you to imagine you’re standing on the shore, and you want to swim out into the ocean. When you first start swimming out into the ocean, you ARE going to be in this first zone where the waves are breaking. And swimming in this zone is incredibly difficult, you feel this incredible resistance, the waves come crushing down on you, and they constantly try to push you back to the shore. However, if you were to push through this zone and get to the second zone, suddenly, swimming becomes a lot easier and more importantly, the waves are not trying to push you back, you’re no longer feel this incredible resistance. So, we believe that language learning works very similar to this. When you first start learning a language, you’re going to be in this first zone which we call ‘the zone of fear’ or ‘the zone of frustration’, because this is where you fear using the language, this is where you fear making mistakes, this is where you fear embarrassing yourself. And learning a language in this zone is very difficult: the waves represent this negative feedback and this constantly tries to push you back to the shore.

However, if you were to push past this zone and get to the second zone where the waters are calmer, suddenly language learning becomes a lot easier, and a lot more fun. Mind you, I’m not saying that you’re perfect when you reach the second zone, or maybe you only know a few words, but you’re able to use them confidently, maybe you’re able to have some simple conversations. And language only goes from being always frustrating to now being rewarding, most of the time. So, the core issue, we believe, that a lot of the people have is that people get stuck in this zone of fear and frustration for longer than they have to, and for some people, forever. And if all you see is negative feedback, it’s very hard to motivate yourself to learn further and improve yourself, and learn the language that you really want to learn. So, ideally, you’d use a different method, a method that allows you to get past this zone very quickly and very efficiently, so you can get to the part where language learning is fun and easy as quickly as you can.

SY: We believe we have this method, a method that cuts through the waves and gets you to the easier part of language learning as quickly and efficiently as possible. It’s very simple. Don’t speak in English. And, that might sound a little obvious or simplistic, but it’s actually really powerful. When you force yourself to speak the language you’re trying to learn, and you learn words and phrases by necessity, not the order it comes up in the textbook That means you automatically learn the most frequent vocabulary and the most important words for your situation. Next, because you don’t know many words and phrases, you’re going to overuse what you do know. This results in effects psychologists call overlearning which allows you to access that information automatically. You don’t need to get your tongue tight or hesitating when you’re using basic words and phrases.

And finally, because you’re not allowed to speak in English you’re going to easily develop conversational work-arounds to handle situations that are above your level. That is going to be from learning simple phrases like: “What does this mean?” and “How do you say this? in the language, relatively early on, to being able to efficiently use things like Google Translator and dictionaries to integrate new words and phrases into your conversations while you’re having them. VJ: So how do we know that this method works? Well, we know that this method works because we’ve tried it for ourselves. So, last year Scott and I did an experiment. But we tried to learn four different languages, and we went to four different countries to learn these languages over a year. And we used the same no-English rule to learn the languages.

So, first we went to Spain to learn Spanish over 3 months, then we went to Brazil to learn Portuguese over 3 months, then over to mainland China to learn Mandarin over 3 months, and finally over to Korea to learn Korean over 3 months. And we found that this no-English rule worked incredibly well. As a matter of fact, near the end of our travels in each country, we were confidently able to have conversations with native speakers pretty much about any subject, and going by our daily lives, using the language that we were trying to learn.

So we actually have a short video that we would like to show you that captures the kind of progress that we were able to make using this no English rule just under 3 months for each country. So, take a look. (Video) SY: This might seem a little bit extreme. After all, wouldn’t it be a lot easier to speak some English when you’re trying to learn the language even if it is not quite as fast as this no-English rule? We actually believe that this is a misconception. And to argue that why it is a misconception, I’d like to reference an experience that I had. You see, years before we did this challenge, I had a different opportunity to learn a second language. I was in the university and I had an opportunity to study abroad for a year in France. And like this trip, I was very eager to learn the local language.

I bought books, I downloaded podcasts, I really wanted to become fluent in French. The only difference that I had no specific rule against speaking in English. I figured, “I’ll go there and I’ll speak as much English as I need to, and I’ll just try to practice French whenever I can.” And after a year of living in France, and pushing myself to study every single day, I did get to a point where I could have a conversation, but it was never easy, it always felt difficult, it always felt like I was a little out of place.

And contrast that to that of my more recent experience in Spain. Once again, we have the motivation and opportunity, but this time we have the no-English rule. From the very first day we came to Spain, we decided we were only going to speak in Spanish. And, as you can probably imagine, with limited Spanish skills it was very difficult in the beginning. We had to communicate to each other almost exclusively through our dictionaries for these first few days. But after 2 weeks something changed, it started to get a bit easier. After a month even easier. And by the third month we were in Spain, it’d become so easy, that living our lives entirely in Spanish was automatic. We didn’t have to think about studying or practicing, it was completely invisible in our lives. And what’s more, after just 3 months in Spain, our Spanish, both of our Spanish, was much better than my French was after a year of living in France and deliberately studying it. And so, when you’re evaluating the difficulty of a method, particularly in learning languages, it’s not really fair to look at that initial sliver of difficulty because you have to look at how much effort you’re going to be putting in not just in the beginning, but day after day, month after month in order to finally being able to learn this language.

And what we found is not even just that the no English rule is faster, but that when you take it over this longer view, it is actually easier than any other method we’ve tried for learning a language. VJ: And I’d like to speak about another misconception that a lot of people have is that you’d somehow be able to completely avoid making mistakes when you first start learning a language. And that’s simply not true. Actually making mistakes is very good because it means you’re using the language and eventually it helps you to gain the confidence that you need to speak the language. When Scott and I were doing this challenge, we made mistakes every day especially in the beginning, everything we said was wrong, but that’s OK.

And in China and in Korea, because Chinese and Korean are so much harder than the European languages we attempted to learn, we slipped up and broke the no English rule a couple of times as well, but it didn’t matter because it is not about making mistakes, how many mistakes you’re making, it is more about that each time you make a mistake you try again. So, remember that the whole goal of this process and this method is to push past this zone of frustration and fear so you can get to the part where language learning becomes fun and easy. Ideally, the way you’d do this is you’d move to the country that speaks this language and go 100% immersion from the first day and commit to the no English rule. But obviously, that’s a bit extreme and a lot of you here might not have the opportunity to do that.

But I’d like to point out that the beauty of the no English rule is that it doesn’t have to be 100% no English all the time with everybody. It can also work in a limited context. So let me give you an example. If you’re trying to learn Spanish and you have a co-worker or colleague that speaks Spanish, maybe you commit to the no English rule every time you see this person. So, every time you’re going to see them you only commit to speaking in Spanish. So if you were to bump in them at the water cooler and you want to make small talk, and you want to say – let’s say you were busy at work – and you want to say: “Oh, I’m so busy today,” it is OK to pull out your dictionary, and translate the entire sentence.

You don’t have to feel ready to say this, the goal is to just try and attempt. And what this really helps you to do is that it helps you out with two really important things. The first one: it helps you to remove the ambiguity of which language should you use, because if with this co-worker, let’s say, you can speak in Spanish, and you can speak in English, obviously you’re going to default to speaking in English because it is so much easier. But by committing to the no English rule, you’re saying: “Every time I see this person I know it is practice time, there is no doubt in my mind that now I have to speak Spanish even if I have to pull out my dictionary.” And the second thing it helps you out with is it helps you develop a habit of speaking the language even at the very low level of ability.

This really helps you out to build the confidence that you eventually are going to need when you’ll start speaking this language to the higher level of ability. SY: So you’ve heard about our challenge. Now we’d like to issue you one. And no, we’re not asking you to sell out your stuff and go to live in a far away country. We’re going to ask you to do something a lot simpler but if you follow through on it, it will still be very effective if you want to finally start having conversations in that language you’d been learning all your life. Just 3 steps. Step 1: Find one person. It could be a native speaker of this language, or it could be another language learner, it could be someone you already know, a friend, a colleague, a spouse, or it could be someone you find online.

There are services like italki.com and livemocha to find conversation partners online. So if you can’t find this person in your life right now, there are easy tools for finding them online. Step 2: Commit to the no English rule with this person. Every time you see them just speak in this language that you’re trying to learn. Tell them that, you know, even though you’re not too great at the language yet, you are going to have to use Google Translator and dictionary a lot in the beginning, that’s OK. Step 3: Start speaking. Once again, it is not something you have to be perfect at. You might slip up and break the “no English” rule, just try again. Pull out your phone, download the Google Translator app, you can type in the whole sentences if you don’t feel comfortable yet speaking the language. The goal is to get you to start speaking, to start building that knowledge of the words, and start practicing those core phrases.

What we’re hoping is that by showing you this method we’re encouraging you to get started with something, not to be perfect, and maybe even today to decide to find that one person and start this rule, and finally start speaking that language. Chinese have an expression: (Chinese) “A good start is a half of success,” which means: “A good start is a half of success.” (Applause). “}

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Study English in Brighton

the BEST English teacher is …

{“en”:”Hi there, Vladimir here with another video on how to learn English OK, let me cut to the chase with this video there is no such thing as the best language teacher You are your best language teacher you need to teach yourself English How important is a teacher for learning a language? Not that important, I believe. But let me make something perfectly clear. I am talking about adult learners people watching this video Independent thinkers, people who know how to use the Internet and this thing called Google search engine for young children the teacher plays an extremely important role but for an adult, not that big of a role And why? Because of this thing called the Internet You don’t need a teacher to find the answer to your question and that’s particularly true of language learning and especially of learning English the arrogance of some teachers on YouTube teachers claiming to have taught people English perfect pronunciation, native fluency confidence, perfect grammar What is it that you taught the person that he or she didn’t already know? How to use the Present Perfect, or how to pronounce the TH sound All those pronunciation gurus on YouTube promising the perfect native pronunciation Go fix Arnold Schwarzenegger u2019s German pronunciation or Melania Trumpu2019s east European accent And the so called student in awe of their language teacher Students get blinded by their teachers he is such a good teacher, she is amazing what, why? what did she or he teach you that you couldn’t learn by yourself? You don’t need a teacher to learn proper pronunciation, correct grammar, new vocabulary actually let me take that back.

You don’t need one particular teacher the best teacher You need to see a teacher in every native speaker from Leonardo DiCaprio to Steve Jobs, from the BBC article to the book you are reading from the blogger to the YouTuber you like Immerse yourself in interesting content read and listen and hopefully find somebody to talk to Not necessarily a teacher, find somebody interesting to talk to, not necessarily a native speaker My book starts with a quote from the one and only Albert Einstein I never teach my pupils.

I only attempt to provide the conditions in which they can learn I believe that every teacher should help the student become an independent learner. Thatu2019s why I wrote Virtually Native where I’ve explained everything I know about learning and teaching English I give you the tools to become an independent learner, what you do with them is up to you. I know that once you learn a skill everything looks so easy I’ve learned English, I speak English and I know very well how itu2019s done but for the beginner everything looks so difficult All those new words and confusing grammar and difficult accents, I know I’ve been there. And beginners are looking for that magical method, that super teacher to pull them through Super teachers don’t exist, and at the same time they are everywhere in the movie you see, the online article you read, in the dictionary you use And your job, as a language learner, is to discover those teachers After all you found me, that’s a start, a great start now, all you need to do is read my book and learn how to learn English Virtually Native is available on Amazon and virtuallynative.com”}

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Study English in Brighton

Study English – Series 3, Episode 23: Talking About Food

{“en”:”Hello, and welcome to Study English, IELTS Preparation. I’m Margot Politis. The topic of food and the customs around preparing food come up often in the IELTS Speaking Test. It is useful to look at this topic area and think about how to select language and organise a response if you’re asked to talk about food, cooking and diet. Let’s begin by listening to someone talk about the various meals she has during the day: I usually have breakfast every morning, and lunch in the early afternoon, a sandwich usually or some instant noodles, but the main meal of the day for me is normally dinner. Let’s go over the language of meals. She mentioned breakfast, the morning meal, lunch, the meal we have in the middle of the day and dinner, which is the evening meal. So what other words are there? In the United States and Britain another word for dinner is supper. In Australia the word supper isn’t used very often and usually refers to a light meal late at night.

In Australia the other word for dinner is tea. Tea can also refer to afternoon tea or high tea, a formal English meal of small sandwiches, scones and a cup of tea. A tea break or a coffee break is a short time during the working day when people have a break with a cup of tea or coffee. Food and drink consumed between meals during the day or night are called snacks. You might hear people talk about ‘brunch’, which is a mid morning meal that combines breakfast and lunch, a bit like the Chinese yum cha. Yumcha is quite familiar to westerners these days and it would be reasonable if asked what your favourite meal is to talk about it as the speaker does here: The family usually gets together on Sunday for a traditional Chinese banquet, or yum cha, either at home or in China town, but usually I eat on my own, or have lunch at work with a colleague. So what might you be asked about meals? You might be asked what you usually have to eat for breakfast or whether you eat breakfast at all. Another common question is ‘What is the main meal of the day?’ How does the speaker answer that? I usually have breakfast every morning, and lunch in the early afternoon, a sandwich usually or some instant noodles, but the main meal of the day for me is normally dinner.

Her answer is dinner, but, as would be expected, she expands her answer to talk about other meals too. It is important to distinguish between meal and staple. Staple means the basic food most commonly eaten. For most people in Asia this is rice as it is with our speaker: Rice is the main staple in my diet. Staples in other countries are potatoes, and wheat in its various forms such as bread, pasta or couscous. When preparing for the IELTS Test, it is important to brainstorm a variety of topics and issues – to begin to develop your own ideas, and build up possible responses.

You should: think of examples think of reasons think of useful vocabulary To start you could divide the topic of food into various aspects such as: meat, fish, vegetables and herbs and spices. Cooking styles: boiling, frying and steaming. Cuisines: Italian, Indian and Japanese. Cooking utensils: pots, pans and woks. Eating utensils: plate, bowl, knife, fork, spoon, chopsticks. There are many things to say and ask about these things.

With food types, you might want to say that you don’t eat meat and that you are a vegetarian. You may even avoid eggs, milk and fish as well, in which case you are a vegan. You could be asked why people choose to be a vegetarian or a vegan. A good reason to be vegetarian is that it is a healthy diet, something our speaker is aware of: I try and have a healthy, balanced diet – not much fried, fatty food, and a good mix of fruit and vegetables. You may be asked about what healthy food is or if junk food is bad for you and why. With utensils it’s possible that you may be asked to compare chopsticks with forks with a question like: Do you prefer to eat with chopsticks or a fork? Now let’s see if you can work out what question might have prompted our speaker’s reply. Listen to the clip, and think what question might have been asked.

Rice is the main staple in my diet. I try and have a healthy, balanced diet – not much fried, fatty food, and a good mix of fruit and vegetables. Perhaps she was asked: ‘Describe what you usually eat?’ That would require describing in the answer. Or ‘What do you usually eat?’, where you would have to identify what you eat. Which question is more likely? Listen again: Rice is the main staple in my diet. I try and have a healthy, balanced diet – not much fried, fatty food, and a good mix of fruit and vegetables. She’s identified or named the things she usually eats, so the most likely question would be: ‘What do you usually eat?’ Let’s try it again. What question? Think about the language function she uses: The family usually gets together on Sunday for a traditional Chinese banquet, or yumcha, either at home or in China town, but usually I eat on my own, or have lunch at work with a colleague.

What about: ‘Is it better to eat alone or with others?’ That needs you to give an opinion. She talks about eating alone, but doesn’t say that it’s better or worse than eating with others. So that’s not right. She explains who she eats with and when, so it’s more likely to be: ‘Who do you usually eat with?’ Does the answer fit? Let’s try it. The family usually gets together on Sunday for a traditional Chinese banquet, or yumcha, either at home or in China town, but usually I eat on my own, or have lunch at work with a colleague. Let’s try one more. What might the question be? I don’t cook much.

My mother is a good cook, and can create great meals just from a wok! We have many dishes including roast duck – my favourite. What about ‘Can you cook?’ She doesn’t really say if she can or can’t. She just says she doesn’t cook much. It’s probably: ‘Who does the cooking where you live?’ I don’t cook much. My mother is a good cook, and can create great meals just from a wok! We have many dishes including roast duck – my favourite.

These questions might be asked individually in Part 1 of the Speaking Test, or joined together in Part 2. Part 2 is the long turn, where you have to talk for one to two minutes in response to a prompt card like this: Talk about what you usually eat every day. You should say: what you eat who you eat with, and who does the cooking where you live Let’s listen to the response: I usually have breakfast every morning, and lunch in the early afternoon, a sandwich usually or some instant noodles, but the main meal of the day for me is normally dinner. That often consists of some meat, maybe grilled, some steamed vegetables and rice. Rice is the main staple in my diet. I try and have a healthy, balanced diet – not much fried, fatty food, and a good mix of fruit and vegetables.

The family usually gets together on Sunday for a traditional Chinese banquet, or yumcha, either at home or in China town, but usually I eat on my own, or have lunch at work with a colleague. I don’t cook much. My mother is a good cook, and can create great meals just from a wok! We have many dishes including roast duck – my favourite. That’s all for now. To find more information about the IELTS Speaking Test, visit our Study English website. Good luck with your studies.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in Brighton

Present Simple vs Present Continuous – Learn English Tenses (Lesson 1)

{“en”:”Hello everyone and welcome to the first instalment of our grammar lessons. As I said in the introduction, we’ll be starting with the tenses And you’ve guessed right. The first two to learn are Present Simple and Present Continuous. So, I’ve made a presentation for you, and I’m going to now take you through the examples on this presentation and explain the usage of these two tenses. So by the end of this session you know exactly when to say ‘I do’ and when to say ‘I am doing’. So, Let’s go over to the presentation now.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in Brighton

‘Shut Up!’ Conversation: Learn English Conversation With Simple English Videos

{“en”:”Whatu2019s orange and sounds like parrot? Carrot. A carrot rhymes with parrot. Ha! Come on. Jay, weu2019re trying to work. Whatu2019s red and smells like blue paint? Red paint. Get it? Red paint. Ha! Jay, Iu2019ve got one for you. Yeah? Whatu2019s loud and sounds like shut up? I donu2019t know, what? Shut up.. “}

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Study English in Brighton

Live English Class | My House | 5 and 6 Year Old Children | ESL | EFL

{“en”:”This is mark. Thanks for watching [okay] ready, my house. Why? My house why oh, okay good okay? Let’s practice some rooms Good the bedroom no the kitchen dinging good the baby around Yes, okay, now. What do we do in these rooms, okay? Where do we get dressed which room get dressed? No Got in the bedroom. We get dressed in the [bedroom] good. Where do we pour milk? In the kitchen good we pour milk in the kitchen. Where do we take a bath? Yeah, we take a bath in the bathroom good Where do we watch TV? Watch TV now things okay Ready, [okay] challenge shuffle or wait wait wait.

Sorry. Let’s do the big ones first. Where’s the towel? Yeah, where is the top look at all sorry sorry sorry let’s practice first, okay? You say it’s okay, right? Good, okay, nice. Okay. Where is the table? [it’s] in the bathroom right the towels in the bathroom. Where is that so far? Yeah, good. It’s in the living room. Where is the [bed]? [good] Where is the refrigerator? Okay now Here we go Okay, I’m not going to show you Here you [can] see the [card] here. You can’t see only listen. Okay? Where is the pillow? Nice. Yes, it’s in the bedroom good. Where is the telephone? Yes, it’s another room Where is the Ball? the Ball nice great Where is the toothbrush? Nice, it’s the bathroom Where is the vacuum cleaner? Nice, you guys are great Where is the alarm clock in the bedroom nice? Nice, okay, good Where is the glass? [yes], it is. Okay. One more. Where is the shower? [ha] [ha] [ok] Let’s review Ready real quick ready, go Good job nice.

Nice. Nice. Nice ok great ok. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in Brighton

What Most Schools Don’t Teach

{“en”:””Everybody in this country should learn how to program a computer… because it teachers you how to think.” >> Bill: created Microsoft I was 13 when I first got access to a computer. >> Jack: created Twitter My parents bought me a Macintosh in 1984 when I was eight years old. I was in sixth grade I learned to code in college. >> Ruchi: First female engineer at Facebook. Freshman year first semester, Intro to Computer Science. I wrote a program that played Tic-tac-toe. >> Drew: Created Dropbox I think it was pretty humble beginnings.

I think the first program I wrote asked things like, What’s your favorite color? Or, How old are you? >> Elena: Created Clothia.com I first learned how make a green circle and a red square appear on the screen. >> Gabe: Created Valve The first time I actually had something come up and say “Hello World”, and I made a computer do that, it was just astonishing. >> Mark: Created Facebook Learning how to program didn’t start off as wanting to learn all of Computer Science or trying to master this discipline or anything like that.

It just started off because I wanted to do this one simple thing. I want to make something that was fun for myself and and my sisters. I wrote this little program then basically just add a little bit to it. Then when I needed to learn something new I looked it up either in a book or on the Internet and then added a little bit to it. It’s really not unlike kind of playing an instrument or something or playing a sport. It starts out being very intimidating, but you kind of get the hang of it over time. >> Chris: NBA All-Star, Coded in College Coding is something that can be learned and…

I know it can be intimidating… a lot of things are intimidating, but… you know, what isn’t? >> Makinde: Early Facebook engineer A lot of the coding that people do is actually fairly simple. It’s more about the process of breaking down problems than coming up with complicated algorithms as people traditionally think about it. >> Vanessa: Created Girl Develop IT You don’t have to be a genius to know how to code. You need to be determined. Addition, subtraction…that’s about about it. >> Tony: CEO @ Zappos You should probably know your multiplication tables. >> Bronwen: Technical artist at Valve You don’t have to be a genius to code. Do you have to be a genius to read? Even if you want to become a race car driver or play baseball or… you know build a house… all of these things have been turned upside down by software. What is it, is you know, computers are everywhere. You want to work in agriculture? Do you want to work in entertainment? Do you want to work in manufacturing? It’s just all over.

Here we are, 2013 >> Will.I.Am: Created The Black Eyed Peas, Now taking coding classes We all depend on technology to communicate, to bank… …information… and none of us know how to read and write code. When I was in school I was in the this after school group called the Whiz Kids and when people found out they laughed at me and you know, all these things and I’m like “Man I don’t care! I think it’s cool and I’m learning a lot and some of my friends have jobs!” Our policy is literally to hire as many talented engineers as we can find.

The whole limit in the system is that there just aren’t enough people who are trained and have these skills today. To get the very best people we try to make the office as awesome as possible. We have a fantastic chef. free food breakfast, lunch and dinner. free laundry Snacks even places to play video games and scooters there’s always kinds of interesting things around the office where people can play, or relax, or go to think, or play music or be creative.

>>HADI: Created Code.Org Whether you’re trying to make a lot of money or whether you just want to change the world, Computer programming is an incredibly empowering skill to learn. I think if someone had told me that software is really about humanity, that it’s really about helping people by using computer technology it would have changed my outlook a lot earlier. To be able to actually come up with an idea and then see it in your hands and then be able to press a button and have it be in millions of people hands, I mean, I think we’re the first generation in the world that’s really ever had that kind of experience. Just to think that you can start something in your college dorm room and you can have a set of people who haven’t built a big company before come together and build something that a billion people use as part of their daily lives…

It’s crazy to think about, right? It’s really, it’s humbling and it’s amazing. The programmers of tomorrow are the wizards of the future. You know, you’re going look like you have magic powers compared to everybody else. It’s amazing. It’s, it’s the closest thing we have to a super power. Great coders are today’s Rock Stars. That’s it! 1 million of the best jobs in America may go unfilled…..because only 1 in 4 schools teach students how to code. Whether you want to be a doctor or a rockstar, ask about a coding class at your school or learn online at Code.org Share this film and visit Code.org.. “}

As found on Youtube

Study English in Brighton